2014-16 Academic Catalog
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Department of Curriculum and Instruction

 (College of Education)

 www.uni.edu/coe/departments/curriculum-instruction

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs.  Specific requirements for these programs are listed within this Department of Curriculum and Instruction section in the following order:

  • Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)
    • Early Childhood Education-Teaching
    • Elementary Education-Teaching (K-6 General Classroom Teacher)
    • Middle Level Education Dual Major-Teaching
  • Minors
    • Educational Technology
    • Literacy Education-Teaching
  • Graduate Majors (M.A.)
    • Instructional Technology
    • School Library Studies
  • Graduate Majors (M.A.E.)
    • Early Childhood Education
    • Elementary Education
    • Literacy Education
  • Graduate Major (Ed.D.)
    • Doctor of Education: Curriculum and Instruction intensive study area (to view all Doctor of Education requirements on the website go to www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation or for pdf version  go to "College of Education" under "Interdisciplinary" section)
  • Program Certificates
    • Instructional Technology Facilitator
    • Advanced Studies Certificate: Literacy Coach
    • Advanced Studies Certificate: Reading Recovery Teacher Leader

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

Early Childhood Education Major-Teaching

This major leads to licensure for teaching young children from birth through grade 3. The student will complete the Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, the specified major requirements, plus electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours. The prescribed program is as follows:

I. Professional Education Requirements-Early Childhood Education

Required:
Special Education:
SPED 3150 (220:150)Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Classrooms2
Instructional Technology:
INSTTECH 1031 (240:031)Educational Technology and Design3

Level I

Educational Psychology:
TEACHING 2017Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching1
EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030)Dynamics of Human Development3

Level II

(Before enrolling in Level II, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.)

TEACHING 3128Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent1
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148)Learning and Instruction in Classroom Contexts3
Human Relations:
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g)Human Relations: Awareness and Application3

Level III

(Before enrolling in Level III, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.)

Social Foundations:
SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119)Schools and American Society3
Teaching:12
Early Childhood Teaching
Total Hours Professional Education Requirements-Early Childhood33

 

II. Early Childhood Education Major Requirements

Required:
Applied Human Services, School of:2
Nutrition for Early Childhood Education
Educational Psychology:3
Development and Assessment of Young Children
Elementary, Early Childhood, and Middle Level Education:23
Teaching Elementary School Science
Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
Infant and Toddler Curriculum and Guidance
Exploring Diversity Among Infants and Toddlers
Guidance and Instruction in Early Childhood Education
Child, Family, School and Community Relationships
Early Childhood Curriculum Development and Organization
Administration of Programs in Early Childhood
Field Experience in Early Childhood Curriculum
Experience
Literacy Education:6
Children's Literature
Methods of Teaching Early Literacy
Mathematics:12
Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers I
Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers II
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers III
Life Science course:3-4
Inquiry into Life Science (recommended)
OR
Any life/biological (BIOL xxxx/840:xxx) science course
Physical Science course:3-4
Inquiry into Physical Science (recommended)
OR
Any chemistry (CHEM xxxx/860:xxx) or physics (PHYSICS xxxx/880:xxx)
Earth/Space Science:3-4
One course from the following:
Inquiry into Earth and Space Science (recommended)
Astronomy
Elements of Weather
Introduction to Geology
Special Education:3
Special Education Issues and Practices for Infants and Toddlers
Total hours58-61

A 2.50 grade index in all course work at the University of Northern Iowa, and, also, a 2.50 GPA in all course work at this university and elsewhere, or the approval of the head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is required for registration in major courses in the department.

Students should plan their course work so that all Early Childhood courses are taken prior to student teaching. Students must have a cumulative, UNI, and major GPA of 2.50 in order to student teach. In addition, students must achieve a grade of C (2.00) or higher in the following methods classes in order to student teach:

ELEMECML 3161 (210:161)Teaching Elementary School Science3
ELEMECML 3164 (210:164)Teaching Elementary School Social Studies3
ELEMECML 4121/5121 (210:121g)Infant and Toddler Curriculum and Guidance3
ELEMECML 4130/5130 (210:130g)Guidance and Instruction in Early Childhood Education3
ELEMECML 4149/5149 (210:149g)Child, Family, School and Community Relationships3
ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g)Early Childhood Curriculum Development and Organization3
LITED 3115 (230:115)Methods of Teaching Early Literacy3
MATH 3203 (800:134)Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School3

Students should apply for their student teaching one year in advance.

Elementary Education Major-Teaching (K-6 General Classroom Teacher)


The student will complete the Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, the major requirements, a 12-hour area of specialization, and electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours. The prescribed program is as follows:

I. Professional Education Requirements-Elementary Education

Required:
Special Education:2
Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Classrooms
Instructional Technology:3
Educational Technology and Design *

*

Students must select INSTTECH 1031 (240:031) Educational Technology and Design in place of INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) Secondary Educational Technology and Design in the Professional Education Requirements unless the computer requirement is addressed in a minor subject field or elective course.

Level I

Educational Psychology:4
Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching
Dynamics of Human Development

Level II

(Before enrolling in Level II, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.)

Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent
Educational Psychology:4
Learning and Instruction in Classroom Contexts
Human Relations:3
Human Relations: Awareness and Application
Measurement and Research:2
Classroom Assessment

Level III

(Before enrolling in Level III, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.)

Social Foundations:3
Schools and American Society
Teaching:12
Elementary Teaching
Total hours Professional Education Requirements-Elementary Education33

II. Elementary Education Major Requirements

Required:
Elementary, Early Childhood, and Middle Level Education:12
Classroom Management K-8
Teaching Elementary School Science
Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
Elementary Curriculum
Elementary, Early Childhood, and Middle Level Education/Music/Art:3-6
Methods of Teaching Visual and Performing Arts Integration in the Elementary Classroom
or all of the following:
Fine Arts Practices in the Classroom: Art
Fine Arts Practices in the Classroom: Music
Fine Arts Practices in the Classroom: Drama and Theatre
Literacy Education:9
Children's Literature
Methods of Teaching Early Literacy
Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades *
Health Promotion and Education/Physical Education/Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services-Interdepartmental (from the following):3-5
Health and Physical Education for Elementary Teachers
or both of the following courses:
Elementary School Health Education Methods
Physical Education for the Elementary Grades
Mathematics:
MATH 1204Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers I3
MATH 2204Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers II3
MATH 3204Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers III3
MATH 3203 (800:134)Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School3
Life Science course:3-4
Inquiry into Life Science (recommended)
OR
Any life/biological (BIOL xxxx/840:xxx) science course
Physical Science course:3-4
Inquiry into Physical Science (recommended)
OR
Any chemistry (CHEM xxxx/860:xxx) or physics (PHYSICS xxxx/880:xxx)
Earth/Space Science:3-4
One course from the following:
Inquiry into Earth and Space Science (recommended)
Astronomy
Elements of Weather
Introduction to Geology
Total Hours48-56

*

Middle Level/Elementary Education double majors may substitute LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g) Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels for LITED 3116 (230:116) Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades.

A 2.50 grade index in all work at the University of Northern Iowa and, also, a 2.50 GPA on all course work at this university and elsewhere, or the approval of the head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is required for registration in major courses in the department.

Students should plan their course work so that the following courses are taken concurrently as a professional semester block, prior to student teaching:

Elementary, Early Childhood, and Middle Level Education:
Classroom Management K-8
Teaching Elementary School Science
Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
Literacy Education:
Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades
Mathematics:
Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School

To be eligible for the courses in the Professional Semester block, students must have completed Level II of the Professional Education Requirements, a curriculum course [ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g) Elementary Curriculum], and have a cumulative 2.50 GPA. Students should plan their course work so that all Elementary Education courses are taken prior to student teaching. Students must have a cumulative, UNI, and major GPA of 2.50 in order to student teach. In addition, students must achieve a grade of C (2.00) or higher in the following methods classes in order to student teach:

ELEMECML 3120 (210:120)Classroom Management K-83
ELEMECML 3161 (210:161)Teaching Elementary School Science3
ELEMECML 3164 (210:164)Teaching Elementary School Social Studies3
LITED 3115 (230:115)Methods of Teaching Early Literacy3
LITED 3116 (230:116)Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades3
MATH 3203 (800:134)Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School3

Students should apply for their student teaching one year in advance.

III.  Area of Specialization

Students will include a 12-hour area of specialization. Liberal Arts Core courses may be counted in the 12-hour area of specialization.

Listed below are teaching minors that are available to students pursuing K-6 General Classroom teacher licensure. Completion of a minor will grant the appropriate endorsement in addition to the K-6 General Classroom teacher endorsement.

