2014-16 Academic Catalog
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Academic Regulations

Assessing Student Learning at UNI

UNI is committed to the assessment of student learning for purposes of the ongoing improvement of curriculum, programs, and services offered by the university and for accreditation processes. Students, faculty, staff, and administrators all play a role in student learning and all benefit from the creation of useful and meaningful assessment strategies and information.

Assessment activities at UNI are conducted by academic, administrative, and student affairs departments and units and may take the form of surveys, standardized tests, program evaluation forms, focus groups, student projects, student reflective activities, or any of a variety of other mechanisms. Some assessment instruments are given to specific groups of students; others are given to students randomly selected from a group or groups of students. Assessments may be administered both inside and outside of the classroom. Some assessments may be voluntary; others may be required.

Assessment-related data are kept confidential for individual students and are released only in aggregate form. Unless the assessment tool is also part of the assignments for a course, student performance in the assessment activity does not affect course grades or progress toward graduation.

Additional information about assessment policies and processes at UNI can be found on the website for the Office of Academic Assessment www.uni.edu/assessment. Questions about assessment at UNI can be directed to the Office of Academic Assessment and the Office of Institutional Research.

Academic Program: Student Load

The registration of every student is subject to the approval of her/his advisor.

The regular work of an undergraduate student for the fall or spring semester usually consists of 16 or 17 hours. First semester students are limited to a maximum of 18 hours.

Students may register for hours up to and including the limits indicated below without obtaining special permission:

  • Probation and Warning Students: 14 hours
  • All Other Undergraduates: 18 hours
  • Graduate Students: 15 hours

Undergraduate students who wish to register for an overload must contact the Office of the Registrar for approval prior to registration.

The normal maximum undergraduate student load during the summer session is one semester hour per week of instruction. Undergraduate students who wish to register for an overload must seek approval through the Office of the Registrar.

Graduate students who wish to register for an overload must submit an online graduate Student Request. A 3.00 GPA or above at UNI will usually be required for consideration of an overload request.

The maximum graduate student load during each semester of the academic year is 15 hours. Persons employed full-time should not register for more than 6 hours of graduate credit in any semester of the academic year.

The normal maximum graduate student load during the eight-week summer session is 9 hours; for shorter summer sessions the normal maximum load is 1 credit hour per week (i.e., 4 credit hours for a four-week session, 6 credit hours for a six-week session).

Exceptions to load restrictions for graduate students may be granted only by the Graduate College.

Classification of Students

Earned Semester Hours:

  • Freshman: less than 30 hours
  • Sophomore: 30-59 hours
  • Junior: 60-89 hours
  • Senior: 90 hours and over

Full-time/Part-time Status

Fall and Spring Semesters

Undergraduate

  • Full-time: 12 or more hours
  • 3/4 time: 9-11 hours
  • ½ time: 6-8 hours
  • Less than ½ time: 1-5 hours

Graduate

  • Full-time: 9 or more hours
  • 3/4 time: 7-8 hours
  • ½ time: 5-6 hours
  • Less than ½ time: 1-4 hours

Summer Session*

Undergraduate

  • Full-time: 9 hours
  • 3/4 time: 7-8 hours
  • ½ time: 5-6 hours
  • Less than ½ time: 1-4 hours

Graduate

  • Full-time: 7 hours
  • 3/4 time: 6 hours
  • ½ time: 4-5 hours
  • Less than ½ time: 1-3 hours
*

The above specifications apply only to eight-week courses. For the specifications which apply to four- or six-week session courses or a combination, consult the Office of the Registrar.

Change of Registration

Students may add classes, without approval, during the first seven (7) instructional class days of a semester. After the seventh instructional day of the semester and before the end of the third week of the semester, the student must have departmental approval to add a class. For the summer sessions a proportionately equal amount of time is allowed at the beginning of a session for adding classes.

Approval to add a course after the third week of the term is rare and is at the discretion of those approving the request. To add a class for credit after the third week of a term, the student must have the approval of the instructor, the student's advisor, and the head of the department in which the course is offered. Courses dropped after the deadline for dropping with a W (Withdrawn), which is 10 calendar days after the end of the first half of the fall and spring semesters and at the mid-point of half-semester and summer session courses, will be recorded as F (Failed) unless there are unusual circumstances and the student is doing passing work - in which case the instructor, the student's advisor, and the head of the department in which the courses are offered may approve a grade of W.

Pertinent dates governing the dropping and adding of courses, change to or from ungraded credit, and deadlines for making changes without charge are contained in the Schedule of Classes for that particular session.

Withdrawal Refunds or Fee Reduction

The information below applies to students who withdraw completely from school during a semester or summer session. Dropping one or more classes does not constitute a withdrawal unless students drop all classes for which they are registered.

If credit is earned during the period of enrollment, there is no refund or reduction of academic fees. For any two- or three-week session, there is no refund or reduction of academic fees. Room and board refunds are made according to agreement set out in the Contract for Room and Board.

Academic fees for a student enrolled for a regular semester or summer session who withdraws from the university will be reduced by the percentage indicated in the table below, beginning with the date of formal withdrawal with the Office of the Registrar. The amount of reduction will vary from 90 to 25 percent. For summer sessions, reduction percentages are on a day-count basis. (Please see the Schedule of Classes for information pertaining to a particular semester or summer session.)

Fall/Spring Semester

Percentage of fee reduction Withdrawal during specified weeks
100before classes begin
90first week
75second week
50third week
25fourth week
0after fourth week

Summer Session*

8-week or longer session

Percentage of fee reduction Withdrawal on day number
100before classes begin
901-3
754-6
507-8
259-10
011th day and beyond

6-week sessions

Percentage of fee reduction Withdrawal on day number
100before classes begin
901-2
753-4
505-6
257-8
09th day and beyond

4-week sessions

Percentage of fee reduction Withdrawal on day number
100before classes begin
901-2
753
504
255
06th day and beyond

*

No refund for two- or three-week sessions.

Withdrawal Procedure

A student who has started attending classes, and who finds it necessary to withdraw completely from school, initiates the withdrawal through the Office of the Registrar. Those students who live in residence halls must also cancel the housing contract through the hall coordinator of the residence hall in which they live. Those students receiving financial aid must contact the Office of Student Financial Aid. Students who wish to drop one or more courses and yet remain enrolled should consult the section Change of Registration.

A student who has registered but decides not to come to the University of Northern Iowa should advise the Office of the Registrar in writing at as early a date as possible of the need to cancel the registration, listing the reason(s) for withdrawing from the university. Withdrawal after classes begin will result in a tuition charge.

Student Identification Card (uCard)

Each new student receives an identification card (uCard) which is used throughout attendance at the university. A fee of $25.00 is charged to replace this uCard.

Policy on Class Attendance and Make-up Work (3.06)

Purpose:

It is the expressed focus of the University of Northern Iowa to further the educational development of each of its students. On occasion events will necessitate a student’s absence from class. This policy delineates the responsibilities of faculty members and students relating to class attendance and make-up work.

Definition:

The term “faculty member(s)” when used in this policy includes all regular, full-time faculty and all part-time course instructors, regardless of any other University employee classification which applies to the individual who teaches on a part-time basis.

Policy

A.    General Provisions

  1. Faculty members who choose to have policies related to attendance and make-up work must distribute those policies by the end of the first week of instruction.
  2. Students must adhere to each faculty member’s policies regarding attendance and make-up work.
  3. Faculty members who require attendance at activities or events that may conflict with a student’s otherwise regularly scheduled classes are expected to be reasonable in setting these requirements. If a faculty member will require student attendance at an activity or event outside of the regularly scheduled class period, the affected students must be provided with written notice at least 10 university class days in advance of the event during the fall or spring semester and by the third day of the course for any summer term class. The faculty member must provide each student with a notice that can be given to the faculty member who instructs another course affected by the required attendance of the student. It is then the student’s obligation to notify the other faculty member. In the case of extracurricular activities, a semester-long schedule should be prepared and distributed to the participating students at the beginning of the semester. It is the student’s obligation to provide the schedule to his/her other faculty members. A student may not be penalized for missing a course activity which is outside of their regularly scheduled class time and conflicts with his/her other scheduled courses.  If a faculty member has course activities which require attendance outside of scheduled class time, that faculty member must either provide the student an opportunity to make up the missed activity or event, or have in place a make-up policy that does not unjustly penalize a student for the missed activity or event.

B.    Absences

Occasionally, students will have reasonable cause to miss class. In order for both faculty members and students to plan effectively for these absences, the following procedures have been developed. Faculty members are encouraged to take into account the reason for an absence and make appropriate accommodations.   Students are still responsible for demonstrating achievement of course learning goals, even when absences are necessary or reasonable.  In situations with many absences, it may be most appropriate for the student to withdraw and retake the course in a future semester.

    1. In the case of mandatory excused absences, students must be allowed to make up missed work, complete an equivalent assignment, or the professor and the student may mutually agree to waive the assignment without penalty.  Faculty members have the discretion to determine what constitutes an appropriate make up work assignment.  Some course requirements may not require a make-up, such as in cases where the class work has a very minimal point value or where the course requirement of minimal point value is a part of a series of dropped assignments.

a.    The following absences must be excused:

  • Required university related absences, including but not limited to athletic games/matches/meets or their equivalents,
  • Absences due to military duty or veteran status, including service-related medical appointments where failure to appear might result in a loss of benefits.
  • Absences because of pregnancy or childbirth for as long as the student’s doctor deems the absences medically necessary.  When a student returns to school, she must be allowed to return to the same academic and extracurricular status as before her medical leave began.
  • Legally mandated absences such as jury duty or court subpoena.

b.    Students participating in required university or legally mandated absences must inform each faculty member of their known and anticipated absences as far in advance as possible.  Failure to inform faculty beforehand, when it is clearly possible to do so, may be treated as an unexcused absence.

c.    Faculty are not required to offer make-up work for extra credit tasks or assignments.

    2. Except as outlined in B1, faculty members have the discretion to determine the reasonableness of absences due to extenuating circumstances, either predetermined or unexpected.  Such absences include but are not limited to:  non-university sanctioned educationally appropriate events and activities (e.g. attendance at a professional conference, lecture on campus); illness; significant personal emergency; bereavement; obligatory religious observances, etc.

a. When an absence is deemed “reasonable”, the faculty member provides the student an opportunity to make up missed work, or has in place a make-up policy that does not unjustly penalize a student for the absence.

b. Remedies for missed work due to a “reasonable” absence include but are not limited to replacement assignments; policies which may allow students to drop a certain number of assignments or exams; policies which might average a score for a missed exam or account for it in other ways, etc.

c. In each of these remedies, a “reasonable” standard should apply.  In determining whether a remedy is reasonable, consideration should be given to the published syllabus.

C.     Make-up Work Grievances Arising from Absences

Should a faculty member refuse to allow a student to make up missed work, the faculty member’s decision can be appealed by the student using the grievance process outlined in Section 7 of 12.01 Student Academic Grievance Policy.

