2014-16 Academic Catalog
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Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

(College of Social and Behavioral Sciences)

www.uni.edu/sac

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs and program certificates.  Specific requirements for these programs are listed within this Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology section in the following order:

  • Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)
    • Anthropology
    • Criminology
    • Sociology
  • Minors
    • Anthropology
    • Criminology
    • Sociology
  • Program Certificates
    • Crime Mapping and Analysis (also listed in Department of Geography)
    • Sociology of Inequality
    • Sociology of Family and Life Course
    • Sociology of Gender and Culture
    • Sociology of Race/Ethnicity and Immigration

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

Anthropology Major

The Anthropology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Required
Sociology and Anthropology:
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research3
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
ANTH 1001 (990:010)Human Origins3
ANTH 1002 (990:011)Culture, Nature, and Society3
ANTH 3001 (990:177)Language and Culture3
ANTH 3103 (990:161)Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft3
or ANTH 3101/5101 (990:164g) Psychological Anthropology
or ANTH 3102/5102 (990:168g) Culture, Disease, and Healing
or ANTH 3104/5104 (990:167g) Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
ANTH 3201 (990:151)Physical Anthropology: History and Theory3
or ANTH 3202/5202 (990:152g) Human Biological Variation
ANTH 3301 (990:141)Mesoamerica and the Near East3
or ANTH 3302 (990:142) Archaeology of the New World
or ANTH 3303 (990:143) Archaeology of the Old World
ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g)Anthropological Theory3
Electives in anthropology9
Electives in sociology3
Total Hours36

Criminology Major

The Criminology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. 

In order to graduate with a major in Criminology, students must take at least 12 credit hours of criminology courses at UNI.

Required
Sociology and Criminology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research3
or PSYCH 3003 (400:102) Psychological Statistics
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
CRIM 4575 (982:175)Senior Seminar in Criminology3
Group 1 - Crime and Criminals
Select from the following: 9-12
Criminology:
White Collar Crime
Juvenile Delinquency
Crime and Community
Crime and Social Inequality
Victimology
Youth Gangs
Homicide
Social Deviance and Control
Women, Crime and Society
Drugs, Crime, and Society
Topics in Criminology (as designated)
Group 2 - Policy, Law and Justice
Select from the following: 6-9
Criminology:
Crime Analysis
Community Corrections
Juvenile Justice
Criminal Court System
Crime and Punishment
Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice
Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice
Police and Society
Law and Society
Crime and Public Policy
Topics in Criminology (as designated)
Group 3 - Interdisciplinary and Applied Studies in Criminology
Select from the following: 3-6
Criminology:
Readings in Criminology
Psychology:
Drugs and Individual Behavior
Abnormal Psychology
Political Science:
Introduction to Public Administration
Law and the Courts
Civil Rights and Liberties
Problems in Juvenile and Family Law
Terrorism and Insurgency
Sociology:
Social Problems
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Immigration and Transnationalism
Criminology:
Cooperative Education
Independent Study
Criminology Internship
Anthropology:
Forensic Anthropology
Total hours39

*

PSYCH 3003 (400:102) is a 4-hour course. PSYCH 3003 (400:102) has the following prerequisites: PSYCH 1001 (400:001); PSYCH 3002 (400:101); one college-level mathematics course or consent of instructor.

Note: Students majoring in criminology should take CRIM 2022 (982:022) and CRIM 2025 (982:025) before taking any 100-level courses within the major (see course descriptions for 4-digit numbers associated with these 100-level courses).

Graduation note: In order to graduate with a major in criminology, students must achieve a total major GPA of at least 2.33.

Sociology Major

The Sociology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

I. Required courses:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g)The Development of Social Theories3
Select one of the following:3
Statistics for Social Research
Psychological Statistics
II. Electives (no more than 6 hours may be 1000- or 2000-level)18
Social Problems
Sociology of Families
Social Movements
Social Psychology
Language and Culture
Social Gerontology
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Social Inequality
Men and Masculinities
Sociology of Culture
Health, Illness, and Dying
Immigration and Transnationalism
Sociology of Religion
Conflict Resolution
Culture, Disease, and Healing
Readings in Sociology
Seminar in Sociology
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Qualitative Research Methods
Social Data Analysis
Sociology of Gender
Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences
Crime and Social Inequality
Women, Crime and Society
III. Professional Development elective:3
Theory and Practice in Applied Settings
Research Experience in Sociology
Cooperative Education
Independent Study
Career and Professional Development
Sociology Internship
Total Hours33

Minors

Anthropology Minor

Required
Anthropology:
ANTH 1001 (990:010)Human Origins3
ANTH 1002 (990:011)Culture, Nature, and Society3
ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g)Anthropological Theory3
Electives in anthropology9
Total Hours18

Criminology Minor

Required:
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
Criminology:
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
Electives:
Nine hours of courses with CRIM prefix9
Total Hours18

Sociology Minor

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
Electives in sociology (SOC prefix) 15
Total Hours21

Notes:

Students are advised to take Introduction to Sociology and Research Methods before taking any other sociology courses.