Endorsement Minors:
Basic Science (K-8)-Teaching (listed in Science and Science Education)
Health Education (K-8)-Teaching (listed in School of Health, Promotion, and Leisure Services)
Mathematics (K-8)-Teaching (listed in Department of Mathematics)
Modern Languages (K-8)-Teaching (listed in Department of Modern Languages)
Physical Education (K-8)-Teaching (listed in School of Health, Promotion, and Leisure Services)
Social Studies (K-8)-Teaching (listed below)
Special Education-Teaching (listed in Department of Special Education)

 

Social Studies Minor (K-8)-Teaching

Required:
Elementary, Early Childhood, and Middle Level Education:3
Applications/Content in Elementary Social Studies
Completion of 21 hours in social studies to include course work from at least 3 of the following areas:21
Psychology (PSYCH xxxx/400:xxx)
Economics (ECON xxxx/920:xxx)
American Government (POL AMER xxxx/942:xxx)
History: (HIST xxxx/960:xxx) (HISUS xxxx/961:xxx) (HISEUA xxxx/962:xxx) (HISEUB xxxx/963:xxx) (HISNW xxxx/964:xxx)
Geography (GEOG xxxx/970:xxx)
Sociology (SOC xxxx/980:xxx) (CRIM xxxx/982:xxx)
In addition to the course work in three areas above, courses may be taken from:
Social Science (SOC SCI xxxx/900:xxx)
Anthropology (ANTH xxxx/990:xxx)
Total Hours24

Middle Level Education Dual Major-Teaching

This major is designed to prepare students to teach young adolescents at the middle level of education (grades 5-8). This is a dual major and must be combined with either an elementary or secondary education teaching major. This major leads to State of Iowa Middle School Endorsement. Students will complete Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, major requirements for middle level education, major requirements for elementary or secondary education, and endorsement requirements for the Iowa Middle School endorsement for a minimum total of 129 hours.

The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach in grades five through eight in two to four concentration areas in which the specific requirements have been completed. The holder is not authorized to teach art, industrial arts, music, reading, physical education and special education, but may teach in other areas allowed by the State of Iowa.

Required:
Educational Psychology:3
Development of the Middle School Aged Child
Middle Level Education:8
Classroom Management K-8
Approaches to Classroom Management for Secondary Students
Middle Level Instruction, Differentiation, and Assessment
Middle Level Curriculum
Literacy Education:4
Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels
English Language Structures and Usage for K-8 Educators
Total Hours15

Students will complete a minimum of 12 hours of course work in two, three, or four subject area concentrations. Subject area concentrations are limited to the following four areas and must include the specified course work.

Required:
Language Arts: to include composition, language usage, speech, young adult literature, and literature across cultures12
Mathematics: to include algebra12
Science: to include life, earth, and physical 12
Social Studies: to include United States history, world history, government, and geography 12
Minimum of 24 hours

Some or all of this course work may be completed as part of the Liberal Arts Core requirements. Students should contact their advisor, the College of Education Advising Center, or the undergraduate record analyst in the Office of the Registrar to determine specific courses required for the endorsement.

 

Students should plan their course work so that all Middle Level Education courses are taken prior to student teaching. Students must have a cumulative, UNI, and major GPA of 2.50 in order to student teach. In addition, students must achieve a grade of C (2.00) or higher in the following methods classes in order to student teach: 

ELEMECML 3120 (210:120)Classroom Management K-83
ELEMECML 4135/5135 (210:135g)Middle Level Instruction, Differentiation, and Assessment3
LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g)Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels3

and other methods courses required by their second major. Students should apply for their student teaching one year in advance.

Each program of study should be planned so the following courses are completed after Level II of the Professional Education Requirements and prior to student teaching: 

ELEMECML 3120 (210:120)Classroom Management K-83
ELEMECML 4135/5135 (210:135g)Middle Level Instruction, Differentiation, and Assessment3
ELEMECML 4152/5152 (210:150g)Middle Level Curriculum2

and all methods courses.  The student teaching semester will include two experiences, one in either an elementary or secondary classroom, depending on the primary major, and the other in a teamed or departmentalized, grades 5-8, middle level classroom. Students enroll for TEACHING 3137 (280:137) and TEACHING 3134 (280:134) or TEACHING 3138 (280:138) for a total of 12 hours.

 

Minors

Educational Technology Minor

 The Educational Technology Minor has 6 designated courses, however 2 of the courses [INSTTECH 4110/5110 and INSTTECH 4138/5138 (240:138g)] can be replaced by other courses in specific subject areas (i.e., Assistive Technologies for Special Ed) with student request and instructor permission.  Educational Technology minor students may begin their program in either Fall or Spring semester.

Required:
Instructional Technology:
INSTTECH 1020 (240:020)Secondary Educational Technology and Design2-3
or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031) Educational Technology and Design
INSTTECH 1030 (240:030)Creating Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments3
INSTTECH 4110/5110Developing and Designing Online Learning3
INSTTECH 4131/5131 (240:131g)Exploring Issues and Trends in Instructional Technology3
INSTTECH 4138/5138 (240:138g)Understanding Visual Literacy3
INSTTECH 4139/5139 (240:139g)Planning and Producing Instructional Media3
Total Hours17-18

Literacy Education Minor -Teaching

Required:
Literacy Education:4
Assessment and Evaluation of Literacy
Experience in Literacy: Field
Course work chosen for appropriate endorsement21
Total Hours25

Reading K-8 Endorsement

Literacy Education:
LITED 1044 (230:044)Children's Literature3
LITED 3115 (230:115)Methods of Teaching Early Literacy3
LITED 3116 (230:116)Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades3
or LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g) Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels
LITED 3119 (230:119)Language Development and Emergent Literacy3
LITED 3121 (230:121)Advanced Children's Literature3
LITED 4147/5147Advanced Literacy Practices3
LITED 4192/5192Experience in Literacy: Tutoring3
Total Hours21

Reading 5-12 Endorsement

Literacy Education:
LITED 3119 (230:119)Language Development and Emergent Literacy3
or TESOL 4510/5510 (630:165g) Language Development
LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g)Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels3
LITED 4147/5147Advanced Literacy Practices3
LITED 4192/5192Experience in Literacy: Tutoring3
Languages and Literatures/Linguistics:
ENGLISH 2520 (620:040)Multicultural Literature3
or ENGLISH 2420 (620:053) Survey of American Literature
ENGLISH 4940/5940 (620:165g)Literature for Young Adults3
ENGLISH 4920/5920 (620:193g)The Teaching of Writing3
or TESOL 4120/5120 (630:125g) Introduction to Linguistics
or TESOL 4110/5110 (630:130g) The Structure of English
Total Hours21

English/Language Arts K-8 Endorsement

Literacy Education:
LITED 1044 (230:044)Children's Literature3
LITED 3115 (230:115)Methods of Teaching Early Literacy3
LITED 3116 (230:116)Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades3
or LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g) Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels
LITED 3119 (230:119)Language Development and Emergent Literacy3
LITED 3121 (230:121)Advanced Children's Literature3
Languages and Literatures/Linguistics:
ENGLISH 2520 (620:040)Multicultural Literature3
or ENGLISH 2420 (620:053) Survey of American Literature
or ENGLISH 4940/5940 (620:165g) Literature for Young Adults
Theatre:
THEATRE 3000 (490:101)Creative Drama3
or ELEMECML 4123/5123 (210:123g) Methods of Teaching Visual and Performing Arts Integration in the Elementary Classroom
Total Hours21

In order to declare the Literacy Education Minor, a student must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher. To continue in the minor, students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) Language Development and Emergent Literacy or above and maintain a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher.

Persons selecting this program are eligible for the State of Iowa Reading K-8, Reading 5-12, or English/Language Arts K-8 endorsement, depending on their choice of courses.

Master of Arts Degree Programs

Major in Instructional Technology

This major is designed to prepare educators for a variety of professional positions in educational settings, including school building level, school district level, and alternative schools.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made. 

This major is available on both the thesis and non-thesis options, and requires a minimum of 33-45 semester hours depending on the option chosen. A minimum of 15 semester hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the thesis option. A minimum of 12 semester hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

All students completing the thesis option are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination prepared and administered by the thesis committee. This comprehensive examination will normally accompany the thesis defense. A student completing the thesis option must include 6 hours of INSTTECH 6299 (240:299) in the program of study.

All students completing the non-thesis option are required to complete the departmental graduate research requirement and prepare a comprehensive ePortfolio at the end of the student's program of study.