(Faculty Senate, approved December 2, 2013)
(President's Cabinet, approved March 3, 2014)
(President and Executive Management Team, approved March 4, 2014)

Course Credit Expectation

An academic semester contains 15 weeks (approximately 75 days) of instruction. Students enrolled in courses whose mode of instruction is lectural/discussion-based should expect to have 15 hours of class contact over the length of the semester for each hour of credit available. Students should plan to spend two hours of preparation per credit hour each week of the term. Students enrolled in courses whose mode of instruction is activity-based should expect to have 30 hours of class contact over the length of the semester for each hour of credit available. Students enrolled in courses offered on a shorter-term basis should expect their class contact to be proportionately increased to be comparable with semester long course expectations.

Final Examination Information

The final examination schedule applies both to faculty and students. Unless previous arrangements have been made, it is expected that the official schedule in the semester Schedule of Classes will be followed.

A comprehensive final examination, if required, must be administered at the time indicated on the final schedule. No final comprehensive examination shall be administered to a class within the last two weeks prior to the officially scheduled final examination period (excluding summer sessions or half-semester courses). In the week prior to the beginning of the final examination period, unit tests, papers, projects, and other assignments are permissible if announced in the course outline/assignment sheet/syllabus or prior to midterm.

For those classes which do not, in the instructor's judgment, require a final comprehensive examination the time of the officially-scheduled final examination will be used for other appropriate class activities, such as evaluation, reports, performance, or regular class work. Therefore, it is expected that the class will meet at the time of the officially-scheduled final examination, whether or not a final examination is administered.

The department heads shall have the responsibility for seeing that the final examination schedule and the relevant policies are followed. Students may report policy violations to the appropriate department head, in accordance with the university academic grievance procedures.

Policies Regarding Course Grades of Incomplete

To receive credit for course work a student is required to be in attendance for the full semester. Exceptions to this rule are rarely made.

Work lost by late enrollment or by change of registration may be made up for credit by an undergraduate student with the consent of the Office of Academic Affairs. Graduate students must have the consent of the Dean of the Graduate College.

Work lost because of absence due to illness, or other extenuating circumstances, may be made up, but arrangements for making up work missed are made between the student and the instructor.

Work left incomplete at the end of a semester or summer session will be reported as F (Failure) unless a report of I (Incomplete) has been authorized by the instructor. The Incomplete is restricted to students doing satisfactory work in the class who, because of extenuating circumstances, are unable to complete the work of the course. The Incomplete is limited to assigned work during the final sixth of the term. If a course is reported as Incomplete, a student is not prevented from registering for another course for which the incomplete course is a prerequisite.

Undergraduate

Work reported as Incomplete for undergraduate students in the fall semester must be completed by July 1st the next calendar year. Work reported Incomplete in the spring semester must be completed by December 1st. Work reported as Incomplete in the summer session must be completed by February 1st the next calendar year. The exact length of time to remove the Incomplete within the above guidelines, is set by agreement between the instructor and the student. If the work reported as Incomplete is not made up by the deadline noted above, it is automatically entered as an F (Failure) on the student's record. However, if for sufficient cause an Incomplete cannot be removed in the time allowed, a request for an extension of time may be made to the instructor of the course. The extension, if approved, is for a period of up to another six months as designated by the instructor.

Graduate

Work reported as I (Incomplete) in the fall session for graduate students must be completed by June 1st the next calendar year. Work reported Incomplete in the spring and summer sessions must be completed by January 1st the next calendar year. The exact length of time to remove the Incomplete within the above timelines, is set by agreement between the instructor and the student. If the work reported as Incomplete is not made up by the deadline noted above, it is automatically entered as an F (Failure) on the student's record.

Any requests for an exception to the above timelines for graduate students must be submitted on-line through MyUNIverse (refer to Filing Graduate Student Requests). Only under the most unusual circumstances would requests for additional time be approved.

Some courses continue beyond the normal ending date of the semester or session. In such cases, the initial grade reported will be an RC which means Research or Course Continued. Once the extended instructional period is finished, the RC grade will be replaced with the A-F grade assigned by the instructor.

Regression

Regression occurs when a student enrolls in a course which has content fundamental to another course the student has previously completed successfully. When such regression occurs, the regressive course will be available on an ungraded (credit/no credit) basis only. Credit may be earned but the hours earned will increase the student's minimum degree hour requirement by an equal amount.

The decision as to whether a course is regressive is made by the department offering the courses. Regression does not occur when the more advanced course was failed. (Courses to which this policy applies will be identified in the Schedule of Classes.)

Duplication

When two courses have content which is highly similar, e.g., one for the liberal arts core and one for major/minor requirements, the department offering the course(s) will determine if degree credit can be earned in both courses. If the department will not allow degree credit in both courses, the credit in the course taken second will increase the student's minimum degree hour requirement by an equal amount. Such second courses may be completed only on an ungraded (credit/no credit) basis.

Marks and Grade Points

The marks A, B, C, D, F (Failed), and I (Incomplete) are used in indicating quality of work. Courses dropped during the first one-eighth of the semester or summer session are not recorded on the student's record. Courses dropped during the second- through fourth-eighth of the term are indicated on the student's record by W (Withdrawn). For courses dropped during the final one-half of the term (the specific date of the last day to drop a course without an F is listed in the Schedule of Classes for each semester), F (Failure) shall be reported unless for unusual circumstances specific permission is given to report otherwise.

The time for dropping classes in the summer session is proportionately shorter than in the regular semester. Date deadlines for dropping or adding courses are given in the Schedule of Classes for each semester and the summer session.

Grade points are awarded as follows.

For each hour of credit marked:

  • A, 4.00 grade points
  • A-, 3.67 grade points
  • B+, 3.33 grade points
  • B, 3.00 grade points
  • B-, 2.67 grade points
  • C+, 2.33 grade points
  • C, 2.00 grade points
  • C-, l.67 grade points
  • D+, l.33 grade points
  • D, l.00 grade point
  • D-, 0.67 grade points
  • F, 0.00 grade points

Grade Index

In determining a student's cumulative grade index, all course work attempted at this university shall be used as the basis of computation with the following exceptions for students enrolled as undergraduates. If a student repeats successfully a course s(he) has previously failed, only the grade received for the successful completion will be included in figuring the cumulative grade point. If a student repeats a course s(he) has successfully completed, the grade received the last time the student takes the course will be used in figuring the grade index even though the last grade may be lower than the grade received previously. The student's transcript of record will show every time the course is taken and the grade earned. Post-baccalaureate students as undergraduates enrolled for work to meet requirements for certification as elementary or secondary teachers are given the same grade index advantage as is given undergraduate students for courses repeated. This applies only to those courses required for certification. If a graduate student repeats a course, both grades count in computing the index.

Failed Courses

A course taken in an on-campus setting, which was failed, may be repeated but must also be taken in a like on-campus setting. A UNI course which was failed may be repeated at another accredited college or university as long as the course has been determined and approved to be an equivalent to the original course. A course that has been failed may not be repeated by correspondence (specified as Guided Independent Study at UNI), nor may credit be established by examination for a course which has been taken previously and failed. A correspondence/UNI Guided Independent Study course which has been completed and failed may be repeated through correspondence/UNI Guided Independent Study.

Undergraduate Academic Standing Policy

Undergraduate students at the University of Northern Iowa are expected to meet academic standards set by the university and to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress towards earning a degree. Academic Alert and Academic Probation serve to warn students that unless their academic performance improves, s/he may be placed on Academic Suspension. No student in his/her first-semester in attendance at the University of Northern Iowa will be placed on Academic Suspension.

First-semester students (freshmen and transfer students) at the University of Northern Iowa placed on Academic Alert or Academic Probation may be subject to conditions designed to increase academic success. A student who does not agree to these conditions may have her/his course schedule canceled for the semester.

All continuing students (students who are in their second semester or beyond at UNI) who are placed on Academic Probation should also seek assistance for academic improvement from academic advisors, the Academic Learning Center, or the Counseling Center.

Academic Alert

Any first-semester student who has a 1.00 – 1.99 UNI semester GPA will be placed on Academic Alert. Only first-semester students new to the university can be placed on Academic Alert. While on Academic Alert, the student will be limited to 14 credit hours. Academic Alert is not recorded on the student’s official academic transcript.

At the end of a student’s semester on Academic Alert, one of the following actions will be taken:

  • The student will be placed on Academic Probation if his/her UNI cumulative GPA is less than a 2.0
  • The student will be removed from Academic Alert and shall be in Good academic standing if his/her UNI cumulative GPA is a 2.0 or higher.

Academic Probation

Any first-semester student who has a UNI semester GPA below 1.0 will be placed on Academic Probation. Also, any continuing student will be placed on Academic Probation when their UNI cumulative GPA is below a 2.0. A student placed on Academic Probation must earn a minimum UNI semester GPA of 2.0 for each semester while on Academic Probation until his/her UNI cumulative GPA reaches 2.0 or higher.

While on Academic Probation, a student will be limited to 14 credit hours. Once a student’s UNI cumulative GPA reaches 2.0 or higher, s/he will be removed from Academic Probation. Academic Probation is not recorded on the student’s official academic transcript.

At the end of a student’s semester on Academic Probation, one of the following actions will be taken:

  • The student will be placed on Academic Suspension if his/her UNI semester GPA is less than a 2.0.
  • The student will continue on Academic Probation if his/her UNI semester GPA is a 2.0 or higher and his/her UNI cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0.
  • The student will be removed from Academic Probation and shall be in Good academic standing if his/her UNI cumulative GPA is a 2.0 or higher.

Academic Suspension

A student on Academic Probation who fails to earn a UNI semester GPA of 2.0 will be placed on Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension is for a minimum period of one calendar year and is permanently noted on the student’s official academic transcript. Once suspended, a student will not be allowed to re-enroll at the University of Northern Iowa until he/she has been academically reinstated.

Readmission after Suspension

Academic Suspension is for a minimum period of one calendar year. Only the most extenuating circumstances would warrant consideration for readmission before the minimum of one academic year has elapsed.

An undergraduate student who has been placed on Academic Suspension may be readmitted only after completing the Application for Readmission from Academic Suspension and receiving formal reinstatement from the Committee on Admission, Readmission, and Retention. The Application for Readmission from Academic Suspension can be completed and submitted online at www.uni.edu/registrar. As a condition of reinstatement, a student may be subject to stipulations designed to increase academic success. A student who does not agree to these conditions may be denied readmissions or have her/his course schedule canceled for the semester. 

A student who is readmitted after suspension will be placed on Academic Probation following Suspension beginning with the semester immediately following his/her return to UNI. A student readmitted after suspension must earn a minimum UNI semester GPA of 2.0 for each semester after being readmitted until his/her UNI cumulative GPA reaches 2.0 or higher. While on Academic Probation following Suspension, the student will be limited to 14 credit hours for a semester.

Academic Suspension for a second time is considered permanent. Only the most extenuating circumstances would warrant consideration for readmission from Academic Suspension a second time.

At the end of a student’s semester on Academic Probation following Suspension, one of the following actions will be taken:

  • The student will be permanently academically suspended if his/her UNI semester GPA is less than a 2.0.
  • The student will continue on Academic Probation following Suspension if his/her UNI semester GPA is a 2.0 or higher and his/her UNI cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0.
  • The student will be removed from Academic Probation following Suspension and shall be in Good academic standing if his/her UNI cumulative GPA is a 2.0 or higher.

Graduate Probation and Suspension

Refer to Graduate Degree Requirements in this University Catalog.