Not more than 9 semester hours of credit from SOC 3120/5120 (980:145g) , SOC 3100/5100 (980:184g) , SOC 3130/5130 (980:189g) , and SOC 4198 (980:198) may be applied toward the minor, except with the approval of your advisor and department head.

 

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following program certificates, contact the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Certificate in Crime Mapping and Analysis

This interdisciplinary program certificate provides students with both theoretical and applied training in spatial mapping and the analysis of crime data. This program certificate is offered jointly by the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology and Department of Geography.

Required
Criminology:
CRIM 2134Crime Analysis3
CRIM 4224/5224 (982:124g)Police and Society3
Geography:
GEOG 3310 (970:164)Geographic Information Systems I3
GEOG 4310/5310 (970:170g)GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)3
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research3
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
Total Hours18

 

Certificate in Sociology of Inequality

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: **9
Sociology:
Social Movements
Social Inequality
Men and Masculinities
Immigration and Transnationalism
Immigration and Transnationalism
Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences
Criminology:
Crime and Social Inequality ***
Total Hours15

*

Students are advised to take SOC 1000 (980:001) and SOC 2010 (980:108) before taking any of the courses listed below.

**

Students may not count any course toward more than two certificates.

***

CRIM 3151 (982:151) has prerequisites SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022) and junior standing.

Certificate in Sociology of Family and Life Course

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: **9
Philosophy and World Religions:
Perspectives on Death and Dying
Anthropology:
Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft
Sociology:
Sociology of Families
Social Gerontology
Health, Illness, and Dying
Sociology of Religion
Sociology of Gender
Criminology:
Juvenile Delinquency ***
Total Hours15

*

Students are advised to take SOC 1000 (980:001) and SOC 2010 (980:108) before taking any of the courses listed below.

**

Students may not count any course toward more than two certificates.

***

CRIM 2127 (982:127) has prerequisites of CRIM 2025 (982:025) and SOC 1000 (980:001).


Certificate in Sociology of Gender and Culture

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: *9
Sociology:
Social Psychology
Language and Culture
Men and Masculinities
Sociology of Culture
Culture, Disease, and Healing
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Sociology of Gender
Criminology:
Women, Crime and Society
Total Hours15

*

Students are advised to take Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1000 (980:001)) and Research Methods (SOC 2010 (980:108)) before taking any of the courses listed below.

**

Students may not count any course toward more than two certificates.

***

 Course CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g) has prerequisites of SOC 1000 (980:001); SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing.

Certificate in Sociology of Race/Ethnicity and Immigration

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: *9
Sociology:
Social Movements
Social Psychology
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Sociology of Culture
Health, Illness, and Dying
Immigration and Transnationalism
Immigration and Transnationalism
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Total Hours15

*

Students are advised to take SOC 1000 (980:001) and SOC 2010 (980:108) before taking any of the courses listed below.

**

Students may not count any course toward more than two certificates.

 

 

 

Anthropology, B.A.

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
ANTH 1002 (990:011)3University Electives3
University Elective3Liberal Arts Core9
HUM 1021 (680:021)3ANTH 1001 (990:010)3
SOC 1000 (980:001)3 
Liberal Arts Core3 
 15 15
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
Content Area - Statistics3Content Area - Archaeology3
Anthropology Elective3Liberal Arts Core6
University Electives3University Electives6
Liberal Arts Core6 
 15 15
Junior
FallHoursSpringHours
Content Area - Culture3Liberal Arts Core3
University Electives3University Electives6
Liberal Arts Core6ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g)3
ANTH 3001 (990:177)3Content Area - Physical3
 15 15
Senior
FallHoursSpringHours
Anthropology Elective3Anthropology Elective6
Liberal Arts Core3University Electives9
University Electives9 
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120

 

 

 

Criminology, B.A.