Required:
INSTTECH 4131/5131 (240:131g)Exploring Issues and Trends in Instructional Technology3
INSTTECH 6232 (240:232)Selecting and Integrating Instructional Technology3
INSTTECH 4139/5139 (240:139g)Planning and Producing Instructional Media3
INSTTECH 6240 (240:240)Understanding Instructional Design3
INSTTECH 6237 (240:237)Leading Change Through Instructional Technology3
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
INSTTECH 6250Writing a Graduate Paper/ePortfolio3
INSTTECH 6299 (240:299)Research3 or 6
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Electives: Choose Option 1 or 2 below: 6-18
Option 1 (6 hours - thesis) (9 hours - non-thesis)
Option 2 (18 hours)
Total hours Option 1 - thesis or non-thesis option33
Total hours Option 2 thesis option45
Total hours Option 2 non-thesis option42

Option 1

Electives:
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
Instructional Technology:
INSTTECH 4138/5138 (240:138g)Understanding Visual Literacy3
INSTTECH 4153/5153 (240:153g)Using Digital and Social Media in Education3
INSTTECH 4170/5170 (240:170g)Supporting Learning with Dynamic Web Design3
INSTTECH 6260 (240:260)Advanced Instructional Technology Projects1-4
INSTTECH 6285 (240:285)Readings in Instructional Technology1-3
INSTTECH 6286 (240:286)Studies in Instructional Technology1-4
INSTTECH 6297 (240:297)Practicum in Instructional Technology1-4
INSTTECH 4110/5110Developing and Designing Online Learning3
INSTTECH 6205 (240:205)Instructional Computing Design3

Option 2

Electives:
School Library Studies:
SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g)Introduction to the School Library Program3
SLS 4115/5115 (350:115g)Organization of Information3
SLS 4132/5132 (350:132g)Library Resources for Children3
or SLS 4134/5134 (350:134g) Library Resources for Young Adults
SLS 6225 (350:225)Administration of the School Library Program3
SLS 6250 (350:250)Reference Services and Information Retrieval3
SLS 6290 (350:290)Practicum (3 hrs.)3

Major in School Library Studies

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should  refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 36 semester hours is required for the thesis option, and a minimum of 33 semester hours is required for the non-thesis option. A minimum of 15 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the thesis option. A minimum of 12 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

Students choosing the thesis option are required to write a thesis and pass an oral defense conducted by the thesis committee. Students choosing the non-thesis option are required to complete the departmental graduate research requirement. In lieu of a comprehensive examination, all students must complete a comprehensive portfolio, during their final semester of course work, that meets the requirements of the division faculty.

The program is open to students who hold or have completed coursework for teaching licensure. Students completing this major are eligible for the K-12 School Teacher Librarian endorsement if they hold or are eligible to hold a teaching license.

Required:
School Library Studies:30
Introduction to the School Library Program
Organization of Information
Library Resources for Children
Library Resources for Young Adults
School Library Curriculum Development
Administration of the School Library Program
Technologies for Libraries
Reference Services and Information Retrieval
Practicum
Research in Library and Information Science
Research:3 or 6
Research
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Thesis Option36
Non-thesis Option33

Students who have previous course work which is equivalent to required courses are encouraged to take elective courses in instructional technology, gifted education, postsecondary education, or other education-related programs.

 

Master of Arts in Education Degree Programs

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers three Master of Arts in Education degree programs. The student must complete the professional core, required courses in the program, and electives, if any, for a specified number of semester hours in the program of study.

Major in Early Childhood Education

This program is designed to improve the students' competence in teaching young children and in providing leadership for program development and implementation.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

The degree program in this major requires a minimum of 30 semester hours for non-thesis option or a minimum of 33 semester hours for thesis option.

Students completing the thesis option are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination prepared and administered by the thesis committee. The examination will be comprehensive in nature and will normally accompany the thesis defense. Students completing the thesis option must include 6 hours of ELEMECML 6299 (210:299) Research on the program of study. Students completing the non-thesis option are required to complete:

  1. The department graduate research requirement
  2. A performance-based and/or standard-based measure demonstrating student competency upon completion of the program.

The program may be extended by students wishing to complete the State of Iowa licensure endorsement for Early Childhood Education.

Required professional core:
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
Curriculum and Instruction:
ELEMECML 6201 (210:201)Issues and Trends in Curriculum3
ELEMECML 6205Technology in Early Childhood Education3
ELEMECML 6210Diversity in Early Childhood Education: Theory and Practice3
ELEMECML 6221 (210:221)Analysis and Design of Curriculum for Young Children3
ELEMECML 6236Assessment in Early Childhood3
LITED 6212 (230:212)Methods and Materials in Literacy Education3
ELEMECML 6214 (210:214)Recent Research in Early Childhood Education3
Research:3 or 6
Research
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Total hours thesis option33
Total hours non-thesis option30


Major in Elementary Education

This program is designed to improve the student’s effectiveness as a classroom teacher, instructional leader, curriculum developer, and action researcher.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

The degree program in this major requires a minimum of 30 semester hours for non-thesis option or a minimum of 33 semester hours for thesis option.

Students completing the thesis option are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination prepared and administered by the thesis committee. This comprehensive examination will normally accompany the thesis defense. Students on the thesis option must include 6 hours of ELEMECML 6299 (210:299) Research on the program of study. Students completing the non-thesis option are required to complete the department graduate research requirement.

The program may be extended by students wishing to complete the State of Iowa licensure endorsement for Elementary Education.

Required Professional Core:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Curriculum and Instruction:
LITED 6212 (230:212)Methods and Materials in Literacy Education3
ELEMECML 6201 (210:201)Issues and Trends in Curriculum3
ELEMECML 4141/5141 (210:141g)Integrated Activities in Elementary School Science and Mathematics3
ELEMECML 6242 (210:242)Analysis and Improvement of Science Instruction in the Elementary School3
ELEMECML 6243 (210:243)Analysis and Improvement of Social Studies Instruction in the Elementary School3
ELEMECML 6289 (210:289)Seminar in Education6
Research:3 or 6
Research
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Total hours (non-thesis option)30
Total hours (thesis option)33

Major in Literacy Education

This program is designed to develop and extend the expertise of educators in both leadership and classroom positions who wish to specialize in the area of literacy education. Students examine theories, programs and practices in the teaching of literacy, the evaluation of literacy development and the integration of literacy across curricular areas.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

In addition to the university requirements for admission to graduate study, admission to this program includes the following requirements:

  1. Two recommendations from professional educators
  2. Satisfactory completion of writing examination.  Preference may be given to applications with academic background and/or professional experience in education.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

The degree program in this major requires a minimum of 33 semester hours.

Students completing the thesis option are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination prepared and administered by the thesis committee. This comprehensive examination will normally accompany the thesis defense. Students on the thesis option must include 6 hours of LITED 6299 (230:299) Research on the program of study. Students completing the non-thesis option are required to complete

  1. The department graduate research requirement
  2. A performance-based and/or standard-based measure demonstrating student competency upon completion of the program.

The program may be extended by students wishing to complete any of the four State of Iowa licensure endorsements: K-8 Reading, Reading Specialist, English/Language Arts K-8, or Secondary Reading.

Required Professional Core:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Literacy Education:21
Methods and Materials in Literacy Education
Advanced Assessment and Evaluation of Literacy Development
Advanced Literacy Studies
Language Development and Variability
Ideological, Cultural, and Sociopolitical Issues in Children's Literature
Roles of the Reading Specialist
Practicum
Literacy Education Research Requirement:3 or 6
Research
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Approved Electives:0 or 3
Thesis Option (0 hours)
Non-thesis Option (3 hours)
Issues and Trends in Curriculum
Seminar
Total hours33

Doctor of Education Degree Program

(To view all Doctor of Education requirements on the website go to www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation or for PDF version  go to "College of Education" under "Interdisciplinary" section.)

Students interested in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the appropriate Intensive Study Area (ISA) for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admission to the program.

This program is intended to provide practicing educators, in formal and nonformal settings, the opportunity to continue their study and earn the terminal professional degree in their field. The Ed.D. degree requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit beyond the master's degree. There are three components to the program:

Professional Common Core (work in educational foundations, fundamentals, and research)27
Advanced Professional Study (in one of three areas of intensive study)27
Dissertation6
Total Hours60

 

By design, all students are required to study in basic areas that undergird and define educational practice and develop skills of problem definition, data collection and analysis, and interpretation. The three areas of intensive study provide for a specialized focus on practice. The three intensive study areas (ISAs) are:

  • Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Leadership

Note: Students interesteded in special education with the Curriculum and Instruction ISA or the Educational Leadership ISA should consult the respective ISA descriptions for further information.

In some areas, it is possible to combine doctoral degree study with work toward an endorsement to perform a particular role in K-12 education.

Brief definitions of the three ISAs follows:

Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services

This area of intensive study is designed to provide students with advanced planning, management, supervision and evaluation of programs in the community and its institutions. The combined areas of allied health, recreation and community services are diverse professional areas knitted together by a unified commitment to enhancing, enriching and sustaining individual well-being and quality of life. Each of these areas contributes unique and different professional perspectives, yet, at the same time, focuses on the individual and collective well-being of people, communities and society as a whole. Graduates are prepared for careers as applied scholars, evaluators, athletic administration, administrators of community nonprofit organizations, youth serving agencies, public parks and recreation agencies, foundations, and government agencies. The program of study will be based upon student's needs, interests, and upon approval by an academic advisor and program of study committee. (For more information, contact the Chair of Leisure, Youth and Human Services Division, the Health Promotion and Education Division, or the Athletic Training Division in the School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services.)