Dean's List

To be eligible for the Dean's Honor List, which is published each fall and spring semester, a student must have earned a grade point average of no less than 3.50 while completing at least 12 semester hours in graded work or in field experience in that semester. A Dean's Honor List is not compiled for the summer session, nor does the list include graduate students.

Graduation with Honors

Three levels of honors are awarded to students on graduation from a bachelor's degree curriculum. To receive an honor rating, the student must earn not less than 55 semester hours of credit at this university (effective Spring 2008). Only credit earned in residence at this university is considered in making honor awards, except for students graduating with the Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree in which case both residence and non-residence credit taken at this university is considered.

The names of the students receiving honors are identified in the commencement program and on their academic transcript.

Summa Cum Laude

Students whose cumulative UNI grade point average places them in the top 3% of those students graduating from their academic major college/division will be awarded Summa Cum Laude.

Magna Cum Laude

Students whose cumulative UNI grade point average places them in the top 4% through top 8% of those students graduating from their academic major college/division will be awarded Magna Cum Laude.

Cum Laude

Students whose cumulative UNI grade point average places them in the top 9% through top 15% of those students graduating from their academic major college/division will be awarded Cum Laude.

University Honors Program

www.uni.edu/honors

The University of Northern Iowa Honors Program is designed to meet the needs of motivated, high-achieving students. Challenging classroom experiences, interaction with faculty, and social connections with other capable students are just a few of the benefits of Honors involvement.

Qualifying first-year students will will automatically be invited to join the University Honors Program upon their admission to the University of Northern Iowa. Entrance requirements include:

  • ACT composite of 27 or above (SAT-CR&M of 1210 or above) and top 10% high school class rank, or
  • RAI of 330 or above

Students who do not meet the criteria for an automatic invitation can request that their case be reviewed on an individual basis. Current UNI or transfer students may apply for admission to the program with a GPA of 3.30 or better and a professor’s recommendation. See http://www.uni.edu/honors/content/entrance-requirements for more information.

To remain in the program, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point of 3.30. Students who do not meet the minimum cumulative grade point requirement of 3.30 are placed on probation. The non-cumulative grade point average of the following semester should be above 3.30 to provide evidence of overall improvement. Such evidence of improvement, and continued improvement resulting in a cumulative grade point above 3.30, will remove the student from probationary status. If a student is on probation and no improvement is shown, the student will be dismissed from the program. If a student wishes to re-enter the program at a later date, reapplication is necessary.

The University Honors Program offers two designations for participation: University Honors with Distinction and University Honors. To graduate from the Honors Program with University Honors with Distinction, a student must produce an honors thesis or project and take a total of 30 hours of honors credit. To graduate from the Honors Program with University Honors, a student must produce an honors thesis or project and take a total of 18 hours of honors credit. See www.uni.edu/honors/content/program-requirements for a complete description of program requirements and a standard distribution of hours.

For more information, contact:

The University Honors Program
2401 College Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0355
319-273-3175

Credit/No Credit Grading

An undergraduate student having earned twelve semester hours of credit at this university may take courses offered by this institution for which s(he) is otherwise eligible for degree credit without grade under the following conditions:

  1. The course work requirements for a student taking work on an ungraded basis shall be the same as for a student taking the work on a graded basis.
  2. A grade of C- or higher is required in a course to receive credit on the credit/no credit option.
  3. Not more than 22 hours of ungraded course work in addition to courses authorized to be offered only for ungraded credit may be taken toward any bachelor's degree.
  4. Ungraded credit may not be applied to work required for a major or minor except with the consent of the head of the department in which the course is offered.
  5. No course taken in the credit/no credit option may be applied toward meeting a Liberal Arts Core requirement.
  6. Except for Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching (TEACHING 2017), Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent (TEACHING 3128), and for Student Teaching (TEACHING 3132 (280:132) through TEACHING 3140 (280:140) ), ungraded credit may not be used to meet the Professional Education Requirements for the teaching program.
  7. Course work passed without grade (CR=credit) may not be retaken except by special permission of the dean of the college in which the course is offered.
  8. A graded course completed may not be retaken on an ungraded basis.
  9. The credit/no credit system may not be used with Credit by Examination, Extension, or Correspondence (specified as Guided Independent Study at UNI) courses.
  10. Change of registration in a course to or from a non-graded basis may not be made after five class days beyond midterm in a full, academic-year semester, or after the mid-point in the duration of a course taught in a period less than a full, academic-year semester. Only one such change of registration may be made per course.
    A graduate student may include up to three credit hours of non-graded graduate course work in the program of study with the approval of the department.
  11. The credit/no credit grading system may not be used in Presidential Scholars Seminars or for the Presidential Scholars Thesis/Project credit.

Note: No upper level (100/3000-level and above) accounting courses may be taken on a credit/no credit or audited basis without written consent of the department head or director of the MAcc, except ACCT 3090 (120:169), ACCT 3092/5092 (120:170g), ACCT 3179 (120:179), and ACCT 6090 (120:269).

Open Credit System

This type of undergraduate credit is designed for special projects such as a paper, experiment, work of art, or portfolio assessment of prior learning. The experience upon which the project is based may have been completed at any previous time; however, the student must be registered for credit at this university during the semester open credit is requested and open credit will be recorded only after the student has satisfactorily completed 12 hours of credit at this institution.

A project may be submitted any time during the semester up to the last date to add a second half-semester course for credit. There is no guarantee of credit prior to or upon submittal of the project. The project is submitted to an ad hoc faculty committee of three faculty members recommended by the student and approved by the head of the academic department or discipline in which the project falls; two faculty members are chosen from the academic area or discipline of the project and one from any area. The student may not submit a project evaluated by one committee to a second committee for reevaluation. The student may resubmit a project to the original committee at the committee's discretion or with its encouragement.

The number of open credit hours assigned to a project will reflect the academic evaluation of the project; credit will be awarded for work judged to be of at least C-level quality. No letter grades are given. The range of credit is from 0-6 hours per project. A student may apply a maximum of 18 hours of open credit toward graduation requirements. Open credit is normally elective but, upon the recommendation of the ad hoc committee, it may be approved for requirements in the Liberal Arts Core with the approval of the Office of Academic Affairs or for major credit with departmental approval.

Students should contact the Special Programs Office or the appropriate departmental office for advice in submitting projects. Application forms may be secured from the Office of the Registrar.

Internships/Cooperative Education

Internships and cooperative education experiences (co-op) help students integrate academic study with work experience. Students may intern with business, industry, or governmental/non-profit organizations in locations ranging from local to international. Registration of internships is optional, with the exception of a few majors, which require an internship for graduation.

Students who participate in an internship may be eligible for academic credit or a transcript notation. Academic departments establish the requirements for academic credit and Career Services establishes the requirements for a transcript notation. Factors such as GPA, prerequisite courses, year in school, and the intern’s responsibilities determine student eligibility.

Career Services encourages students to meet with staff as early as their freshmen year to begin talking about internship opportunities. More information about internships can be found on the Career Services website: www.uni.edu/careerservices.

Credit by Examination

Credit in a course may be earned by examination by undergraduates. Credit is earned only if a grade of A or B is received in the examination. A grade of C will release a student from a course requirement, but gives no credit. A grade below C gives neither credit nor release and is not recorded on the student's record. Credit earned by examination is recorded on the student's record only as Passed or Released. The results are not counted in a student's grade index.

Credit may not be established by examination for a course which has been taken previously and failed, or for a course for which the student does not meet the prerequisite, or for a course which is a prerequisite to one for which credit has already been earned.

Application for credit by examination is made to the Office of the Registrar, and approved by the head of the department offering the course and the dean of the college in which the course is offered.

The department is responsible for giving the examinations and establishing the requirements for fulfilling the examinations. Credit by examination is open to most courses offered on campus; however, a student should discuss the course requirements with the department head before making application for credit by examination.

Note: For limitations in the total amount of credit earned by examination, refer to Graduate Degree Requirements in this University Catalog.

Independent Study

Undergraduate students of outstanding ability and achievement may be permitted to earn credit by departmental independent study.

This method of study follows the pattern of an investigation undertaken by a graduate student, although in reduced form. It involves independent thinking, the drawing of conclusions, the summarizing of evidence, or creative work. Whenever possible, the result of the investigation is summarized in a scholarly paper or report, prepared and documented in an approved fashion. This report is filed in the department office.

Independent study should not involve work available through regular university courses; neither should it be confused with individual instruction, or the tutorial method. Individual instruction is provided on rare occasions for instruction in a university course not currently being offered.

Application for independent study, including an outline of the proposed project, should be made to the head of the department in which the study is to be done and must have this approval before the project is undertaken. The student's program of independent study will be under the immediate supervision of one or more faculty members. Except for the major in Individual Studies, not more than six hours of credit earned by independent study may be used to meet the requirements of a major.

Independent study may also be taken under the Individual Studies program. Refer to Individual Studies major in this University Catalog for details.

Auditing Classes

A student may register for classes on an audit (non-credit) basis at the University of Northern Iowa if a space is available in the class. If the addition of the course to be audited (visited) makes the student's total course load hours more than is permitted according to the student's grade point average, the student must also have written approval from the Office of the Registrar for an overload of course work.

There is no reduction of fees for auditing (visiting) a course.

Specific information on auditing (visiting) classes may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Visitors in the courses are not required to take examinations, take part in class discussions, or complete other work. Audits will not be recorded on the permanent record except by a student request approved by the instructor showing that the student regularly attended the course.

Writing in the Liberal Arts Core and the Disciplines

At UNI, students are expected to write in the Liberal Arts Core (LAC) and in each undergraduate major. Writing experience in both the LAC and the undergraduate majors fosters learning, develops thinking, and introduces students to understanding writing as a process integral to critical inquiry in academic, professional, and personal contexts.  Students may satisfy Northern Iowa's LAC writing requirement by academic credit earned in one of the following ways (or an equivalent):

ENGLISH 1005 (620:005)College Writing and Research3
ENGLISH 2015 (620:015)Craft of Academic Writing3
ENGLISH 2120 (620:034)Critical Writing About Literature3
UNIV 1000
  & UNIV 1010
First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I
   and First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II *
6
*(a two-semester sequence that satisfies both LAC 1A, Writing and Reading, and LAC 1B, Speaking and Listening)

Comparable writing instruction and practice may be available for qualified students in writing-enhanced sections of other Liberal Arts Core courses.

UNI is committed to helping students become competent writers for different purposes in various settings. Each department sets the writing requirements for its majors; because writing needs vary across disciplines, the requirements and conventions for writing differ across departments.

For students who do not meet the English admissions requirement, and for other students with limited writing experience, ENGLISH 1002 (620:002) College Writing Basics provides instruction and practice designed to prepare students for success in courses that satisfy the LAC Writing requirement.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The University of Northern Iowa (UNI) is a participating university in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP).  Developed by the College Board, CLEP examinations measure knowledge of the material usually covered in courses taken in the first two years of college. CLEP exam-takers include home-schooled students, high school graduates, adults just entering or returning to school, military service members, and traditional college students. CLEP examinations are administered in over 1,800 testing centers in the United States and abroad. Students may test at the testing center of their choice and request to have their scores sent to their college/university.  CLEP is the most widely accepted credit-by-examination program, with over 2,900 colleges and universities accepting CLEP credit.