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
COMM 1000 (48C:001)3Fine Arts3
ENGLISH 1005 (620:005)3Individual And Institutional Perspectives3
HUM 1021 (680:021)3STAT 1772 (800:072)3
SOC 1000 (980:001)3HUM 1022 (680:022)3
 CRIM 2022 (982:022)3
 12 15
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
Literature, Philosophy And Religion3Life Sciences4
Physical Sciences3Non-Western Cultures3
Topical Perspectives3University Electives9
University Electives3 
CRIM 2025 (982:025)3 
 15 16
Junior
FallHoursSpringHours
Group 1 Criminology Elective3Group 1 Criminology Elective3
Group 2 Criminology Elective3Group 3 Criminology Elective3
University Electives9University Electives6
HPELS 1010 (440:010)3SOC 2010 (980:108)3
 18 15
Senior
FallHoursSpringHours
Capstone Experience3Group 2 Criminology Elective3
Group 3 Criminology Elective3University Electives9
Group 1 Criminology Elective3CRIM 4575 (982:175)3
University Electives6 
 15 15
Total credit hours: 121

 

 

 

Sociology, B.A.

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
Liberal Arts Core9University Elective 3
University Elective3Liberal Arts Core9
SOC 1000 (980:001)3ANTH 1001 (990:010)3
 15 15
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
Liberal Arts Core6University Electives6
University Electives6Liberal Arts Core6
SOC 2010 (980:108)3SOC 2020 (980:080)3
 15 15
Junior
FallHoursSpringHours
Core in Sociology3Liberal Arts Core3
Liberal Arts Core3University Electives6
University Electives6Core in Sociology6
SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g)3 
 15 15
Senior
FallHoursSpringHours
Sociology Electives 6Sociology/Criminology Electives6
Liberal Arts Core3University Electives9
University Electives6 
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120


Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1001 (990:010). Human Origins — 3 hrs.

Introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology with emphases on evolutionary theory, variation and adaptation, primatology, paleoanthropology, animal and plant domestication, and the rise to early civilization. (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 1002 (990:011). Culture, Nature, and Society — 3 hrs.

Introduction to cross-cultural perspective on human behavior. Consideration of the nature of society and culture among diverse human groups, from hunter-gatherers to industrialized city dwellers, by examination of their technologies, economic systems, family life, political structures, art, languages, and religious beliefs and practices. Emphasis on non-Western societies. (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 2401. Tribal Religions — 3 hrs.

Tribal Religions is designed to provide students with an introduction to the religions and spirituality of indigenous societies from around the world. Special attention is given to the relationships between religion and the environment, and between religion and the social, political and economic organizations of a society. (Same as RELS 2401) (Fall)

ANTH 3001 (990:177). Language and Culture — 3 hrs.

Examination of how language use shapes and expresses cultural identity. Implications of linguistic diversity for world view, gender and ethnic identity, education, and cross-cultural communication. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011). (Same as SOC 3001 (980:177)) (Spring)

ANTH 3080/5080 (990:120g). Immigration and Transnationalism — 3 hrs.

Comparative multi-disciplinary perspective on international migration and immigrant settlement strategies, with a focus on Western Europe and the United States. Topics cover the main theoretical and contemporary debates within the field of international migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g)) (Spring)

ANTH 3101/5101 (990:164g). Psychological Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Psychological dimensions of sociocultural systems from a cross-cultural perspective. Analysis of universals and cultural variation in cognition, socialization, concepts of the self, emotion, and mental illness. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as PSYCH 4607/5607 (400:164g)) (Spring)

ANTH 3102/5102 (990:168g). Culture, Disease, and Healing — 3 hrs.

Introduction to medical anthropology through examination of the interactions among culture, disease, and healing. Emphasis on non-Western medical systems. Topics include development of medical anthropology; the social fabric of health; the cultural context of health, illness, and disease. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as SOC 3102/5102 (980:168g)) (Variable)

ANTH 3103 (990:161). Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft — 3 hrs.

This course emphasizes a comparative and anthropological approach to the study of religion, magic and witchcraft. Course content includes the study of classical theoretical frameworks that explain of religious beliefs and practices and in-depth discussions on diverse religious systems. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1002 (990:011) and junior standing; or consent of instructor. (Same as RELS 3103 (640:161)) (Spring)

ANTH 3104/5104 (990:167g). Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective — 3 hrs.

Evolutionary, biological, psychological, cognitive, social, and cultural theories of gender and gender inequality evaluated with respect to cross-cultural data. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as PSYCH 4608/5608 (400:167g) and SOC 3411/5411 (980:167g)) (Spring)

ANTH 3132 (990:132). Native North America — 3 hrs.