Curriculum and Instruction

This area of intensive study is designed to prepare scholar practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children, from infancy through adolescence, and adult learners, inclusive of a wide variety of diversity. Faculty in this intensive study area come from many departments and disciplines, including but not limited to prekindergarten through tertiary curriculum and pedagogy; foundations of education in psychology, philosophy, social sciences; disability studies, gifted and talented, and multicultural education; literacy education; instructional technology, school library studies; and P-12 content areas such as mathematics, physical education, science, social studies, and language arts. Students interested in becoming special education scholar-practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children and adult learners with an emphasis on inclusion and diversity will apply for admission through the Curriculum and Instruction Intensive Study Area. For more information see www.uni.edu/coe/departments/curriculum-instruction/graduate-study/doctoral-study.

Educational Leadership

This area of intensive study in education administration prepares personnel for leadership positions in PK-12 schools, post-secondary institutions, and other educational services or settings. Typical positions held by educators with the terminal degree focused on educational leadership include: principals, superintendents, school district central office administrators, professors of educational leadership, special education directors at the Area Education Agency level or Department of Education administrators and consultants. Students interested in special education administration will apply for admission through Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education. (For more information, contact the Head, Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education, or please see the catalog at www.uni.edu/catalog.uni.edu/collegeofeducation/educationalleadershipandpostsecondaryeducation or visit the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education website at www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education.

 

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following certificates, contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Instructional Technology Facilitator Certificate

Required:
Instructional Technology:18
Exploring Issues and Trends in Instructional Technology
Using Digital and Social Media in Education
Supporting Learning with Dynamic Web Design
Selecting and Integrating Instructional Technology
Leading Change Through Instructional Technology
Advanced Instructional Technology Projects
Total Hours18


Advanced Studies Certificate: Literacy Coach

Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL): Literacy Coach Preparation Program

Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) is a systemic school transformation model.  The University of Northern Iowa's Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy is one of seven national preparation sites for the PCL program.  Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy coaches provide professional development to teachers in schools that are implementing PCL. 

The Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) Coach program is administered by the Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy. The PCL program is intended for practicing educators whose school, district, or Area Education Agency apply for admission to the Jacobson Center's PCL program and who seek to be the Literacy Coach in his/her school, district, or Area Education Agency.  Students take courses over the course of a full academic year, beginning with a summer course.  The program includes 21 hours of UNI graduate-credit coursework. Courses include the following:

Summer (Summer Institute)3
Coaching in the Comprehensive Literacy Model
Students attend a four-day institute at the Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy in Cedar Falls and complete coursework online following the institute.
OR
Coaching in the Comprehensive Intervention Model
Students attend a four-day institute at the Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy in Cedar Falls and complete coursework online following the institute.
Fall:
LITED 7304 (230:304)Literacy Leadership I3
LITED 7307 (230:307)Theories of Reading and Writing Processes3
ELEMECML 6201 (210:201)Issues and Trends in Curriculum3
Spring:
LITED 7305 (230:305)Literacy Leadership II3
LITED 7306 (230:306)Theories of Reading Difficulties3
LITED 6260 (230:260)Roles of the Reading Specialist3
or LITED 7397 (230:397) Practicum in Reading
Total Hours21

 An abbreviated PCL Coach Certificate Program is proposed for previously trained Reading Recovery Teacher Leaders (Reading Recovery Teacher Leader preparation is an 18-hour graduate level program completed at one of 20 Reading Recovery Training Centers approved by the Reading Recovery of North American Trainers Group. A transcript review will be conducted for all Reading Recovery Teacher Leaders who did not complete their program at UNI.)

UNI-trained Reading Recovery Teacher Leaders, or Reading Recovery Teacher Leaders trained at another university training site and have a satisfactory transcript review, who wish to becom CIM Literacy Coaches will take courses over the course of a full academic year, beginning with a summer course. The program includes 6 hours of UNI graduate-credit coursework. Courses include the following:

Summer (Summer Institute):
LITED 7320Coaching in the Comprehensive Intervention Model3
Students attend a four-day institute at the Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy in Cedar Falls and complete coursework online following the institute.
Spring:
LITED 7397 (230:397)Practicum in Reading3
Total Hours6

During the Fall and Spring semesters, PCL literacy coaches-in-preparation begin working on implementation of the PCL model in their schools, districts, or AEAs. This task is the central focus of the preparation program and is tightly integrated with all coursework. Literacy coaches make monthly visits to the UNI campus for classes that typically last two or three days. Additional coursework occurs via online formats, including eLearning, Polycom Telepresence, and Zoom.us. Jacobson Center faculty also conduct site visits to participants' schools, districts, or AEAs.

Coursework generally consists of readings that are directly related to the implementation of the PCL model; small-group discussion of the readings; observation of PCL model schools, classrooms, and meetings; planning for implementation; and reflection on implementation. These tasks are accomplished not only during the on-campus class meetings but also through online activities that occur outside of on-campus meetings. In their schools during the preparation year, coaches can expect to teach a small group of students, work intensely with model classroom teachers, conduct and facilitate professional development sessions of various types with their school faculty, and work with their principal to establish meeting routines as well as school-wide assessment and instructional systems. These tasks also comprise the bulk of the class assignments, in addition to compilation of a portfolio documenting students' completion of the tasks.

Admission requirements:

Literacy coach applicants must:

1.    hold a master's degree in literacy education or other related field;

2.    hold a valid teaching license;

3.    be employed as literacy coach in their school, districut, or AEA or be under contract to be the literacy coach during the preparation year;

4.    have a minimum of three years of teaching experience; and

5.    meet UNI requirements for admission to graduate study.


Advanced Studies Certificate: Reading Recovery Teacher Leader

Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Preparation Program

Reading Recovery (RR) is a trademarked literacy intervention model with extensive research documenting its effectiveness. What Works Clearinghouse and the Response to Intervention Center (both of which are part of the USDE), have awarded Reading Recovery with the highest ratings. The Reading Recovery Center of Iowa, housed within the Jacobson Center for Comprehensive Literacy at the University of Northern Iowa, is one of only 20 RR University Training Centers approved by the RR North American Trainers Group.

The RR Teacher Leader (RRTL) program is intended for practicing educators whose school districts or Area Education Agencies (AEAs) apply for admission to the Reading Recovery Center of Iowa's RRTL program and who seek to be the RRTL in his/her school district or AEA. Students take courses over the course of a full academic year, beginning with the fall semester. The program includes 18 hours of UNI graduate-credit coursework. Courses include the following:

Fall:
LITED 7302 (230:302)Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Clinical I3
LITED 7304 (230:304)Literacy Leadership I3
LITED 7307 (230:307)Theories of Reading and Writing Processes3
Spring:
LITED 7303 (230:303)Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Clinical II3
LITED 7305 (230:305)Literacy Leadership II3
LITED 7306 (230:306)Theories of Reading Difficulties3
Total Hours18

RRTLs attend classes on the UNI Campus or in the field. Additional coursework occurs via online formats, including UNI eLearning, Polycom Telepresence, and Zoom.us. A faculty member who is a RR Trainer or a Teacher Leader who is an instructor in the Jacobson Center also conducts site visits to participants' school districts or AEAs.

Coursework generally consists of readings that are directly related to the implementation of RR, small-group discussion of the readings, observation of RR lessons and RR teacher classes, planning for implementation, and reflection on implementation. These tasks are accomplished not only during the on-campus class meetings but also through online and field activities that occur outside of on-campus meetings. In their schools during the preparation year, RRTLs teach four RR students daily, and observe and practice leading RR teacher preparation classes.

Admission requirements:

RRTL applicants must:

1.    hold a master's degree in literacy education or other related field;

2.    hold a valid teaching license;

3.    be employed as RRTL in their school district or AEA or be under contract to be the RRTL during the preparation year;

4.    have a minimum of three years of teaching experience; and

5.    meet UNI requirements for admission to graduate study.

 

Early Childhood Education Teaching, B.A.

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
Writing And Reading3Liberal Arts5
Liberal Arts5Speaking And Listening3
MATH 12043SCI ED 1300 (820:031)4
SCI ED 1200 (820:032)4EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030)3
 TEACHING 20171
 15 16
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
INSTTECH 1031 (240:031)3Liberal Arts6
SPED 3150 (220:150)2TEACHING 31281
LITED 1044 (230:044)3EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148)3
MATH 22043EDPSYCH 4109/5109 (200:109g)3
Liberal Arts Core (SCI ED 1100 or EARTHSCI 1100, EARTHSCI 1200, EARTSCI 1300)3-4LITED 3115 (230:115)3
 14-15 16
Junior
FallHoursSpringHours
LAC (Non-Western Cultures)3Liberal Arts Capstone2
ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g)3ELEMECML 4121/5121 (210:121g)3
ELEMECML 4192/5192 (210:192g)2-4ELEMECML 4122/51221
ELEMECML 4160/51601ELEMECML 3164 (210:164)3
MATH 32043SPED 4144/51443
ELEMECML 4149/5149 (210:149g)3ELEMECML 3161 (210:161)3
NUTR 1031 (310:031)2 
 17-19 15
Senior
FallHoursSpringHours
SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119)3TEACHING 3132 (280:132)12
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g)3 
ELEMECML 4130/5130 (210:130g)3 
ELEMECML 4192/5192 (210:192g)2-4 
MATH 3203 (800:134)3 
 14-16 12
Total credit hours: 119-124

 

 

 

Elementary Education Teaching, B.A.