At UNI, the CLEP exam is regularly administered in Examination Services. Students should take CLEP exams prior to enrollment at UNI or early in their college career to avoid taking a course that will duplicate or disqualify them from receiving CLEP credit. Before completing the online registration to take the CLEP examination, it is highly recommended that students meet with an academic advisor knowledgeable about the CLEP program.  Since all CLEP exams require college-level knowledge and critical thinking, to do well, students are strongly encouraged to prepare for their CLEP examination.

Not all CLEP exams are accepted for credit at UNI.  A list of courses for which CLEP examinations may be taken along with the minimum scores to earn credit is available from Examination Services or the UNI Office of Admissions. 

At UNI, each CLEP examination may be attempted only once for credit.  Credit earned from a CLEP exam approved by UNI is applied to degree requirements.  A maximum of 32 semester hours of credit by examination may apply toward degree requirements.  This includes credit earned by CLEP, Advanced Placement, UNI departmental examination, and examinations from other colleges and universities. 

The Iowa Regents’ Universities/Community College Credit by Examination Agreement sets the standards for awarding and transferring credit by examination between institutions.  Students who have established CLEP credit at a college or university prior to enrollment at UNI may submit official reports of their scores for consideration when applying to UNI.

A student may not earn credit by examination in an area in which the student previously has attempted or completed an equivalent course, a course of similar level, or one that is more advanced in content level.  A course in which a student was enrolled until a W (withdrawal) was submitted in place of a grade is considered to be an attempted course. 

Students who are interested in earning CLEP credit but need more information are welcome to contact:

UNI Examination Services
007 Innovative Teaching and Technology Center
319-273-6023 or email unialc@uni.edu

Advanced Placement Program

The University of Northern Iowa participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. Through enrollment in special courses in a participating high school, a qualified high school senior may take Advanced Placement examinations in one or more academic subjects at the college level. UNI grants college credits in art, biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, English, environmental science, history, human geography, languages (Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Spanish), mathematics, music, physics, political science, psychology, and statistics to students who pass examinations with scores of 3, 4, or 5 (minimum score of 4 for chemistry). (For limitations in the total amount of credit earned by examination, refer to additional information provided within this University Catalog.)

For additional information about the transfer of Advanced Placement credit to UNI, contact the UNI Office of Admissions.

Post-Baccalaureate, Undergraduate Study

A student who has received a bachelor's degree may choose to apply for further study at the University of Northern Iowa as an undergraduate rather than a graduate student. Inquiries should be made to the Office of Admissions. Undergraduate status will be accorded students who seek:

  1. a second baccalaureate degree (designation as senior) or
  2. teacher licensure (designation as senior) - a student who does not hold a teaching certificate and expects to be recommended by this university for an original certificate must also file an official transcript, or
  3. courses for undergraduate credit (designation as unclassified)

Students with baccalaureate degrees do not earn graduate credit while in Post-baccalaureate Undergraduate status only. They must be admitted either to graduate Degree or Non-Degree Status before they can enroll in graduate courses (courses numbered 5000 or above).  A student who is working toward a second bachelor's degree or teacher licensure and is also admitted as a graduate student will pay graduate tuition for the entire enrollment if any of the enrollment is for graduate credit.  No course can apply to both a bachelor's degree and a graduate degree.  See "Students enrolled for both graduate and undergraduate credit in the same term" in this university catalog for further information. 

Retroactive granting of graduate credit for course work taken while in post-baccalaureate, undergraduate status will not be done if, when the course work was taken, the student received financial aid dependent on undergraduate status.  If an undergraduate course can be taken at the 5000-level for graduate credit, extra work is required from graduate students to earn the graduate credit.  This extra work cannot be completed after the course ends to change the course to graduate credit.

Students Enrolled for Both Graduate and Undergraduate Credit in the Same Term (Dual Career Students)

A student may take both graduate and undergraduate credit courses in the same term in one of the circumstances below.  A student must be degree-seeking in, and enrolled at least half-time in, her/his primary career in order to be eligible for federal financial aid.  See the appropriate circumstance below for an explanation of which career is primary and for tuition billing information.

Graduate Credit as a Senior

An undergraduate student of senior standing (90 or more credits earned) at the time of registration, earning the first bachelor’s degree, and with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00, may register for a maximum of 12 total credit hours for graduate credit. Such registration requires approval on a student request form (available at access.uni.edu/forms/#S or through department offices) by the student’s advisor, the instructor of the course(s), and the head(s) of the department(s) offering the course(s). Additional approval by the Graduate College on the student request form is required if the student’s GPA is below 3.00, or if the registration is occurring during advanced registration the semester before the student attains senior standing.The combined total of course credits, both undergraduate and graduate, may not exceed 15 hours in a semester or 8 hours in a summer session. Overload requests must be approved by the student’s advisor and the Graduate College.

No course may count toward both an undergraduate and a graduate degree. Graduate credit earned as an undergraduate will not be counted toward the undergraduate degree and may or may not be counted toward UNI graduate degree programs at the discretion of the graduate program. Some graduate programs have early admission procedures which the student must follow in order for the graduate credit to apply to the graduate degree. The earliest graduate course that applies to a student’s graduate program marks the beginning of the recency period for the completion of the degree.

Students earning graduate credit as a senior are classified as seniors but will pay graduate tuition for the semester hours for which they will receive graduate credit. The maximum tuition will be the full-time graduate rate for the student's residence classification.  The undergraduate career is the student’s primary career for financial aid purposes.  The student must be enrolled at least half-time in undergraduate courses to be eligible for federal financial aid, which will be at the undergraduate level.

Graduate Student Taking an Undergraduate Course

Graduate students wishing to take an undergraduate course for any reason (personal interest, to satisfy provisions of admission, professional development or certification, etc.) must submit an online graduate student request through MyUNIverse.  Request type Q should be used.  Once the request is approved, and assuming the requested course is open, the Registrar’s Office will enroll the student in the course.  Undergraduate courses taken by graduate students in Fall 2011 and later will appear only on an undergraduate transcript and will not be included in the graduate GPA.

Graduate students taking undergraduate courses will pay graduate tuition for their entire enrollment if they are taking any courses for graduate credit in that term.  The maximum tuition will be the full-time graduate rate for the student's residence classification.  If the only enrollment is undergraduate courses, undergraduate tuition will be charged.  However, the graduate career is the student’s primary career for financial aid, regardless of enrollment.  The student must be enrolled at least half-time in graduate courses to be eligible to receive federal financial aid, which will be at the graduate level.

Graduate Student Concurrent with Second Bachelor's Degree or Teacher Licensure

A student who has received a bachelor’s degree may be simultaneously active in both an undergraduate career, to work toward a second bachelor’s degree or teacher licensure, and a graduate career, either degree-seeking or non-degree.  The student who wishes to do this must submit two applications for admission—one for post-baccalaureate undergraduate admission (see Post-baccalaureate, Undergraduate Study in this university catalog) and one for admission to graduate study (see Admission to Graduate Study in this university catalog).  No course can apply to both a bachelor’s degree and a graduate degree.  Students who are admitted in this way will have both an undergraduate and a graduate transcript.

A graduate student (degree or non-degree) who is concurrently working toward a second bachelor’s degree or teacher licensure will pay graduate tuition for the entire registration of a term if any courses are taken for graduate credit in that term. The maximum tuition will be the full-time graduate rate for the student's residence classification.

If the student is graduate degree-seeking, the graduate career is the student’s primary career for financial aid and the student must be enrolled at least half-time in graduate courses to be eligible for federal financial aid, which will be at the graduate level. However, if the only enrollment is in undergraduate courses, undergraduate tuition will be charged, and the Office of Financial Aid will regard the undergraduate career as primary for that term if the graduate career is temporarily discontinued.  In that case, the student must be enrolled at least half-time in undergraduate courses to be eligible for federal financial aid, which will be at the undergraduate level.  A student cannot apply for graduation with the graduate degree when the graduate career is discontinued.

If the student is graduate non-degree, the undergraduate career is the primary career for financial aid.  The student must be enrolled at least half-time in undergraduate courses to be eligible for federal financial aid, which will be at the undergraduate level.

Non-degree Graduate Student and Non-Degree Undergraduate Student

A student who has received a bachelor’s degree may be simultaneously active in both a non-degree undergraduate career, to take undergraduate courses for personal interest, and a non-degree graduate career, to take graduate courses for personal interest or to demonstrate competence in graduate work prior to applying to a graduate program.  The student who wishes to do this must submit two applications for admission—one for post-baccalaureate undergraduate non-degree admission (see Post-baccalaureate, Undergraduate Study in this university catalog) and one for admission to non-degree graduate study (see Admission to Graduate Study in this university catalog).  Students who are admitted in this way will have both an undergraduate and a graduate transcript.

A non-degree graduate student who is also a non-degree undergraduate student will pay graduate tuition for the entire registration of a term if any courses are taken for graduate credit in that term. The maximum tuition will be the full-time graduate rate for the student's residence classification.  If the only enrollment is undergraduate courses, undergraduate tuition will be charged.  Students who are not degree-seeking are not eligible for federal financial aid.

Workshops and Study Tours

From time to time, and especially during the summer session, opportunities are offered for earning credit under the workshop plan. Workshops provide residence credit, but a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward graduation.

Occasionally, departments of the university may arrange extensive study tours here and abroad for credit. These trips are open to graduate and undergraduate students. Plans for this type of study and the number of hours of credit which may be earned are announced through university publications.

Student Requests for Exceptions to Academic Policy

Undergraduate students who wish to request that an individual exception be made to a stated academic policy should complete a Student Request in consultation with their advisors. Undergraduate Student Request forms are available online at http://access.uni.edu/forms/index.shtml (Student Requests - Undergraduate), in all departmental offices, and from the Office of the Registrar. The advisor's signature is required for all requests. Other approvals may include the instructor, department head, dean, University Registrar, and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, depending on the nature of the request.

Graduate students submit graduate student requests online. See Filing Graduate Student Requests. 

Student Academic Ethics Policy (3.01) 

Purpose

The culture of The University of Northern Iowa is characterized by a long-standing commitment to student learning and to excellence in teaching. This commitment has been established through the development of an open, ethical and caring community that promotes diversity, honesty, integrity, respect, fairness, trust and civility among its members. This community has created a culture based on core values that include intellectual vitality, intellectual and academic freedom, the well-being of its members and service to others.

In order to realize its commitments and values, all members of the UNI community must demonstrate academic integrity and ethical behavior and foster academic integrity and ethical behavior in others. Those who violate UNI’s standards of academic ethics must be held responsible for their misconduct.  Those who observe violations of academic ethics have a responsibility to address it.

It is the purpose of this document to describe the responsibilities, provide definitions and examples of conduct which violates academic ethics and recommend appropriate sanctions in the case of misconduct.