Ethnographic survey of sociocultural systems developed by Native Americans north of Mexico. Emphasis on relationships that exist among ecological factors, subsistence techniques, social organizations, and belief systems; and the impact interactions with European and U.S. societies had on Indian lifestyles. (Same as HUM 3132 (680:132)) (Variable)

ANTH 3137 (990:137). Native Central and South America — 3 hrs.

Ethnographic focus on the sociocultural systems of the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica, Amazon Basin, and the Andean Highlands. Emphasis on inter-relationships among environment, history, social organizations, and belief systems from a holistic and comparative perspective. (Same as HUM 3137 (680:137)) (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 3201 (990:151). Physical Anthropology: History and Theory — 3 hrs.

Historical perspective on the development of evolutionary thought and how it changed ideas in physical anthropology, including the theoretical foundations of the "modern synthesis", the race concept, primate studies, paleoanthropology, and human ecology and adaptation. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing. (Spring)

ANTH 3202/5202 (990:152g). Human Biological Variation — 3 hrs.

Exploration of the processes and origins of human biological variability, adaptability, and responses to a changing environment. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing. (Spring)

ANTH 3301 (990:141). Mesoamerica and the Near East — 3 hrs.

Beginnings of food production, rise of complex culture and collapse of cultural systems as interpreted through archaeological data. Comparative approach focusing on Mesoamerica and the Near East. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ANTH 3302 (990:142). Archaeology of the New World — 3 hrs.

Prehistory of North American Indians and major prehistoric cultures in Central and South America, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca, traced from earliest arrival of peoples in the New World to time of European contact. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ANTH 3303 (990:143). Archaeology of the Old World — 3 hrs.

Prehistory of Africa, Asia, Europe, and Australia from dawn of humanity to civilizations of Egypt, Indus Valley, Mesopotamia, and China. Emphasis also on prehistory of simple hunter-gatherer cultures in the Old World. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ANTH 3410/5410 (990:148g). Applied Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Consideration of application of anthropology in analyzing and addressing contemporary social problems. Topics include economic development, public health, ethnic relations, and education. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 3420 (990:155). Forensic Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to methods used in the recovery of unidentified human remains, their use in establishing identity, the post-mortem interval, pathological defects and traumatic insults and reconstructing the events surrounding death. Knowledge of the human skeletal anatomy preferred. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010). (Fall)

ANTH 3430 (990:144). Prehistory of the American Southwest — 3 hrs.

Archaeological record of the American Indians of New Mexico, Arizona, southern Colorado, and southern Utah from earliest big-game hunters of the region, through development of agriculture, rise of large pueblos and cliff dwellings, and enigmatic abandonments prior to conquest by the Spaniards. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 3431/5431 (990:171g). Interpreting the Archaeological Record — 3 hrs.

Anthropological approaches to archaeology, including history of research; formation of archaeological record; research design, data collection, artifact analysis, classification, interpretation, dating, and inference. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); ANTH 1002 (990:011); 3 hours of 100/3000/4000-level archaeology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Odd Falls)

ANTH 3440/5440 (990:125g). Introduction to Museum Studies — 3 hrs.

Exploration of history, public mission, working environment, and ethical issues of museums. Discussion of practical skills and theoretical issues of museum studies, exposing students to broad range of museum types and career opportunities. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as HIST 4020/5020 (960:125g)) (Variable)

ANTH 3441/5441 (990:162g). Crime, Law, and Justice: A Global Perspective — 3 hrs.

Exploration of similarities and diversity in crime, law, and social control in a cross-cultural and global perspective. Examination of case studies from traditional and contemporary; emphasis on theoretical approaches from anthropology, sociology, and criminology. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as CRIM 4262/5262 (982:162g)) (Variable)

ANTH 3450 (990:172). Archaeological Fieldwork — 3-8 hrs.

Introduction to field research techniques (survey, excavation, and mapping), laboratory processing, and hypothesis testing. Conducted in the field. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); consent of instructor. (Summer)

ANTH 3460 (990:153). Primate Behavior — 3 hrs.

Examination of behavior and appearance of nonhuman primates in response to environmental and social factors. Investigation of how diet, reproduction, and social interaction among prosimians, monkeys, and apes act as a foundation for interpreting the origins of humans and their behaviors. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010). (Fall)

ANTH 3470 (990:102). Conflict Resolution — 3 hrs.