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
University Electives2Liberal Arts9
Speaking And Listening3SCI ED 1300 (820:031)4
SCI ED 1200 (820:032)4Writing And Reading3
Liberal Arts4 
MATH 12043 
 16 16
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
One from SCI ED 1100, EARTH SCI 1100, 1200, or 13003-4University Electives5
Liberal Arts3Liberal Arts3
INSTTECH 1031 (240:031)3TEACHING 20171
MATH 3211 (800:111g)3EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030)3
LITED 1044 (230:044)3MATH 32043
 15-16 15
Junior
FallHoursSpringHours
Liberal Arts2University Electives4
TEACHING 31281ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g)3
EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148)3SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119)3
MEASRES 3150 (250:150)2HPELS 2045 (440:045) (Or both HPELS 3135 or PEMES 2045)3-5
ELEMECML 4123/5123 (210:123g) (Or all of the following: MUSIC 3020; THEATRE 3112; ARTED 15003-6 
SPED 3150 (220:150)2 
LITED 3115 (230:115)3 
 16-19 13-15
Senior
FallHoursSpringHours
ELEMECML 3120 (210:120)3Student Teaching12
ELEMECML 3161 (210:161)3 
ELEMECML 3164 (210:164)3 
LITED 3116 (230:116)3 
MATH 3203 (800:134)3 
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g)3 
 18 12
Total credit hours: 121-127

 

 

 

Middle Level Education Teaching, B.A.

Dual major must be combined with either an elementary or secondary teaching major. See the Department of Curriculum and Instruction Overview link/information for courses required for the Dual Major with Elementary Education. Secondary Teaching majors should consult with their advisors regarding adding the Middle Level Dual Major.

 


Elementary, Early Childhood and Middle Level Education Courses

ELEMECML 3120 (210:120). Classroom Management K-8 — 3 hrs.

Focus on skills needed to plan, organize, manage, implement, and evaluate appropriate instruction in the elementary classroom. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g); junior standing. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 3161 (210:161). Teaching Elementary School Science — 3 hrs.

Investigation of current textbook series, trends, teaching materials, and appropriate instructional strategies for contemporary elementary school science programs. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g) or ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g); junior standing. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 3164 (210:164). Teaching Elementary School Social Studies — 3 hrs.

Basic methods and materials for teaching the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values in history, geography, political science/civic literacy, economics and behavioral sciences. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g) or ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g); junior standing. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 4121/5121 (210:121g). Infant and Toddler Curriculum and Guidance — 3 hrs.

Methods of implementing appropriate curriculum for and guidance of very young children, including children with diverse needs in inclusive group settings. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g); EDPSYCH 4109/5109 (200:109g); junior standing. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. Requires full admission to Teacher Education. Corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4122/5122; SPED 4144/5144. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4122/5122. Exploring Diversity Among Infants and Toddlers — 1 hr.

Direct and indirect experiences with both typically and atypically developing infants and toddlers in group care, home, and other settings. Requirements include, but are not limited to a minimum of 20 hours of direct experience in child care settings serving infants and toddlers, a minimum of 10 hours of direct experience with atypically developing infants and toddlers and their families and service providers, and a minimum of 5 hours of indirect experiences in settings providing services to atypically developing infants and toddlers. Prerequisite(s): Level II of the Professional Education Requirements; ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g). Corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4121/5121 (210:121g); SPED 4144/5144. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4123/5123 (210:123g). Methods of Teaching Visual and Performing Arts Integration in the Elementary Classroom — 3 hrs.

Introduction, exploration and application of various methods for teaching and assessing visual and performing arts integration with content across the elementary curriculum. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 4130/5130 (210:130g). Guidance and Instruction in Early Childhood Education — 3 hrs.

Discussion of the role of the teacher in guiding young children in their learning activities. Emphasis on planning and implementing early childhood programs. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g); junior standing. Corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4192/5192 (210:192g). Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4135/5135 (210:135g). Middle Level Instruction, Differentiation, and Assessment — 3 hrs.

Strategies for instruction, differentiation, and assessment for addressing the cognitive characteristics and needs of young adolescents in grades five through eight. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148); EDPSYCH 4152/5152 (200:152g); junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4152/5152 (210:150g) or equivalent. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4141/5141 (210:141g). Integrated Activities in Elementary School Science and Mathematics — 3 hrs.

Pedagogy that facilitates the development of cross-cutting concepts and habits of inquiry within STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) through authentic, meaningful, and integrative investigations in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite(s): for undergraduate students: junior standing. Prerequisites for graduate students: admission to the Elementary Education Master's Program (MAE) or consent of instructor. (Spring)

ELEMECML 4142/5142 (210:142g). Sustainability Applications in Elementary Science Teaching — 3 hrs.

Resources, content background and materials in elementary science with emphasis on sustainability applications. Special attention to integrating theory and practice with techniques, materials, and equipment. Stresses interrelations between the various sciences and application of skill subjects. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4143/5143 (210:143g). Applications/Content in Elementary Social Studies — 3 hrs.

Applying knowledge of current trends, resources, and content as a means of developing, enriching, and expanding the social studies curriculum. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 3164 (210:164); junior standing. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Fall)

ELEMECML 4149/5149 (210:149g). Child, Family, School and Community Relationships — 3 hrs.

Procedures for developing home-community-school relationships to promote the education of each child in reaching her/his maximum potential. Emphasis on preschool-kindergarten level. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g). Elementary Curriculum — 3 hrs.

Recent trends in the curriculum for children in grades K-6. Prerequisite(s): completion of Level I of the Professional Education Requirements - Elementary Education; junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): Level II of the Professional Education Requirements. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g). Early Childhood Curriculum Development and Organization — 3 hrs.

Current trends in curriculum for preschool and primary children. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 4109/5109 (200:109g); completion of Level I of the Professional Education Requirements - Early Childhood Education; junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): Level II of the Professional Education Requirements. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4152/5152 (210:150g). Middle Level Curriculum — 2 hrs.

Examination of middle school design, programs, and practices for meeting the needs of young adolescents in grades 5-8, including middle school philosophy, history, interdisciplinary instruction and teaming, core curriculum, exploratory courses, and advisory programs. Students must be available for a Tuesday field experience. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): Level II of the Professional Education Requirements. Registration requires full admission to the teacher education program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. Students must be available for a 10-hour field experience. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4154/5154. The Gifted and Talented — 3 hrs.

Educational needs of gifted and talented children and youth. Emphasis on characteristics, identification/assessment, special populations, counseling, parenting, and program intervention. Prerequisite(s): full admission to teacher education; junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4155/5155 (210:155g). Constructivist Early Education — 3 hrs.

Overview of theory and practice in constructivist early childhood education. Survey of sociomoral atmosphere (including group time, rule making, voting, social and moral discussion, academics, etc.), physical knowledge activities, group games, and classroom management. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4156/5156. Educational Strategies for Gifted and Talented — 3 hrs.

Current trends in educational programming for the gifted and talented. Prescription, implementation, and evaluation of differentiated curriculum/educational strategies used in the comprehensive program. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4154/5154 or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4157/5157. Coordinating Programs for the Gifted and Talented — 3 hrs.

Methods/procedures for coordinating/directing school district PK-12 programs for the gifted and talented. Emphasis on program planning, management, supervision, and evaluation. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4154/5154; ELEMECML 4156/5156; or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4158/5158. Practicum in Education of the Gifted — 3 hrs.

Practicum in which curriculum and instructional methods for Education of the Gifted are used with preK-12 students. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4154/5154; 4156; 4157; junior standing. (Variable)

ELEMECML 4160/5160. Administration of Programs in Early Childhood — 1 hr.

Overview of knowledge and skills necessary for designing, planning, implementing, assessing, managing, and leading integrated, developmentally appropriate programs for children of diverse backgrounds and abilities, ages birth-8 years. Prerequisite(s): Full admission to Teacher-Education; Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course; junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4161/5161. Field Experience in Early Childhood Curriculum — 1 hr.

Direct and indirect experiences with both typically and atypically developing preprimary and primary age children in group care. Requirements include, but are not limited to a minimum of 20 hours of direct experience in preprimary or, primary, settings, and a minimum of 10 hours of direct experience with atypically developing children and their families and service providers. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g). Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 4192/5192 (210:192g). Experience — 2-4 hrs.

May be offered in various specialized fields as indicated in Schedule of Classes, but may be taken only twice for credit in the same area. Prerequisite(s): successful completion of TEACHING 2017 and TEACHING 3128; junior standing. Corequisite(s): ELEMECML 4130/5130 (210:130g). Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

ELEMECML 6201 (210:201). Issues and Trends in Curriculum — 3 hrs.

Current ideas influencing the planning and implementation of curriculum. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6204 (210:204). Curriculum Construction — 3 hrs.