Policy
  1. Responsibilities of Academic Administrators

    It is the responsibility of the Administration to foster and maintain the culture of the institution, including that of academic ethics and integrity.  Ways of supporting this aspect of the University mission and culture may include:

    1. Collaborating with faculty in creation of procedures, policies, and tools for the education and enforcement of academic ethics and integrity.
    2. Assisting and supporting faculty in the investigation and appropriate correction of violations of academic ethics and integrity
    3. Discussing the importance of academic honesty and ethics with students.
    4. Addressing violations of the academic ethics policy by a student.
    5. Communicating with faculty and students actions taken to address violations of academic ethics.
  2. Responsibilities of Faculty Members

    Faculty members have responsibilities to model academic integrity and ethics for their students, to educate students about these qualities and behaviors and to promote compliance with the standards described in this policy.  They may do so by:

    1. Describing in writing and distributing the objectives and requirements of the course they are teaching at the beginning of each semester and summer term;
    2. Including a reference to the Academic Ethics policy on each course syllabus every semester;
    3. Discussing the importance of academic honesty and ethics with students;
    4. Making clear on their syllabus their expectations regarding individual or collaborative work, the use of supplemental aids for examinations and assignments and other specific guidelines they want  students to follow in completing assigned course work;
    5. Being available to answer students’ questions about issues of academic honesty and proper procedures for course work;
    6. Addressing violations of the academic ethics policy by a student.
  3. Responsibilities of Students

    Students have responsibilities to become educated about the standards of ethics and behavior in the academic community and to adhere to those standards in all of their academic work. Students fulfill their responsibilities by:

    1. Reading and becoming familiar with the Academic Ethics policy;
    2. Understanding and avoiding actions that violate the Academic Ethics policy ;
    3. Undertaking a commitment to act with honesty and integrity in completing any and all academic work;
    4.  Understanding and applying the proper methods of attribution and citation in all written, oral and electronic submissions;
    5. Making sure they understand the requirements and expectations for academic work of each of their professors and to seek clarification from the faculty member when they are unsure if their behavior will violate those expectations;
    6. Maintaining University standards by reporting acts of academic misconduct to the faculty member for the course or another academic administrator such as a department head or dean.
  4. Academic Ethics Violations
    1. Plagiarism
      1. Copying information word for word from a source, including cutting and pasting information from an electronic text, without using quotation marks and giving proper acknowledgment of the source or providing a proper citation.
      2. Paraphrasing, or putting into one’s own words, the text of a source without providing proper acknowledgment of the source or providing a proper citation.  The paraphrasing leads the reader of the text to believe that the ideas and arguments presented are one’s own.
      3. Paraphrasing extensive portions of another source, even with citation.  The extensive paraphrasing leads the reader of one’s own text to believe that the ideas and arguments presented are one’s own or it results in one’s own contribution to the work being minimal.
      4. Presenting any work or part of a work or assignment that has been prepared by someone else as one’s own.  This would include using unauthorized assistance in preparing the work or acquiring written work from another person, purchasing a paper or assignment from a commercial organization, using the work of another person or obtaining the answers or work from any other source.
      5. Reproducing, without proper citation, any other form of work of another person such as a graph, experimental data or results, laboratory reports, a proof, or a problem solution, in full or in part. 
    2. Misrepresentation Misrepresentation is a false statement of fact.  Examples in the academic arena include but are not limited to:
      1.  Arranging for another student to complete course work for one including taking an exam on one’s behalf.
      2. Taking credit for work one didn’t complete, such as taking credit for a team assignment without participating or contributing as expected by one’s instructor or team mates.
      3. Turning in the same or substantially similar written work to satisfy the requirements for more than one project or course, without the express, prior written consent of the instructor or instructors. If the work is from a prior term’s course one would need the express written consent of the current instructor.  If you want to submit the work in more than one course during the same term one needs the express written consent of all instructors who will receive the work.
    3. Fabrication Fabrication means falsifying or misusing data in any academic exercise. Examples include but are not limited to:
      1. Falsifying data collected during a research activity.
      2.  Presenting falsified data in a paper, manuscript, or presentation.
      3. Making up a source for a citation.
      4. Citing a source the writer did not use.
      5. Altering and resubmitting assignments, tests, quizzes or exams to gain additional credit.
    4. Cheating  Cheating is the use or attempted use of any unauthorized assistance in any academic exercise.  Examples include but are not limited to:
      1. Copying from someone else’s assignment, paper, quiz or exam.
      2. Looking on someone else’s exam before or during an examination.
      3. Unauthorized use of notes or other aids during a quiz, exam or other  performance evaluation.
      4. During a quiz or exam, using an electronic device that contains unauthorized information.
      5. Communicating or attempting to communicate answers, hints or suggestions during an exam using any means including electronic devices.
      6. Collaborating, without prior permission from one’s professor, in the preparation of assignments, lab reports, papers or take home exams.
      7. Using another person’s answers for an assignment.
      8. Providing test questions to other students either orally or in written form.
      9. Stealing or attempting to steal an exam, exam questions or an answer key.
    5. Impeding fair and equal access to the educational and research process. Examples of this include but are not limited to:
      1. Tampering with, damaging, hiding or otherwise impeding other students’ access to library materials or other related academic resources.
      2. Attempting to prevent access by others to the computer system or destroying files or materials in the e-learning system for the course.
    6. Misrepresenting or misusing one’s relationship with the University. Examples of this include but are not limited to:
      1. Falsifying, misusing, or tampering with information such as test scores, transcripts, letters of recommendation or other materials required for admission to and continued enrollment and access in the University’s programs or facilities.
      2. Altering, forging or misusing academic records or any official University form regarding self or others.
      3. Presenting false information at an academic proceeding or intentionally destroying evidence important to an academic proceeding.
      4. Making a bad faith report of an academic integrity violation.
      5. Offering bribes to any University representative in exchange for special favors or consideration in an academic proceeding.
    7. Facilitation Facilitation occurs when you knowingly or intentionally assist another in committing a violation of any of the previous sections of this academic ethics policy.
  5. Academic Ethics Sanctions

    A record of all documented violations will be maintained in the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost.  Notice of all documented violations will also be sent to the Dean of Students.  Any reported violation that involves a research activity, as defined in the research misconduct policy, will be reported to the Research Misconduct Officer and the investigation and sanction of research misconduct will be coordinated.

    Students accused of a violation of academic ethics may appeal the decision using the Academic Grievance process described in 12.01 Academic Grievance Policy

    1. Level One Violations

      Level One violations occur because of inexperience or lack of knowledge of principles of academic ethics on the part of the person committing the violation.  These violations only involve a small fraction of the total course work, are not extensive, occur on a minor assignment and would not have appreciably increased the student’s grade in the course.

      Examples include but are not limited to:

      • Working with another student on a homework assignment or a lab report when the instructor has not explicitly authorized collaborative work.
      • Failure to properly cite once in a paper.
      • Possible sanctions are, but are not limited to:
      • Giving no credit for the assignment; course grade determined in the usual manner.
      • Requiring a makeup assignment that is more difficult than the original assignment.
      • Completing an assignment involving practice of proper citation.
      • Reprimanding the student in writing in the form of a letter addressed to the student and copied to the faculty department head, the student’s department head (if different) and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost. The letter should document the academic ethics violation and action taken.  The letter must also advise the student of his/her right to file a grievance and provide the web address of the grievance policy.

      Level One reprimands will be placed in the student’s file maintained in the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost but will not be made public or attached to transcripts or other records. The Provost will notify the student in writing that such action has been taken.

    2. Level Two Violations Level Two violations involve dishonesty and/or affect a significant portion of the course work.

      Examples include but are not limited to:

      • Direct quotation or paraphrasing, more than once in an assignment without acknowledging the source.
      • Copying on an examination.
      • Giving unauthorized assistance to someone during an exam.
      • Submitting the same work or major portions of a work to satisfy the requirements of more than one course without permission from the instructor.
      • Using the work of collaborators on an assignment or laboratory report without acknowledging their contributions.

      Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to:

      • No credit for the assignment; course grade determined in the usual manner.
      • No credit for the assignment; reduction in course grade.
      • Completing an assignment on academic ethics.

      Reprimanding the student in writing in the form of a letter addressed to the student and copied to the faculty department head, the student’s department head (if different) and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost. The letter should document the academic ethics violation and action taken.  The letter must also advise the student of his/her right to file a grievance and provide the web address of the grievance policy. The Executive Vice President and Provost or designee will notify the student in writing that such action has been taken.

    3. Level Three Violations

      Level Three violations include dishonesty that affects a major or essential portion of work done to meet course requirements or assisting others to dishonestly complete such work.  A third Level One violation or second Level Two violation will also be considered as a Level Three violation.

      Examples include but are not limited to:

      • Using prohibited materials during an exam.
      • Altering an exam or assignment and submitting it for re-grading.
      • Acquiring or distributing exam questions from an unauthorized source.
      • Acquiring or distributing an exam answer key from an unauthorized source.
      • Plagiarism that exceeds the Level Two violation threshold.
      • Presenting the work of another person as one’s own.
      • Interfering with other students’ access to course materials in the library or electronically posted.
      • Fabricating research data.

      Required sanctions:

      • Disciplinary failure for the course.  (This will appear on the student’s transcript.)
      • Reprimanding the student in writing in the form of a letter addressed to the student and copied to the faculty department head, the student’s department head (if different) and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost. The letter should document the academic ethics violation and action taken.  The letter must also advise the student of his/her right to file a grievance and provide the web address of the grievance policy. The Executive Vice President and Provost or designee will notify the student in writing that such action has been taken.

      Possible further sanction, determined by the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost, based on the student’s prior record of academic ethics violations, includes disciplinary probation.

    4. Level Four Violations

      Level Four violations are the most serious breaches of intellectual ethics.

      Examples include but are not limited to:

      • Breaches of academic ethics which involve forgery, theft or falsification of University documents or credentials.
      • Taking an exam for someone else or having someone else take an exam for you.
      • Fabrication of evidence, falsification of data, quoting directly or paraphrasing without proper acknowledgment of the source and/or presenting the ideas of another as your own in a senior thesis, master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation, in scholarly articles submitted to refereed publications or conferences as a student.
      • Willful violation of a canon of an ethical code of the profession for which a student is preparing.
      • Repeated lower level violations such as fourth Level One, third Level Two or second Level Three violation.

      Required sanctions:

      • Reprimanding the student in writing in the form of a letter addressed to the student and copied to the faculty department head, the student’s department head (if different) and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost. The letter should document the academic ethics violation and action taken.  The letter must also advise the student of his/her right to file a grievance and provide the web address of the grievance policy. The Executive Vice President and Provost or designee will notify the student in writing that such action has been taken.
      • Permanent expulsion from the University and a notation of “academic disciplinary separation” on the student’s transcript.

Faculty Senate, approved April 16, 2012
President’s Cabinet, approved August 6, 2012 

Student Conduct

The University of Northern Iowa expects all students to observe university regulations and the city, state, and federal laws, and to fully respect the rights of others. The University Student Conduct Code contains more specific information concerning student conduct and disciplinary action. This information is available by visiting www.uni.edu/deanofstudents/handbook. A printed copy is available in the Dean of Students Office.

Student Records

In the maintenance of student records, and in permitting access to those records or the release of information contained in those records, the University of Northern Iowa complies with the laws of the United States and the State of Iowa.

University policies relative to student records are available at the website www.uni.edu/pres/policies. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and the regulations required by this act may be reviewed in the Office of the Registrar.

Student Persistence

Iowa Regents' Universities have conducted studies annually of student persistence to graduation. A summary of the findings of the most recent study may be secured from the Office of the Registrar.