Survey of social science theory and research in conflict resolution with emphasis on development of less destructive modes of problem solving in social formations. (Same as SW 3102 (450:102) and SOC 3090 (980:102)) (Variable)

ANTH 3501 (990:145). Research Experience in Anthropology — 1-3 hrs.

Research participation and/or independent supervised research in anthropology. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 15 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ANTH 3502 (990:184). Experience in Applied Anthropology — 1-6 hrs.

Work experience in applied anthropology. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ANTH 3503/5503 (990:189g). Readings in Anthropology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated only with consent of department. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in anthropology; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g). Anthropological Theory — 3 hrs.

Major theoretical developments in anthropology, including both historical and contemporary schools and trends. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Fall)

ANTH 4015/5015 (990:178g). Qualitative Research Methods — 3 hrs.

Development and application of the qualitative descriptive and analytic methods used in social science research. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. [Same as SOC 4015/5015 (980:178g)] (Fall)

ANTH 4016/5016 (990:180g). Seminar in Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Selected problems within one subfield of anthropology (cultural, physical, archaeological, or anthropological linguistics). Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): vary with topic; junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 4198 (990:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): written consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

Criminology Courses

CRIM 2022 (982:022). Criminal Justice System — 3 hrs.

Genesis, transformation, and day-to-day operation of criminal justice within our society; emphasis on interrelationships between specific stages in the crime-control process and the differences between U.S. and other criminal justice systems. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Spring)

CRIM 2025 (982:025). Criminology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the study of criminal behavior, with emphasis on social science approaches. Overview of types of crime, and theories, methods and data used to study crime. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2112 (982:112). White Collar Crime — 3 hrs.

Examination of theoretical definition, social impact, and changing relationship between current technological advancements and society's ability to both detect and punish white collar criminals. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2025 (982:025). (Variable)

CRIM 2127 (982:127). Juvenile Delinquency — 3 hrs.

Examination of the causes of delinquency in children, focusing on the effects of parenting, youth subcultures, and the media. Includes youth crimes, such as shoplifting and vandalism. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2025 (982:025). (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2134. Crime Analysis — 3 hrs.

Provides an introductory understanding of the history and methodology of examining crime information. Covers applied technical skills for managing, analyzing, and presenting data relevant to criminal justice agencies. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2020 (980:080) or STAT 1772 (800:072); sophomore standing. (Spring)

CRIM 2152 (982:152). Crime and Community — 3 hrs.

Exploration of the connection between community characteristics and crime. Students are presented with theories that address why some neighborhoods have concentrated crime and learn about what scholars, organizers, police, and politicians can do to reduce crime. (Fall)

CRIM 2217 (982:117). Community Corrections — 3 hrs.

Overview of sanctioning alternatives to imprisonment, including traditional probation and parole practices, as well as intermediate sanctions such as boot camps, electronic monitoring, fines, and intensive supervision. Sentencing will be discussed, as it influences probation/parole populations, as will the duties and responsibilities of probation and parole officers. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); sophomore standing. (Variable)

CRIM 2232 (982:132). Juvenile Justice — 3 hrs.

Examination of history, philosophies, and structure of juvenile justice system. Discussion of issues confronting legislators, the judiciary, and juvenile justice personnel in context of the need to provide treatment and protection of individual rights and liberty. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); sophomore standing. (Spring)

CRIM 3110/5110 (982:110g). State Crime — 3 hrs.

Survey of crimes of the state from a sociological and criminological perspective. Examination of historical and current cases at home and abroad. State crime theoretical perspectives used to understand the epistemological and etiological catalysts of state crime. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3130. Readings in Criminology — 1-3 hrs.

Individual readings in criminology. May be repeated with consent of department dead. Prerequisite(s): completed nine hours of criminology courses; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 3151 (982:151). Crime and Social Inequality — 3 hrs.

Introduction and review of major issues in the study of race, class, and crime. Examination of recent empirical research on social inequality, crime and the criminal justice system, as well as discussion of the relationship between inequality and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3179 (982:179). Cooperative Education — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated for a total of six credit hours (only three credit hours may count towards completion of the Criminology major). Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head and Cooperative Education Office. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

CRIM 3225. Criminal Court System — 3 hrs.

Designed to provide an analysis of the structure and function of the criminal court system in the U.S. Issues facing the system will be considered from historical and sociological perspectives. Ideals of the system will be compared to actual functioning. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 3226/5226 (982:126g). Crime and Punishment — 3 hrs.

Crime and punishment in American society, social history of punishment, theories of punishment, and how it relates to prison subcultures, crime rates, power relations, and cultural values. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 3314. Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice — 3 hrs.