Role of the classroom teacher in curriculum development projects, focusing on educational change process, procedures, and product evaluation. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 6201 (210:201) or consent of the head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6205. Technology in Early Childhood Education — 3 hrs.

Current theory and practical strategies for planning and implementing appropriate experiences for young children and families. Students will enhance current understandings regarding race, ethnicity, culture, socio-economic status, and inclusion of children with special needs. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6210. Diversity in Early Childhood Education: Theory and Practice — 3 hrs.

Current theory and practical strategies for planning and implementing appropriate experiences for young children and families. Students will learn current understandings re: race, ethnicity, culture, socio-economic status, and inclusion of children with special needs. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 6201 (210:201). (Variable)

ELEMECML 6214 (210:214). Recent Research in Early Childhood Education — 3 hrs.

Review of implications of research to gain techniques for improving instruction and programs for young children. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4151/5151 (210:151g) or equivalent. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6220 (210:220). Administration and Supervision of Programs for Young Children — 3 hrs.

Preparation to plan, organize, and operate public and private programs for young children, including working with families and with other social agencies, obtaining and administering funds, staffing, providing for health and safety, and curriculum decisions. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6221 (210:221). Analysis and Design of Curriculum for Young Children — 3 hrs.

Basic assumptions underlying curriculum for young children to prepare students to improve teaching practices, and provide direction to future decision making on programs and materials. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6225 (210:225). Advanced Constructivist Education — 3 hrs.

Study of theory, research, and curriculum in constructivist education. Selected theoretical topics. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4155/5155 (210:155g); ELEMECML 6221 (210:221). (Variable)

ELEMECML 6228 (210:228). Comparative Early Childhood Curricula — 2 hrs.

Comparative study of curricula and programs of early education including the Montessori Method, Bank Street theory and practice, and various programs based on Piagetian theory. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4155/5155 (210:155g); ELEMECML 6221 (210:221). (Variable)

ELEMECML 6230 (210:230). Advanced Techniques in Instructional Management — 3 hrs.

Data-driven applications of skills, methods and strategies for improved personal and systemic professional practices in elementary and middle level classrooms. Preventive, supportive, corrective, adaptive management techniques for meeting the needs of diverse learners. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 6201 (210:201) or consent of the head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6236. Assessment in Early Childhood — 3 hrs.

Uses and interpretations of formal and informal measures to assess physical, social, intellectual and emotional development in young children, including English language learners and children with special needs. Program evaluation will be addressed. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 6201 (210:201). (Variable)

ELEMECML 6242 (210:242). Analysis and Improvement of Science Instruction in the Elementary School — 3 hrs.

Application of current research and national standards regarding attitudes, process skills, inquiry, and essential knowledge to the analysis and improvement of science curriculum including the learning cycle, unifying themes, creativity, and differentiated instruction. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Elementary Education Master's Program M.A.E.) or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6243 (210:243). Analysis and Improvement of Social Studies Instruction in the Elementary School — 3 hrs.

Assists teacher in exploring historical and current practices in social studies to create new approaches by using available resources and ideas. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4143/5143 (210:143g) or ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g) or consent of department. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6270 (210:270). Recent Developments in Middle Level Curriculum — 3 hrs.

Recent developments regarding curricular decision making, organizational structures, and instructional strategies appropriate for middle and junior high schools based on the developmental characteristics of young adolescents. (Variable)

ELEMECML 6285 (210:285). Readings in Education — 1-3 hrs.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 6289 (210:289). Seminar in Education — 3 hrs.

Special topics listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 6297 (210:297). Practicum — 2-3 hrs.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 6299 (210:299). Research — 1-6 hrs.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ELEMECML 7352 (210:352). Curriculum Theory and Development — 3 hrs.

Assists the advanced graduate student in viewing, analyzing, and interpreting the curriculum and instruction program of an educational institution and in developing skills for implementing change. (Variable)

ELEMECML 7354 (210:354). Curriculum Implementation and Evaluation — 3 hrs.

Exploration of systems for program evaluation and revision and the dynamics of change processes. (Variable)

ELEMECML 7389 (210:389). Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction — 3 hrs.

Intensive study and seminar presentations of current issues, trends, procedures, and obstacles to change in curriculum and instructional practice. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status or consent of department. (Variable)

ELEMECML 7397 (210:397). Practicum in Curriculum and Instruction — 2-4 hrs.

Supervised practice in working as a co-facilitator and/or as a facilitator in program evaluation and revision and/or instructional design and improvement in an educational setting. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 7352 (210:352); and consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Instructional Technology Courses

INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). Secondary Educational Technology and Design — 2 hrs.

Design and production of media and the operation of hardware and software for grades 5-12 educational use. Includes selection and use of various educational technologies within an instructional design framework. The following majors are waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020): Department of Technology majors, Music Education majors, Art Education majors, Secondary Science teaching majors (Science Education, biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics), Secondary Business Education teaching majors, Modern Language education majors. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 1030 (240:030). Creating Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments — 3 hrs.

Students explore how project, problem and inquiry-based learning can be enhanced through technology. Using research as the foundation, students will experience and design blended learning environments where technology tools expand students' opportunities to learn and create. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031). (Spring)

INSTTECH 1031 (240:031). Educational Technology and Design — 3 hrs.

Selection and use of various educational technologies within an instructional design framework. Includes the design and production of media and the operation of hardware and software for Pre-K-8 educational use. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 4110/5110. Developing and Designing Online Learning — 3 hrs.

Explore online learning and the special needs/concerns of teaching at a distance. Students will be actively involved in creating effective distance education; engaging online learners; addressing learner needs, and fostering interactive learning environments. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Spring)

INSTTECH 4131/5131 (240:131g). Exploring Issues and Trends in Instructional Technology — 3 hrs.

This course prepares educators to critically examine contemporary issues, current research, and emerging trends in instructional technology. It involves investigation of historical technology uses, impact of emerging technologies on teaching and learning, and strategies for making informed decisions concerning equity, ethics, enhancing the curriculum. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

INSTTECH 4138/5138 (240:138g). Understanding Visual Literacy — 3 hrs.

Familiarizes students with the definition and concepts of visual literacy, the impact of visual images on our culture, the creation and use of visuals, the inclusion of visuals in instruction, and teaching critical viewing skills to various audiences. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

INSTTECH 4139/5139 (240:139g). Planning and Producing Instructional Media — 3 hrs.

Teaches planning and production steps essential for creating instructional multimedia projects. Students produce a real-world instructional multimedia product using the framework of the AECT instructional technology standards. Lab as arranged. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031) or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 4153/5153 (240:153g). Using Digital and Social Media in Education — 3 hrs.

Integrating leading-edge research about emerging digital and social media with hands-on experience. Study of emerging applications and instructional implementations. Students create an interactive instructional environment and document their pedagogical choices. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 1030 (240:030) or INSTTECH 4139/5139 (240:139g); junior standing; consent of instructor. (Fall)

INSTTECH 4160 (240:160). Instructional Technology Projects — 1-4 hrs.

Independent instructional technology projects. Credit to be determined at time of registration; project, credit and evaluation criteria require advance consent of instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 4170/5170 (240:170g). Supporting Learning with Dynamic Web Design — 3 hrs.

Focuses on the evaluation and design of electronically-produced materials. Provides students with opportunities to apply basic visual design principles to the development of web-based instructional media. Includes hands-on experience with web site design. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

INSTTECH 4186/5186. Studies in Instructional Technology — 1-3 hrs.

Individualized study of a specific problem or application in an area as determined by instructor and student. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 4189 (240:189). Readings in Instructional Technology — 1-3 hrs.

Independent instructional technology projects. Credit to be determined at time of registration; project, credit and evaluation criteria require advance consent of instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours for any section. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6205 (240:205). Instructional Computing Design — 3 hrs.

Evaluation and design of computer-based instructional materials. Involves hands-on experience in designing computer-based lessons and/or tutorials. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 6240 (240:240). (Spring and Summer)

INSTTECH 6208. Enhancing Learning Through Action Research — 3 hrs.

Engages in critical reflection to change, and designs and conducts a research cycle of acting, observing, and reflecting. Provides the basis for planning and completing action research. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 6240 (240:240). (Fall)

INSTTECH 6232 (240:232). Selecting and Integrating Instructional Technology — 3 hrs.

Examines new technologies that generate need for new literacies for 21st century students. Includes procedures for selection and integration of instructional technologies to support learning. (Fall)

INSTTECH 6237 (240:237). Leading Change Through Instructional Technology — 3 hrs.

Explores leading change towards 21st century learning. Engages in the processes of technology planning, management, and support in both theory and through practical applications. (Fall)

INSTTECH 6240 (240:240). Understanding Instructional Design — 3 hrs.

Students will apply a systematic instructional design model from the initial analysis through design, development and evaluation. Students will master the fundamental practices upon which the instructional design process is based. (Spring)

INSTTECH 6245 (240:245). Applying Instructional Design — 3 hrs.