Student Academic Grievances

Equitable due process in academic matters is provided in grievance procedures for students. Copies are also available in all departmental offices and the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost, Seerley 1 and can be found online at www.uni.edu/policies/1201 (12.01 Student Academic Grievance in the Policies and Procedures Manual).

UNI Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Statement (13.03)

Purpose

To provide guidelines regarding equal opportunity at the University in compliance with applicable federal and state non-discrimination and affirmative action laws and regulations.

Policy Statement

No person shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in employment, any educational program, or any activity of the University, on the basis of age, color, creed, disability, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, veteran status, or on any other basis protected by federal and/or state law.

The University of Northern Iowa prohibits discrimination and promotes affirmative action in its educational and employment policies and practices as required by Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other applicable laws and University policies. The University of Northern Iowa prohibits sexual harassment, including sexual violence.

The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies and serves as the University Title IX Officer: Leah Gutknecht, Assistant to the President for Compliance and Equity Management, Office of Compliance and Equity Management, 117 Gilchrist Hall, UNI, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0028, 319-273-2846, leah.gutknecht@uni.edu.

All major publications of the University will include this non-discrimination policy statement in compliance with Title IX and other non-discrimination regulations.

Office of Compliance and Equity Management, approved March 2002, July 2002
President’s Cabinet, approved April 2002, July 30, 2002

For additional information, contact:

Office of Compliance and Equity Management
117 Gilchrist
University of Northern Iowa
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0028
319-273-2846
or visit www.uni.edu/equity

UNI Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy (13.02)

Purpose: Members of the campus community are entitled to an educational and working environment free of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation.

Policy Statement: The University of Northern Iowa is committed to achieving fairness and equity in all aspects of the educational enterprise and therefore prohibits discrimination, harassment, and retaliation under this policy. Alleged violations of this policy are subject to resolution using the Complaint Resolution Process detailed below. This policy applies regardless of the status of the parties involved, who may be members or non-members of the campus community, students, student organizations, faculty, administrators, and/or staff.

Persons who experience discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct may respond to the experience in many different ways, including feeling confused, vulnerable, out of control, embarrassed, angry, or depressed.  The University provides a variety of resources to assist individuals who have experienced discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct to address the effects of the incident and to help them determine whether and how to make a formal complaint about the incident. Additional resource-related information can be found in Section VIII and at uni.edu/safety.

All reports of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation shall be promptly made to the Title IX Officer (or designated Deputy Coordinator). The Assistant to the President for Compliance and Equity Management serves as the Title IX Officer and ADA/504 Coordinator and oversees implementation of the University’s Affirmative Action Plan and the University’s Policy on Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct. The designated Title IX Deputy Coordinators are the Dean of Students, Senior Associate Athletic Director, and Associate Director of Compliance and Equity Management.  For those individuals who become aware of incidents involving discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct, reporting responsibilities are described in Section III below.  A complainant’s options for reporting are addressed more specifically in Section IV below.

I. Prohibited Conduct

A. Discrimination

The University of Northern Iowa adheres to all federal and state civil rights laws banning discrimination in public institutions of higher education. The University prohibits discrimination against any employee, applicant for employment, student or applicant for admission on the basis of any protected class. Protected classes include: age, color, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender identity, genetic information, marital status, national origin, political affiliation, pregnancy, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, veteran or military status, or any other protected category under applicable federal, state, or local law, including protections for those opposing discrimination or participating in any complaint process on campus or with other human rights agencies.

This policy covers discrimination in employment and in access to educational opportunities. Discrimination is defined as adverse treatment of an individual based on that individual’s membership in one or more of the protected groups listed above. Therefore, any member of the campus community, guest, or visitor who acts to deny, deprive, or limit the educational, employment, housing and/or social access, benefits, and/or opportunities of any member of the campus community on the basis of their actual or perceived membership in the protected classes listed above is in violation of the University policy on discrimination. All University employees shall report all suspected incidents of discrimination or harassment (see Section III. Reporting Responsibilities).  When brought to the attention of the University, any such discrimination will be appropriately remedied by the University according to the procedures outlined in this policy.

B. Harassment

The University prohibits harassment against any employee, student, visitor, or guest on the basis of any class protected by University policy or law as identified in Section I.A. above. This policy is not meant to inhibit or prohibit educational content or discussions inside or outside of the classroom that include germane but controversial or sensitive subject matters. The sections below describe the specific forms of prohibited harassment under University policy.

1. Bias-Related Harassment

This policy prohibits any form of harassment on the basis of actual or perceived membership in a protected class, by any member or group of the campus community, which unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work or academic environment.

This environment may be created by verbal, written, graphic, threatening and/or physical conduct that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive so as to interfere with, limit, or deny the ability of an individual to participate in or benefit from educational programs or activities or employment access, benefits, or opportunities. Merely offensive conduct and/or harassment of a generic nature not on the basis of membership in a protected class may not result in a violation of this policy but may be addressed through education and/or other resolution methods.

2. Sexual Harassment

This policy prohibits any form of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual- or gender-based verbal, written, online, and/or physical conduct. Anyone experiencing sexual harassment in any University program is encouraged to report it online, to the University’s Title IX Officer or a Deputy Coordinator, or by methods identified in the Complaint Resolution Process Section (IV.A. Confidentiality and Reporting of Offenses). Sexual harassment creates a hostile environment and may be disciplined when it is sufficiently severe, pervasive, persistent, or objectively offensive that it:

  • has the effect of unreasonably interfering with, denying, or limiting employment opportunities or the ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s educational, social, and/or residential program, or
  • is based on power differentials (quid pro quo), the creation of a hostile environment, or retaliation.

Some examples of possible sexual harassment include:

  • A professor insists that a student have sex with the professor in exchange for a good grade. This is harassment regardless of whether the student complies with the request.
  • A student repeatedly sends sexually oriented jokes on an e-mail list the student created, even when asked to stop, causing one recipient to avoid the sender on campus and in the residence hall in which they both live.
  • Two supervisors frequently rate several employees’ bodies and sex appeal, commenting suggestively about their clothing and appearance.

Consensual Relationships. Consensual romantic and/or sexual relationships where a power differential exists, whether real or perceived, may constitute sexual harassment. The effect of such a relationship may render an individual’s work, academic, or social environment intimidating, offensive, or hostile. Hence, all University employees are strongly discouraged from entering into romantic and/or sexual relationships which could lead to the creation of a hostile educational, social, and/or work environment for other members of the University community.

3.    Sexual Misconduct

This policy prohibits any form of sexual misconduct. Acts of sexual misconduct may be committed by any person upon any other person, regardless of the sex, gender, sexual orientation, and/or gender identity of those involved. The definition of consent below will be used in the interpretation and application of this policy:

Consent. Consent is knowing, voluntary, and clear permission by word or action to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Since individuals may experience the same interaction in different ways, it is the responsibility of each party to make certain that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. For consent to be valid, there must be a clear expression in words or actions that the other individual consented to that specific sexual conduct. Consent to a specific sexual contact (such as kissing or fondling) cannot be presumed to be consent for another specific sexual activity (such as intercourse). A current or previous dating relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent. Silence or the absence of resistance alone is not consent. The existence of consent is based on the totality of the circumstances, including the context in which the alleged incident occurred. Individuals can withdraw consent at any time during sexual activity by expressing in words or actions that they no longer want the act to continue, and, if that happens, the other person must stop immediately.

A person cannot consent if he or she is incapacitated. Under this policy, a person is incapacitated if he or she is disabled or  deprived of ability to act or reason for one’s self, is unable to understand what is happening, or is disoriented, helpless, asleep, or unconscious for any reason, including due to alcohol or other drugs. Incapacitation is defined as a state where someone cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because they lack the capacity to give knowing consent (e.g., to understand the “who, what, when, where, why, or how” of their sexual interaction). This policy also covers a person whose incapacity results from mental disability, involuntary physical restraint, and/or from taking of an incapacitating substance. Under Iowa law, a person is incapacitated if the person is temporarily incapable of apprising or controlling the person’s own conduct due to the influence of a narcotic, anesthetic, or intoxicating substance; if a person is unable to communicate an unwillingness to act because the person is unconscious, asleep, or is otherwise physically limited; or if the person has a bodily impairment or handicap that substantially limits the person’s ability to resist or flee.

An individual who engages in sexual activity when the individual knows, or should know, that the other person is physically or mentally incapacitated has violated this policy. It is not an excuse that the respondent to a claim of sexual misconduct was intoxicated and, therefore, did not realize the other person’s incapacity.

The following are types of prohibited sexual misconduct under this policy:

a.    Sexual Harassment (defined in Section I.B.2. above)

b.    Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse

Defined as:

  • any sexual penetration or intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal)
  • however slight
  • with any object
  • by a person upon another person
  • that is without consent and/or by force.

Sexual penetration includes vaginal or anal penetration by a penis, tongue, finger, or object, or oral copulation by mouth-to-genital contact or genital-to-mouth contact.

c.    Non-Consensual Sexual Contact

Defined as:

  • any intentional sexual touching
  • however slight
  • with any object
  • by a person upon another person
  • that is without consent and/or by force.

Sexual touching includes any bodily contact with the breasts, groin, genitals, mouth, or other bodily orifice of another individual or any other bodily contact in a sexual manner.

d.     Sexual Exploitation

Defined as:

  • taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another; and
     
  • the conduct does not fall within the definitions of sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual intercourse, or non-consensual sexual contact. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:
    • sexual voyeurism (such as watching a person undressing, using the bathroom, or engaging in sexual acts without the consent of the person observed)
    • taking photographs, video recording, or audio recording of another in a sexual act or in any other private activity without the consent of all persons involved in the activity
    • exceeding the boundaries of consent (such as allowing another person to hide in a closet and observe sexual activity or disseminating sexual pictures without the photographed person’s consent)
    • engaging in sexual activity with another person while knowingly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or other sexually transmitted disease (STD) without informing the other person of the infection
    • administering alcohol or drugs (such as “date rape” drugs) to another person without the person’s knowledge or consent

e.    Relationship Violence

Defined as:

  • violence between those in an intimate relationship (this includes romantic, dating, or domestic relationships). Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • physical assault between two people in a current or prior intimate relationship who do not live together (Dating Violence)
  • physical assault between two people in an intimate relationship who live together (Domestic Violence)

See Section VIII.C. below for the definition of Domestic Violence and Dating Violence under Iowa law.

f.    Stalking

Defined as:

  • a course of conduct
  • directed at a specific person
  • that is unwelcome
  • and would cause a reasonable person to feel fear or suffer substantial emotional distress. Examples include, but are not limited to:
  • sending multiple unwanted text messages, phone calls, or electronic communications
  • following, watching, photographing, or otherwise tracking an individual without his or her permission
  • sending unwelcome gifts, notes, or other items to another person

See Section VIII.C. below for a definition of Stalking under Iowa law.

C.    Retaliation

The University seeks to create an environment where its students and employees are free, without fear of reprisal, to use its procedures to determine if there has been a violation of their civil rights. Any act of retaliation will result in appropriate disciplinary action.