Critical examination of ethical issues related to theoretical and practical issues facing law enforcement, legal, and corrections personnel, civil and criminal laws, medical field, academics, students, consumers, and the general public. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3319/5319 (982:119g). Victimology — 3 hrs.

Sociological investigation of institutional, economic, family, and personal victimization in American society with special attention to causes and processes of exploitation. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4122/5122 (982:122g). Youth Gangs — 3 hrs.

Origins and development of youth gangs in United States. Topics include recent emergence of gangs, especially in Iowa, relationship between drugs and violence and gang activity, and creation of social policy to prevent and control gang activity. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4137/5137 (982:137g). Homicide — 3 hrs.

Presentation of a description, discussion, and evaluation of the various types of homicide. Focus on the characteristics and backgrounds of homicidal offenders. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4198 (982:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 4216/5216 (982:116g). Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice — 3 hrs.

Examination of evolution and development of correctional treatment in United States, with special attention to description and evaluation of programs in juvenile and adult corrections. Alternatives to rehabilitative ideal; students are expected to develop other treatment models. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022) or CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4224/5224 (982:124g). Police and Society — 3 hrs.

Sociological investigation of evolution and structure of policing in United States society, with special attention to conflicts and imperatives which define police officers' roles and character of police work. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 4228/5228 (982:128g). Law and Society — 3 hrs.

Sociological analysis of judicial and jury decision making, legal structures, legislation, power, beliefs, conflict, and social change. Examination of criminal, civil, and public law. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4253/5253 (982:153g). Crime and Public Policy — 3 hrs.

Analysis of public policy issues related to crime and justice. Focus on the design, implementation and evaluation of public policy responses to criminal behavior. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4262/5262 (982:162g). Crime, Law, and Justice: A Global Perspective — 3 hrs.

Exploration of similarities and diversity in crime, law, and social control in a cross-cultural and global perspective. Examination of case studies from traditional and contemporary; emphasis on theoretical approaches from anthropology, sociology, and criminology. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3441/5441 (990:162g)) (Variable)

CRIM 4323/5323 (982:123g). Social Deviance and Control — 3 hrs.

Causes and consequences of socially-disapproved behavior; role of social control agencies in recruitment of deviant identities, management of and reaction to deviance; dynamics of labeling processes, and examination of social meaning of non-normative behavior. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g). Women, Crime and Society — 3 hrs.

Sociological analysis of women as victims, offenders, practitioners, and professionals in the criminal justice system. Examination of changing perceptions and behaviors of women in United States and other countries in relation to role expectations of women in criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4369/5369 (982:169g). Drugs, Crime, and Society — 3 hrs.

Examination of the relationship between crime and drugs in America. Covers the social and political history of drug use and control, the drug war, the lives of drug addicts, drug treatment policies, and possible revisions to America's drug laws. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4381/5381 (982:181g). Topics in Criminology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics; opportunity to focus previous course work and knowledge on a special issue in criminology. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 4485 (982:185). Criminology Internship — 3 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in a criminological or criminal justice related agency or position. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); CRIM 2025 (982:025); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

CRIM 4575 (982:175). Senior Seminar in Criminology — 3 hrs.

Designed for students nearing graduation. Offers an integration of the major concepts, theories, public policies, and components presented within the field of criminology. Prepares students for careers and the job market. Prerequisite(s): Criminology major only; senior standing or consent of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 6020. Program Evaluation — 3 hrs.

Qualitative and quantitative research designs and presentation of results, role of theory, managing stakeholders and budgets, ethical issues in evaluation research. Students will design an evaluation project and write a research report. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Fall)

CRIM 6251 (982:250). Crime and Society — 3 hrs.

Examination of the influence of social factors ranging from macro-level institutions to micro-level interactions, on criminal behavior and societal reactions to crime. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

CRIM 6260 (982:280). Seminar in Criminology — 3 hrs.

Allows for a greater depth of research and discussion into various specialty areas within the field of criminology. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): graduating standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

CRIM 6285 (982:285). Readings in Criminology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 6295. Field Placement — 3 hrs.

Field experience for students enrolled in the Criminology MA program. Students will complete a project connected to their field setting work. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): completion of 16 CRIM MA program credit hours or consent of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 6299 (982:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

Sociology Courses

SOC 1000 (980:001). Introduction to Sociology — 3 hrs.

Scientific approach to analysis and understanding of culture, human groups and institutions, personality, self, and social control. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 1060 (980:060). Social Problems — 3 hrs.