Case-based analysis of instructional design scenarios and application of current research and theory into the instructional design process. Prerequisite(s): INSTTECH 6240 (240:240). (Variable)

INSTTECH 6250. Writing a Graduate Paper/ePortfolio — 3 hrs.

Refines skills in writing a Masters Literature Review: researching, reading, writing and formatting a paper. Masters ePortfolio is organized, formatted and development begins. (Fall)

INSTTECH 6260 (240:260). Advanced Instructional Technology Projects — 1-4 hrs.

Independent instructional technology projects. Credit to be determined at time of registration; project, credit and evaluation criteria require advance consent of instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6285 (240:285). Readings in Instructional Technology — 1-3 hrs.

Reviews individualized selected readings in an area of emphasis as determined by instructor and student. May be repeated for maximum of 3 hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6286 (240:286). Studies in Instructional Technology — 1-3 hrs.

Individualized study of a specific problem or application in an area as determined by instructor and student. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6289 (240:289). Seminar in Instructional Technology — 2 hrs.

Refines the necessary skills to write a Master's paper; includes researching, reading, writing, and formatting the paper. May not be repeated. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6297 (240:297). Practicum in Instructional Technology — 2-3 hrs.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 6299 (240:299). Research — 3 hrs.

Students will complete their masters literature review/project report/original research/journal article during this course. It should be taken in the final semester of your program. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

INSTTECH 7340 (240:340). Designing Instructional Systems — 3 hrs.

Application of current research and theory to the instructional design process. Systematic process of translating principles of learning and instruction, employing several instructional design models. (Variable)

Literacy Education Courses

LITED 1044 (230:044). Children's Literature — 3 hrs.

Evaluation, selection, and teaching of literature in the elementary school language arts program. Prerequisite(s): must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

LITED 3115 (230:115). Methods of Teaching Early Literacy — 3 hrs.

Reading and writing instruction in grades PK-3, with an emphasis on integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as integration across content areas. Prerequisite(s): Registration requires admission to Teacher Education program. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044). Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 3116 (230:116). Methods of Teaching Content Literacy in the Intermediate Grades — 3 hrs.

Reading and writing instruction in grades 3-6, with an emphasis on integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as integration across content areas. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 4150/5150 (210:152g); LITED 1044 (230:044); junior standing. Requires admission to teacher education program. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): LITED 3115 (230:115). Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 3119 (230:119). Language Development and Emergent Literacy — 3 hrs.

Theories underlying young children's acquisition of oral language and early reading and writing. Emphasis on implications for literacy curriculum in the primary grades. Prerequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044) and one of the following: LITED 3115 (230:115), LITED 3116 (230:116) or LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g) or consent of instructor; junior standing. Students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. (Variable)

LITED 3121 (230:121). Advanced Children's Literature — 3 hrs.

Issues and trends in children's literature, including use in elementary school programs. Focus on values, uses, and controversies related to children's literature by and about major American minority groups, including ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic minorities. Prerequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044); junior standing. Students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. (Variable)

LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g). Methods of Teaching Content Literacy at the Middle and Secondary Levels — 3 hrs.

Literacy instruction in the middle and secondary grades, including understanding the reading process, literacy across the curriculum, improving fluency, and assessment of literacy. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Registration requires admission to Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall and Spring)

LITED 4140/5140. Assessment and Evaluation of Literacy — 3 hrs.

Introductory course in evaluating reading, writing, and language of individual children through formative and summative assessments and instruction within a classroom setting. Includes group and individual evaluation, informal assessment procedures, selection of materials, and instructional strategies to meet the needs of individual learners. Prerequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044) or ENGLISH 4940/5940 (620:165g); LITED 3115 (230:115), LITED 3116 (230:116), or LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g); LITED 3119 (230:119) or LITED 3121 (230:121) or TESOL 4510/5510 (630:165g); or consent of instructor; junior standing. Students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. Priority registration for Literacy Education minors and English teaching majors and minors. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 4147/5147. Advanced Literacy Practices — 3 hrs.

Selection, implementation, and interpretation of a variety of reading, writing, and language arts assessment procedures; small group literacy instruction, and, the development and implementation of effective individualized instructional programs. Prerequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044) or ENGLISH 4940/5940 (620:165g)/5940; LITED 3115 (230:115), LITED 3116 (230:116), or LITED 4117/5117 (230:117g); LITED 3119 (230:119) or LITED 3121 (230:121); LITED 4140/5140/5140; or consent of instructor; junior standing. Students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. Priority registration for Literacy Education minors and English teaching majors and minors. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 4155/5155 (230:155g). English Language Structures and Usage for K-8 Educators — 1 hr.

The study of English language structures, usage, conventions, and variations across contexts. Emphasis on learning to teach these concepts to K-8 students, including English Language Learners. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Must have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. Priority registration for Middle Level Education Dual majors. (Fall and Spring)

LITED 4192/5192. Experience in Literacy: Tutoring — 3 hrs.

Supervised tutoring in the University Reading Center or in a public school reading center. Prerequisite(s): LITED 4140/5140; junior standing. For the Literacy Eduation Minor, students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. Corequisite(s): LITED 4147/5147. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 4193/5193 (230:193g). Experience in Literacy: Field — 1-2 hrs.

Supervised experience teaching in elementary or secondary reading programs. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Students must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or above in Literacy Education minor courses numbered LITED 3119 (230:119) or above and have a cumulative and UNI GPA of 3.00 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 6212 (230:212). Methods and Materials in Literacy Education — 3 hrs.

Integrated approach to language learning within and across grades K-12, with a strong emphasis on reading and writing connections within content areas and across children's and young adult literature. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing; previous course work in literacy education or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6238 (230:238). Advanced Assessment and Evaluation of Literacy Development — 3 hrs.

Experience in assessment and evaluation of literacy processes. An in depth examination of the interrelationship of assessment and evaluation to literacy development including current issues and practices. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing, previous course work in literacy education, or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6239 (230:239). Advanced Literacy Studies — 3 hrs.

Students locate, read, examine, analyze, and evaluate a variety of historical and contemporary literacy research pieces; make plans for research studies and write literature reviews, conference and grant proposals. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6240 (230:240). Language Development and Variability — 3 hrs.

Exploration of research on factors generally associated with variability in language and literacy development, on methods designed to promote language and literacy development, and on roles of teachers and parents in promoting this development in children with differences. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing, previous course work in literacy education, or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6245 (230:245). Ideological, Cultural, and Sociopolitical Issues in Children's Literature — 3 hrs.

Advanced literacy course exploring ideological, cultural, social, and political issues in children's literature. Study in sociocultural contexts of literacy instruction, with critical analysis of literature as an instrument to inform and transform life as well as learning. Prerequisite(s): LITED 1044 (230:044) or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6260 (230:260). Roles of the Reading Specialist — 3 hrs.

Exploration of the five major leadership roles required of school personnel who serve as reading and language arts specialists. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6289 (230:289). Seminar — 2-4 hrs.

Seminar topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 6290 (230:290). Practicum — 2-4 hrs.

Supervised experience in teaching and/or supervision of instruction. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 6299 (230:299). Research — 1-6 hrs.

Intended as the final course in the Curriculum and Instruction: Literacy Education program; focuses on completion of final research project and preparation for comprehensive examination in a collaborative seminar setting. Thesis requires a total of 6 hours. Non-thesis requires a total of 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

LITED 6301. Reading Recovery Teacher Clinical I — 3 hrs.

Participants in this course will develop understanding and expertise in: administering and analyzing the Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement, teaching Reading Recovery children, and understanding the theoretical basis of Reading Recovery instruction. Prerequisite(s): students must be hired for the position of Reading Recovery teacher in a school. (Fall)

LITED 6302. Reading Recovery Teacher Clinical II — 3 hrs.

Participants in this course will continue to develop deep understanding and expertise in teaching Reading Recovery children and in understanding the theoretical basis of Reading Recovery instruction. Prerequisite(s): students are required to have successfully completed LITED 6301 Reading Recovery Teacher Clinical I. (Spring)

LITED 7302 (230:302). Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Clinical I — 3 hrs.

Participants in this course will develop expertise in administering and analyzing the Observation Survey, teaching Reading Recovery children, and understanding the theoretical basis of Reading Recovery instruction. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires admittance to Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Training. Requirements for admission to Reading Recovery Teacher Leader training include completion of a Master's degree in education or a related area. Successful completion of the Reading Recovery Teacher Leader training is based on successful completion of all the training courses. (Fall)

LITED 7303 (230:303). Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Clinical II — 3 hrs.

Participants will continue to learn how to teach using Reading Recovery instructional practices. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires admittance to Reading Recovery Teacher leader Training and successful completion of LITED 7302 (230:302). Requirements for admission to Reading Recovery Teacher Leader training include completion of a Master's degree in education or a related area. Successful completion of the Reading Recovery Teacher Leader training is based on successful completion of all the training courses. (Spring)

LITED 7304 (230:304). Literacy Leadership I — 3 hrs.