Retaliation is defined as any adverse action taken against a person participating in a protected activity because of their participation in that protected activity. Retaliation against an individual for alleging a violation of their civil rights, supporting a complainant, or for assisting in providing information relevant to a claim, is a serious violation of the this policy. Acts of alleged retaliation should be reported immediately to the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators.  For other acts of alleged retaliation, see Policy 13.19 Retaliation and Misconduct Reporting.

D.    Other Offenses

This policy prohibits other offenses of a discriminatory, harassing, and/or retaliatory nature not included in the previous sections as follows:

  • Intimidation, defined as implied threats or acts that cause a reasonable fear of harm in another on the basis of actual or perceived membership in a protected class
  • Hazing, defined under this policy as acts likely to cause physical or psychological harm or social ostracism to any person within the University community when related to the admission, initiation, pledging, joining, or any other group-affiliation activity on the basis of actual or perceived membership in a protected class. See Section VIII.C. below for a definition of Hazing under Iowa law.
  • Bullying, defined under this policy as repeated and/or severe aggressive behavior likely to intimidate or intentionally hurt, control or diminish another person, physically or mentally on the basis of actual or perceived membership in a protected class. See Section VIII.C. below for a definition of Bullying under Iowa law.
  • Violation of any other University rule, when it is motivated by sex or gender or the actual or perceived membership of the victim in a protected class, may be pursued using this policy and process.

II. Jurisdiction/Application

This policy applies to allegations of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation that take place on UNI property or at university-sponsored events, regardless of their location. This policy may also apply to allegations of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation that occur off-campus or to actions online when the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinator determines that the off-campus or online conduct could have an on-campus impact or impact on the educational mission of the University. Such impact includes:

  • Any action that constitutes a criminal offense as defined by federal, state, or local law;

  • Any situation where it appears that the respondent may present a danger or threat to the health or safety of self or others;

  • Any situation that significantly impinges upon the rights, property, or achievements of others or significantly breaches the peace and/or causes social disorder; and/or

  • Any situation that is detrimental to the educational interests of the University.

The University’s response may be limited if the respondent was a guest or is not subject to the University’s jurisdiction

III.     Reporting Responsibilities

All University employees who are aware of or witness discrimination, harassment, sexual misconduct, or retaliation are required to promptly report to the Title IX Officer or a Title IX Deputy Coordinator. Any student who is aware of or who witnesses discrimination, harassment, sexual misconduct, or retaliation is encouraged to promptly report to the Title IX Officer or a Title IX Deputy Coordinator.  All initial contacts will be treated with the maximum possible privacy: specific information on any complaint received by any party will be reported to the Title IX Officer, but, subject to the University’s obligation to investigate and redress violations, every reasonable effort will be made to maintain the privacy of those initiating a report of a complaint. In all cases, the University will give consideration to the complainant with respect to how the complaint is pursued but reserves the right, when necessary to protect the community, to investigate and pursue a resolution when an alleged victim chooses not to initiate or participate in a formal complaint.

Please note:  This section addresses reporting obligations for members of our campus community who are made aware of potential violations of this policy.  Methods for filing a complaint and the Complaint Resolution Process are detailed in Section IV. Additional resource-related information can be found in Section VIII and at uni.edu/safety.

A.    Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators

University Title IX Officer:

Leah Gutknecht, Assistant to the President for Compliance and Equity Management
117 Gilchrist Hall, 319.273.2846, leah.gutknecht@uni.edu

Title IX Deputy Coordinators:

Leslie Williams, Dean of Students
118 Gilchrist Hall, 319.273.2332, leslie.williams@uni.edu

Jean Berger, Senior Associate Athletic Director
310 UNI-Dome, 319.273.2556, jean.berger@uni.edu

Gwenne Berry, Associate Director of Compliance and Equity Management
117 Gilchrist Hall, 319.273.2846, gwenne.berry@uni.edu 

B.    Role of the Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators

The Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators are charged with coordinating the University response to reports of misconduct under this policy. The Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators do not serve as advocates for either the complainant or the respondent. The Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators will explain to both parties the informal and formal processes outlined below and the provisions for confidentiality. Where appropriate, the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators will provide to both parties information on options for obtaining advocacy, medical and counseling services, and making criminal reports, and will assist with providing information on other resources. The Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators will coordinate with other campus officials to take appropriate interim actions such as no contact orders, academic accommodations, and rearrangement of housing, dining, and work assignments. 

C.    Police Reporting

In addition to required campus reporting, reports may also be made to the police, especially if a crime is or may be involved, by calling the following numbers:

Emergency 9-1-1
UNI Police, 30 Gilchrist Hall, 319.273.2712 (on-campus incidents)
Cedar Falls/Waterloo Police, 319.291.2515 (off-campus incidents)

D.    Federal Timely Warning Obligations

Victims of sexual misconduct should be aware that University administrators must issue crime alerts for incidents reported to them that represent a serious or continuing threat to students or employees. The University will withhold a victim’s name and other identifying information while providing enough information for community members to make safety decisions in light of the potential danger.

IV.    Complaint Resolution Process

The University will respond to any alleged violation of this policy received by the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators.  This section outlines ways in which offenses can be reported by individuals choosing to pursue complaint options.  Additional resource-related information can be found in Section VIII and at uni.edu/safety.

A.    Confidentiality and Reporting of Offenses

The University of Northern Iowa will make every effort to safeguard the identities of individuals who seek help and/or report discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation. While steps are taken to protect the privacy of victims, the University may need to investigate an incident and take action once an allegation is known, whether or not the reporting individual chooses to pursue a complaint.

When a report is made, personally identifiable information (name of victim, name of respondent, etc.) may be initially withheld in cases where the victim is hesitant to come forward. Subsequently, campus officials may need additional information. The University Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinator will conduct an initial inquiry, looking for any sign of pattern, predation, violence, or threat. When such exists, institutional action may be required in an effort to ensure campus safety. No employee should ever promise absolute confidentiality except those as described below in Section IV.A.2. Reports may be private, but not confidential, as described below in Section IV.A.3.  Reports to police and/or Title IX officials do not obligate the complainant to file any criminal or university conduct charges.

The University will not pursue disciplinary action for improper use of alcohol or other drugs against an alleged victim of sexual misconduct or against another student who shares information as either a witness to or as a reporter of sexual misconduct as long as the report is made in good faith. See “Good Samaritan Provision,” Article III(4), Student Conduct Code.

Deliberately false and/or malicious accusations of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, as opposed to complaints which, even if erroneous, are made in good faith, are just as serious an offense as discrimination, harassment, or retaliation and will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.

Complaints and reports should be made as soon as possible after an incident. Information and resources are available through the UNI Safety page, uni.edu/safety. Options for filing a report include: 

1.    Anonymous and Third Party Reporting

The Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators accept anonymous and third-party reports of conduct alleged to violate this policy and will follow up on such reports. The individual making the report is encouraged to provide as much detailed information as possible to allow the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators to investigate and respond as appropriate. The University may be limited in its ability to investigate an anonymous or third party report unless sufficient information is provided.  (See uni.edu/safety to file a report or complaint.) 

2.    Confidential Reporting

If a reporting party would like the details of an incident to be kept confidential, the reporting party may speak with counselors, health service providers, victim services advocates, domestic violence resources, local or state assistance agencies, or members of the clergy who are permitted by law to maintain confidentiality (except in extreme cases of immediacy of threat or danger or abuse of a minor). These sources will submit anonymous statistical information for timely warning and Clery Act purposes. If a reporting party is unsure of a resource’s ability to maintain confidentiality, the reporting party is advised to ask them before talking to them. See uni.edu/safety for additional information on these resources.

UNI counselors for students and/or the Employee Assistance Program for employees are available to help free of charge and can be seen on an emergency basis.

3.    Private Reporting

Reports to University employees who are not confidential resources listed above in Section IV.A.2 will be treated with the maximum possible privacy. If a reporting party is unsure of a resource’s ability to maintain privacy, the reporting party is advised to ask them before talking to them. The resource will be able to explain the resource’s reporting obligations and help a reporting party make decisions about who is in the best position to help. If personally identifiable information is shared, it will be shared with as few people as possible under the circumstances and efforts will be made to protect privacy to the greatest extent reasonably possible. 

4.    Formal Reporting

Complainants are encouraged to speak to University officials, such as the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinators or UNI Police, to make formal reports. Complainants have the right, and can expect, to have complaints taken seriously by the University when formally reported and to have those incidents investigated and properly resolved through these procedures. Formal reporting still affords privacy to the reporter and only a small group of officials who need to know will be told. Information will be shared as necessary with investigator(s), witnesses, and the respondent. The number of people with this knowledge will be kept as low as reasonably possible to preserve a complainant’s rights and privacy. 

5.    Criminal Reporting

If someone is in immediate danger or is a victim of a crime, call 9-1-1. Some acts of discrimination and harassment may also be crimes, such as sexual assault or stalking. Allegations of criminal conduct should be reported to law enforcement even when it is not clear whether the conduct rises to the level of a crime. Regardless, law enforcement can assist with obtaining medical care, getting immediate law enforcement response and protection, connecting with victim advocate services and counseling support, initiating a criminal investigation as appropriate, and answering questions about the criminal process. 

B.    Informal Resolution Process

Informal resolution is an alternative to the formal complaint resolution process. The Title IX Officer will determine if informal resolution is appropriate, based on the willingness of the parties and the nature of the alleged conduct. Sanctions are generally not pursued as the result of an informal resolution process, though the parties may agree to appropriate remedies. The Title IX Officer will keep records of any resolution that is reached. The University reserves the right to cancel informal resolution if sufficient evidence suggests a formal investigation or other sanctions or remedies may be necessary and appropriate.

It is not necessary to pursue informal resolution first in order to make a formal complaint, and anyone participating in informal resolution can stop that process at any time and request to continue through the formal process.

Except in cases involving criminal activity and/or sexual assault, an employee or student alleging discrimination, harassment and/or retaliation against an employee under this policy is encouraged to discuss the allegation with the head of the department in which the alleged discrimination, harassment and/or retaliation occurred. The department head will then consult with the Office of Compliance and Equity Management to determine an appropriate course of action. If it is appropriate, an attempt to facilitate an informal resolution of the matter will be made. In the event that an informal resolution is not reached, is not appropriate, or is not pursued, the student or employee who is alleging the discrimination, harassment, or retaliation may consult with the Office of Compliance and Equity Management to initiate a formal investigation. If, at any time, the employee or student is not comfortable addressing the department head, the Office of Compliance and Equity Management may be contacted directly.

Note: If an allegation includes actions that involve criminal activity and/or sexual assault, reports will be coordinated by the Title IX Officer. Individuals are strongly encouraged to also file a report with UNI Police.

C.    Formal Resolution Process

1.    Filing a Complaint

Any individual who believes that this policy has been violated should contact the Title IX Officer or any Title IX Deputy Coordinator. The University website also includes a reporting form at uni.edu/safety which may serve to initiate a complaint.

a. Complaint Intake

Following receipt of notice or a complaint, the Title IX Officer or Deputy Coordinator will normally, within four business days, make an initial determination as to whether the information has merit to reasonably indicate there may have been a violation of University policy. If it appears a violation may have occurred, an investigation will begin. If the complaint does not appear to allege a policy violation or if conflict resolution is desired by the complainant and appears appropriate given the nature of the alleged behavior, then the complaint does not proceed to investigation. An investigation will be pursued if there is sufficient information to suggest a policy violation may exist, a pattern of misconduct, and/or a perceived threat of further harm to the community or any of its members.

b. Interim Action

The University will implement interim and/or protective actions upon notice of alleged discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation and will take additional prompt remedial and/or disciplinary action with respect to any member of the community, guest, or visitor who has violated this policy.