Analysis of nature and range of social problems arising in modern industrial society. Consideration given to conditions creating them and methods by which society seeks to cope with them. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2010 (980:108). Research Methods — 3 hrs.

Introduction to basic research methods used in social research. Conceptualization and operationalization of research problems. Examination of various research designs used to collect data. Introduction to sampling, instrumentation, data processing, data analysis, and report production. Priority to Sociology and Criminology majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2020 (980:080). Statistics for Social Research — 3 hrs.

Levels of measurement, frequency distributions, graphic representations, measures of average, measures of dispersion, cross-tabulation and measures of association, Pearson correlation, bivariate regression analysis, probability and hypothesis testing, inferences involving single sample and two samples, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite(s): completion of mathematics requirement for the Liberal Arts Core. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2030 (980:105g). Sociology of Families — 3 hrs.

Examination of social aspects of families by reviewing research on topics such as mate selection, marital quality, work and families, parenthood, divorce and remarriage, and family diversity. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Spring)

SOC 2040 (980:156g). Social Movements — 3 hrs.

Explores sociological and social psychological theories and concepts of the genesis, dynamics, and demise of modern social movements. Students also experience social movement dynamics first-hand by participating in a local social movement organization. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Variable)

SOC 2075 (980:100g). Social Psychology — 3 hrs.

Analysis of how people's thoughts, feelings, actions, and identities are influenced by social processes, interactions, and structures. Special attention to how people acquire, construct, and negotiate identities and how they are influenced by social realities of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in these processes. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). (Variable)

SOC 3001 (980:177). Language and Culture — 3 hrs.

Examination of how language use shapes and expresses cultural identity. Implications of linguistic diversity for world view, gender and ethnic identity, education, and cross-cultural communication. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011). (Same as ANTH 3001 (990:177)) (Spring)

SOC 3035/5035 (980:125g). Social Gerontology — 3 hrs.

Personal, interpersonal, and societal factors in the human aging process; emphasis on family, community, and governmental responsibility in defining and resolving problems of the aged in modern industrial society. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Fall)

SOC 3037/5037 (980:045g). Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice — 3 hrs.

The nature, origin, and consequences of race and ethnicity as sources of differentiation and inequality. Examines competing theories, the distribution of resources across groups, and social processes related to race, ethnicity, and social justice. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3045/5045 (980:135g). Social Inequality — 3 hrs.

The nature, origins, and reproduction of social inequalities. Examines the distribution of resources across groups and the processes that create it. Covers class, race, gender, and sexuality, and their relationship to each other. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Spring)

SOC 3050/5050 (980:129g). Men and Masculinities — 3 hrs.

Examination of men's lives from boys to men in such roles as friends, lovers, co-workers, family members, students, athletes, consumers, and soldiers. Consideration of diversities of male experiences through such categories as race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexual orientation, age, physical ability, and appearance. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3060/5060 (980:138g). Sociology of Culture — 3 hrs.

Culture permeates our lives, as a powerful and everyday force in society. Covers classical and contemporary theory, the high and popular culture debate, and the production and reception/consumption of culture. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SOC 2010 (980:108). (Spring)

SOC 3065/5065 (980:118g). Health, Illness, and Dying — 3 hrs.

Focus on the social organization of health care and the social psychological aspects of health, illness, and dying. Analyses of the social construction and distribution of illness, the structure of care, and the experience of health, illness, and dying. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g). The Development of Social Theories — 3 hrs.

Summary and critical appraisal of growth of sociological thought; historical consideration of social philosophy; introduction of leading sociological thinkers and their theories of society. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g). Immigration and Transnationalism — 3 hrs.

Comparative multi-disciplinary perspective on international migration and immigrant settlement strategies, with a focus on Western Europe and the United States. Topics cover the main theoretical and contemporary debates within the field of international migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3080/5080 (990:120g)) (Spring)

SOC 3085/5085 (980:172g). Sociology of Religion — 3 hrs.

Examination of social bases of religious institutions; factors in religious evolution and change; comparative analysis of religious organizations and religious behavior; functions of religion in the social structure. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); junior standing. (Fall)

SOC 3090 (980:102). Conflict Resolution — 3 hrs.

Survey of social science theory and research in conflict resolution with emphasis on development of less destructive modes of problem solving in social formations. (Same as ANTH 3470 (990:102) and SW 3102 (450:102)) (Variable)

SOC 3100/5100 (980:184g). Theory and Practice in Applied Settings — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in sociology. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 3102/5102 (980:168g). Culture, Disease, and Healing — 3 hrs.