Participants will develop skills required for the role of Reading Recovery teacher leader, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) coach, or literacy coach in a school. This course includes both classes that meet regularly and field experiences. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires admission to the Reading Recovery teacher leader training program, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy Coach program, or an Ed.D. program with experience as a literacy teacher and permission of the instructor. (Fall)

LITED 7305 (230:305). Literacy Leadership II — 3 hrs.

Participants will develop skills required for the role of Reading Recovery teacher leader, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) coach, or literacy coach in a school. This course includes both classes that meet regularly and field experiences. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires admission to the Reading Recovery teacher leader training program, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy Coach program, or an Ed.D. program with experience as a literacy teacher and permission of the instructor. Admission to this course also requires successful completion of the LITED 7304 (230:304) course. (Spring)

LITED 7306 (230:306). Theories of Reading Difficulties — 3 hrs.

Students will learn theories and research about learning development, reading development, and reading difficulties. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires successful completion of the course LITED 7307 (230:307). Admission to this course requires admission to the Reading Recovery teacher leader training program, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy Coach program, or an Ed.D. program with experience as a literacy teacher and permission of the instructor. (Spring)

LITED 7307 (230:307). Theories of Reading and Writing Processes — 3 hrs.

Students will learn about theories of reading and writing development, including the topics of oral language, written language, phonology and orthography, and comprehending. Prerequisite(s): admission to this course requires admission to the Reading Recovery teacher leader training program, Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy Coach program, or an Ed.D. program with experience as a literacy teacher and permission of the instructor. (Fall)

LITED 7310. Coaching in the Comprehensive Literacy Model — 3 hrs.

Coaching in the Comprehensive Literacy Model (CLM) is designed to begin the coursework for preparing a CLM coach for a school. CLM coaches support schools in implementing a seamless approach for comprehensive school improvement. Students will learn to use the Framework for Literacy, which uses a workshop approach for differentiating instruction to meet the needs of all students, including whole-group, small group, and one-to-one conferences. Schedules and organization techniques are provided and literacy components are discussed, including guided reading, literature discussion groups, shared reading, mini-lessons, focus units, and other literacy-related topics. Other issues addressed include: literacy coaching, collaborative learning communities, intervention groups for struggling learners, and assessment walls for progress monitoring. Video examples and materials from Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) schools are used to illustrate how teachers are implementing comprehensive literacy components into the school day. Prerequisite(s): Master's Degree and accepted application from a school district or area education agency (or with Instructor's permission). (Summer)

LITED 7320. Coaching in the Comprehensive Intervention Model — 3 hrs.

Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) is the initial course for the preparation of CIM coaches who will provide professional development to CIM teachers in schools. The course focuses on how schools can implement the Comprehensive Intervention Model with a range of literacy interventions for meeting the diverse needs of struggling learners. Comprehensive intervention provides for the unique differences encountered among increasingly diverse schools. A comprehensive intervention plan enables school teams to be decision makers in planning and providing the most effective and highly tailored interventions based on the needs in a school. Highly tailored layers of support are provided to change the achievement profile of a school. The course will focus on differentiating reading and writing instruction within various settings, including supplemental and classroom for meeting the needs of struggling learners. The course will include details for implementing a portfolio of small group interventions, collaborating with teachers across intervention approaches, and using assessment data to monitor students' progress. An emphasis will be placed on the Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) as a Response to Intervention method. Prerequisite(s): Master's Degree and accepted application from a school district or area education agency or with Instructor's permission. (Summer)

LITED 7354 (230:354). Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Reading/Language Arts — 3 hrs.

Current models, methodologies, and decision-making approaches for development and evaluation of K-12 programs. Prerequisite(s): ELEMECML 7352 (210:352). (Variable)

LITED 7389 (230:389). Seminar in Reading — 1 hr.

Series of one-hour seminars to accompany doctoral work in statistics, research, and practicum experiences. May be repeated for maximum of 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

LITED 7397 (230:397). Practicum in Reading — 1-4 hrs.

Supervised professional experience teaching reading education courses at the university level or participating in reading program supervision and consulting within a school district. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

Safety Education Courses

SAFETYED 4130/5130 (300:130g). Driver and Traffic Safety I — 3 hrs.

Classroom and practice driving units; safety education as a social problem; development of safety skills, habits, attitudes, and ideals; accident causes; study of research. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SAFETYED 4131/5131 (300:131g). Driver and Traffic Safety II — 3 hrs.

Classroom and in-the-car techniques of imparting instruction to high school students taking driver education. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SAFETYED 4132/5132 (300:132g). Directing the Safety Program — 2 hrs.

Organization and administration of safety programs through the entire school system. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SAFETYED 4140/5140 (300:140g). Traffic Law Enforcement — 3 hrs.

Acquaints safety and driver education teachers with the purposes of traffic law enforcement and traffic engineering. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SAFETYED 4192/5192 (300:192g). Experience in Safety Education — 2-4 hrs.

Offered in various specialized fields; may be repeated once for credit in a different area. Maximum of 8 hours credit. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

School Library Studies Courses

SLS 1010 (350:010). Library Orientation — 1 hr.

Practical working knowledge of the library and its resources. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students. (Variable)

SLS 3112 (350:112). Library Information Sources — 1 hr.

Utilization of indexes, documents, and reference sources in specific subject areas; performance of information searches on specialized topics. Open to juniors/seniors with declared majors. (Not open to School Library Studies majors.) (Variable)

SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g). Introduction to the School Library Program — 3 hrs.

Survey of school librarianship, functions of the school library, national and state professional guidelines and standards, ethical and legal issues; includes a field experience collection management project in a selected school library. Must be taken in the first semester. Prerequisite(s): junior standing; consent of instructor. (Variable)

SLS 4115/5115 (350:115g). Organization of Information — 3 hrs.

Application of standards of descriptive cataloging and MARC record for automated systems. Application of Dewey Decimal Classification and standard subject headings for school library catalogs. Administration of library automation systems for management of collections. Introduction of tagging and other web-based methods for organization of information and information sources. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g)/5114 (350:114) or consent of program coordinator. (Variable)

SLS 4132/5132 (350:132g). Library Resources for Children — 3 hrs.

Collection development process related to resources of elementary school libraries, with a focus on strategies for supporting students' reading motivation and reading comprehension. Roles of the teacher librarian as both information specialist and teacher. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g) or consent of instructor. (Variable)

SLS 4134/5134 (350:134g). Library Resources for Young Adults — 3 hrs.

Collection development process related to resources of secondary school libraries, with a focus on the roles of the teacher librarian as both information specialist and teacher. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g) or consent of instructor. (Variable)

SLS 6223 (350:223). School Library Curriculum Development — 3 hrs.

Collaborative role of the school teacher librarian in curriculum design. Study of curriculum frameworks and the curriculum integration of information process models, PK-12, with an emphasis on inquiry-based learning. Prerequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g). Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 4132/5132 (350:132g) or SLS 4134/5134 (350:134g) or SLS 6250 (350:250). (Variable)

SLS 6225 (350:225). Administration of the School Library Program — 3 hrs.

Management and leadership role of the school teacher librarian, including organizational strategies, planning, and policy development. Prerequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g). (Variable)

SLS 6230 (350:230). Technologies for Libraries — 3 hrs.

Emphasis on technologies for school libraries, including design specific to school library websites (Librarian as program administrator), web-based tools for teaching the inquiry processes (Librarian as teacher) and tools for organizing information for efficient user access (Librarian as information specialist). Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 4115/5115 (350:115g)/5115 (350:115). (Variable)

SLS 6250 (350:250). Reference Services and Information Retrieval — 3 hrs.

Collection management for print and electronic reference resources in elementary and secondary schools. Question-negotiation, search strategies, evaluation of information delivery systems in the context of inquiry based learning. Prerequisite(s): SLS 4115/5115 (350:115g). (Variable)

SLS 6289 (350:289). Seminar — 2-3 hrs.

Critical assessment of the elements of school library services such as Inquiry Learning at the building and system levels. May be repeated up to six hours with permission of the Division. Prerequisite(s): SLS 6223 (350:223); SLS 6250 (350:250). (Variable)

SLS 6290 (350:290). Practicum — 3 hrs.

Experience in the function of elementary and secondary school libraries. Principles of effective collaborative teaching and inquiry based learning. May be repeated up to six hours with permission of the Division. Prerequisite(s): SLS 4114/5114 (350:114g); SLS 6223 (350:223); or written consent of instructor. (Variable)

SLS 6295 (350:295). Research in Library and Information Science — 3 hrs.

Survey of basic research methodologies and critical evaluation of school library research studies. The use of the research process to develop a draft proposal for a research study, or project. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SLS 6250 (350:250). (Variable)

SLS 6299 (350:299). Research.

Focus on the process of completing the research study, project, or thesis. Must be taken during the semester when the study is completed and may be repeated. Student must enroll in at least 1 credit hour during the semester the study is completed. Prerequisite(s): SLS 6295 (350:295); consent of department. (Variable)