Introduction to medical anthropology through examination of the interactions among culture, disease, and healing. Emphasis on non-Western medical systems. Topics include development of medical anthropology; the social fabric of health; the cultural context of health, illness, and disease. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3102/5102 (990:168g)) (Variable)

SOC 3120/5120 (980:145g). Research Experience in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

Research participation and/or independent supervised research. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 3130/5130 (980:189g). Readings in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated only with consent of department. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in sociology; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 3170/5170 (980:180g). Seminar in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

Selected topics; opportunity to correlate previous course work and knowledge in field of sociology. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108) or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3179 (980:179). Cooperative Education — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in cooperation with the Cooperative Education office. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head and Cooperative Education office. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 3411/5411 (980:167g). Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective — 3 hrs.

Evolutionary, biological, psychological, cognitive, social, and cultural theories of gender and gender inequality evaluated with respect to cross-cultural data. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 3104/5104 (990:167g) and PSYCH 4608/5608 (400:167g)) (Spring)

SOC 4015/5015 (980:178g). Qualitative Research Methods — 3 hrs.

Development and application of qualitative descriptive and analytic methods used in social science research. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 4015/5015 (990:178g)) (Fall)

SOC 4025/5025 (980:160g). Social Data Analysis — 3 hrs.

Intermediate methods of analysis using standing computer software program packages; descriptive and inferential statistics with controlled relationships, multivariate analysis, and scale analysis techniques. Primary orientation to survey data in social sciences. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2020 (980:080) or equivalent; junior standing. (Spring)

SOC 4050 (980:101). Sociology of Gender — 3 hrs.

Explores theories about gender differentiation and inequality. Analyzes the ways that gender influences social life within major institutions such as media, family, work, education, and politics. Focuses on the U.S. but also comparative. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001). Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SOC 2010 (980:108). (Fall)

SOC 4071/5071 (980:171g). Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences — 3 hrs.

Survey of theoretical approaches to study of sex and gender. Classical, structural, neo-Freudian, Marxist feminist, and radical approaches. Topics include work, family, religion, and sexuality. Prerequisite(s): SOC SCI 1020 (900:020) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011) or WGS 1040 (680:040); junior standing. (Spring)

SOC 4198 (980:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

SOC 4200. Career and Professional Development — 3 hrs.

Designed for students nearing graduation. Offers an integration of the major concepts, theories, and methods within sociology. Prepares students for life after graduation, including careers and the job market. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4485. Sociology Internship — 1-3 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in a sociology-related agency or position. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 6000 (980:211). Proseminar: Professional Development — 1 hr.

Helps graduate students acclimate to graduate school. Topics include strategies for reading, writing, time management, and professional and ethical behavior. (Fall)

SOC 6005 (980:212). Teaching Development — 3 hrs.

Prepares to teach introductory courses. Covers course preparation, teaching and evaluation strategies, classroom management, and demonstration of teaching skills. Students guest instruct and prepare a teaching portfolio. Prerequisite(s): completion of 16 credit hours in M.A. Sociology program or consent of instructor. (Spring)

SOC 6026 (980:260). Quantitative Analysis — 3 hrs.

Explores the principles of quantitative research, design and analysis including statistical techniques and presentation of results. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Spring)

SOC 6035 (980:278). Qualitative Research — 3 hrs.

Students design and carry out qualitative research projects. Learn to recruit study participants, conduct field work, interview, analyze data, build theory from data, and write up and present results. Covers the ethics involved in qualitative research. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Fall)

SOC 6170 (980:280). Seminar in Sociology — 3 hrs.

Topics include Sociological Theory, Deviant Behavior, Social Psychology, Social Stratification, Population, Sociological Research, Sociology of Religion, and others. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. Advanced course in specific scheduled area will be considered a prerequisite to that seminar. May be repeated on different topics. (Variable)

SOC 6252. Foundations of Social Theory — 3 hrs.

Description and analysis of main currents in sociological and criminological thought; principal theorists, major themes, schools, trends, issues, and debates in theory. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 6285 (980:285). Individual Readings — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

SOC 6293. Portfolio Development — 3 hrs.

Develop non-thesis project of a portfolio of pedagogical experiences for students desiring future teaching opportunities. Prerequisite(s): SOC 6005 (980:212); 16 hours in M.A. Sociology or consent of instructor. (Fall)

SOC 6297 (980:297). Practicum.

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

SOC 6299 (980:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)