Interim actions include but are not limited to: no contact orders, no trespass notices, providing counseling and/or medical services, academic support, living arrangement adjustments, providing a campus escort, academic or work schedule and assignment accommodations, safety planning, and referral to campus and community resources.

The University may suspend, on an interim basis, a student or student organization or place an employee on administrative leave pending the completion of the investigation and procedures. In cases in which an interim suspension or administrative leave is imposed, the student, employee, or student organization will be given the opportunity to meet with an appropriate administrator prior to such action being imposed, or as soon thereafter as reasonably possible, to show cause why the action should not be implemented. Violation of interim provisions will be grounds for disciplinary action.

During an interim suspension or administrative leave, a student or employee may be denied access to University housing and/or the University campus, facilities, or events, either entirely or with specific application. As determined by the appropriate administrative officer, this restriction includes classes and/or all other University activities or privileges for which the individual might otherwise be eligible. At the discretion of the appropriate administrative officer, alternative coursework options may be pursued to ensure as minimal an impact as possible on the respondent student. At the discretion of the appropriate administrative officer, alternative employment/work options may be pursued to ensure as minimal an impact as possible on the respondent employee. 

2.    Notice of Charges

Once an investigator has been assigned, written notice of the allegations will be provided to the parties involved. If the respondent is an employee, the written notice will be copied to the employee’s department head/director, dean, vice president, and president. 

3.    Investigation

If a complainant wishes to pursue a formal complaint or if the University determines an investigation is necessary, the Title IX Officer will assign an investigator, usually within two business days of determining that a complaint should proceed. Investigations will be thorough and impartial and will entail interviews with relevant parties and witnesses, and obtaining available evidence. The University aims to complete investigations within 60 days, which can be extended as necessary for appropriate cause by the Title IX Officer with notice to the parties. Investigation may take longer when initial complaints fail to provide direct first-hand information. The University may undertake a short delay (usually 3-10 days, to allow evidence collection) when criminal charges are being investigated. University action will continue regardless of the status of civil or criminal charges involving the same incident.

a. Student Withdrawal While Charges Pending

Should a responding student decide to withdraw from the University and/or not participate in the investigation and/or hearing, the process will nonetheless proceed in the student’s absence to a reasonable resolution and that student will not be permitted to return to the University unless any and all sanctions have been satisfied. The Title IX Officer will continue to act to promptly and effectively remedy the effects of the conduct upon the victim and the community.

b. Employee Resignation While Charges Pending

Should a responding employee resign while charges are pending, the records of the Title IX Officer will reflect that status, as will University responses to any future inquiries regarding employment references for that individual. Should an employee decide to leave and not participate in the investigation and/or hearing, the process will nonetheless proceed in the employee’s absence to a reasonable resolution and that employee will not be permitted to return to the University unless any and all sanctions have been satisfied. The Title IX Officer will continue to act to promptly and effectively remedy the effects of the conduct upon the victim and the community.

4.    Investigation Findings

a.    For Students

Upon receipt of the investigative report, the Title IX Officer will forward it to the Dean of Students or designee for an appropriate hearing per Student Conduct Code procedures. Following the hearing, the decision of whether a policy violation has occurred will be determined by using a preponderance of the evidence standard. A finding of a policy violation by a preponderance of the evidence means that it is more likely than not that the policy violation occurred. If, following the hearing, the decision is that no policy violation has occurred the process will end. Regardless of the outcome, the complainant, the respondent, and the Title IX Officer will be notified of the finding in writing.

If, following a hearing, the student is found to have violated University policy, appropriate disciplinary sanctions will be determined after consultation with the Title IX Officer. The Dean of Students (or designee) will notify the respondent, the complainant, and the Title IX Officer in writing of the Dean of Students’ decision. This written decision must be issued within fifteen working days of the date of receipt of the investigative report from the Title IX Officer.

b.    For Employees

Upon receipt of the investigative report, the Title IX Officer will determine if this policy has been violated by using a preponderance of the evidence standard. A finding of a policy violation by a preponderance of the evidence means that it is more likely than not that the policy violation occurred. If the Title IX Officer decides that no policy violation has occurred, then the process will end. Regardless of the outcome, the complainant and the respondent will be notified of the finding in writing. The respondent’s department head/director, Dean, Vice President, and the President will also be notified of the finding.

In the event that the employee violated University policy, the Vice President of the respondent will determine appropriate disciplinary sanctions based on the recommendation from the Title IX Officer. Regardless of the outcome, the complainant, the respondent, and the Title IX Officer will be notified in writing of the outcome within fifteen working days of the date of the notice from the Title IX Officer. If the Vice President serves as a party or witness in the investigation, the Title IX Officer’s recommendation will be sent to the President for determination of disciplinary sanctions.

5.    Sanctions

Sanctions will be recommended by the Title IX Officer and forwarded to the decision-making authority as noted above in Section IV.C.4. Factors considered when determining a sanction may include:

  • The nature of, severity of, and circumstances surrounding the violation
  • The respondent’s disciplinary history
  • Previously founded complaints or allegations against the respondent involving similar conduct
  • Any other information deemed relevant by the Title IX Officer
  • The need to bring an end to the discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation
  • The need to prevent the future recurrence of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation
  • The need to remedy the effects of the discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation on the victim and the community

a.    Student Sanctions

The following are sanctions that may be imposed upon students under this policy:

  • Warning: A formal statement that the behavior was unacceptable and a warning that any further infraction of any University policy, procedure, or directive may result in more severe sanctions or responsive actions.
  • Probation: A written reprimand for violation of the Student Conduct Code that provides for more severe disciplinary sanctions in the event that the student or organization is found in viola­tion of any University policy, procedure, or directive within a specified period of time. Terms of the probation will be specified and may include denial of specified social privileges, exclusion from co-­curricular activities, no contact orders, and/or other measures deemed appropriate.
  • Deferred Suspension: A serious and final warning that any violation of university policy could result in immediate separation of the student from the University for a specified period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified.
  • Suspension: Termination of student status for a definite period of time and/or until specific criteria are met. This sanction will be noted as a Conduct Suspension on the student’s official transcript. Conditions for readmission may be specified.
  • Expulsion: Permanent termination of student status, revocation of rights to be on campus for any reason, and/or attend University-sponsored events. This sanction will be noted as a Conduct Expulsion on the student’s official transcript.
  • Withholding Diploma: The University may withhold a student’s diploma for a specified period of time and/or deny a student participation in commencement activities if the student has a complaint pending or as a sanction if the student is found responsible for an alleged violation.
  • Revocation of Degree: The University reserves the right to revoke a degree awarded from the University for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of University policies, procedures, or directives in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.
  • Organizational Sanctions: Deactivation, de-recognition, or loss of all privileges (including University registration), for a specified period of time or permanently.
  • Other Actions: In addition to or in place of the above sanctions, the University may assign any other sanction(s) as deemed appropriate.

b.    Employee Sanctions

Sanctions for an employee who has violated this policy may include, but are not limited to, verbal or written warning, required counseling, training, demotion, reassignment, suspension with or without pay, and termination. 

6.    Appeals

Appeals of the decision of the Dean of Students (for students) or the Vice President/President (for employees) may be filed by the complainant or the respondent or both. All requests for appeal considerations must be submitted in writing to the Title IX Officer within five business days of the date of the final written notice.

Appeals are limited to allegations of the following:

  • A procedural error or omission occurred that significantly impacted the outcome.
  • There is new evidence, unknown or unavailable during the investigation, that could substantially impact the finding or sanction. A summary of this new evidence and its potential impact upon the investigation must be included in the appeal.
  • The sanctions imposed are substantially disproportionate to the severity of the violation.

The original finding and sanction/responsive actions will stand if the appeal is not timely or is not based on the grounds listed above, and such a finding and sanction/responsive action(s) are final. When a party requests an appeal, the other party (parties) will be notified and given an opportunity to respond.

For students:  In cases involving student conduct, a person designated by the Vice President for Student Affairs will review the appeal request(s).

For employees:  In cases involving employee conduct, a person designated by the President will review the appeal request(s).

Where the designee finds that at least one of the grounds is met, and proceeds with the appeal, additional principles governing the hearing of appeals include the following:

  • The original decision will only be changed when there is a compelling justification to do so.
  • Appeals are not intended to be full re-hearings of the complaint. Appeals are confined to a review of the written documentation or record of the original hearing and pertinent documentation regarding the grounds for appeal.
  • Sanctions will not be imposed pending the outcome of the appeal. Interim and/or protective actions may be imposed and/or continued as appropriate.
  • The designee will render a decision within ten business days to the Title IX Officer who will normally provide written notice of the appeal to all parties within two to three business days from the date of the appeal review.
  • All parties should be informed of whether the grounds for an appeal are accepted and the results of the appeal decision.
  • Once an appeal is decided, the outcome is final: further appeals are not permitted under this policy.

7.    Failure to Complete Sanctions

All respondents are expected to comply with conduct sanctions within the time frame specified in their written notice. Failure to follow through on conduct sanctions by the date specified, whether by refusal, neglect, or any other reason, may result in additional sanctions and/or suspension, expulsion, and/or termination from the University. For students, failure to comply may result in transcript notation and/or a hold to prevent future registration. 

V.    Remedial Actions

In addition to the interim actions outlined in Section IV.C.1.b, the Title IX Officer (or designee) may provide remedial actions intended to address the short or long-term effects of harassment, discrimination, and/or retaliation. That is, remedial actions may be taken at the conclusion of the process in addition to any actions that may have been taken on an interim basis, in order to redress harm to the complainant and the community and to prevent further harassment or violations. Remedial actions may also be used when, in the judgment of the Title IX Officer (or designee), the safety or well-being of any member(s) of the campus community may be jeopardized by the presence on campus of the respondent or the ongoing activity of a student organization whose behavior is in question.

These remedies may include referral to counseling and health services or to the Employee Assistance Program, education to the community, altering the housing situation of a respondent student or resident employee (or the alleged complainant, if desired), altering work arrangements, providing campus escorts, implementing contact limitations between the parties, or offering adjustments to academic deadlines and/or course schedules. 

VI. Statement of Rights for Complainants and Respondents

Both complainants and respondents will be afforded the following rights under this policy:

  • To be treated with respect by University officials
  • To take advantage of campus support resources (such as Counseling Services and University Health Services for students, or EAP services for employees)
  • To experience a safe educational and work environment
  • To have an advisor (students) or representative (employees) during this process
  • To refuse to have an allegation resolved through informal procedures
  • To be free from retaliation
  • To have complaints heard in substantial accordance with these procedures
  • To reasonable and necessary participation in the process
  • To be informed in writing of the outcome of the complaint and, where permissible, sanctions, and the rationale for the outcome

VII. Records

In implementing this policy, records of all complaints, resolutions, and hearings will be kept by the Title IX Officer indefinitely in the Office of Compliance and Equity Management.

VIII. Resources 

A.    University Title IX Officer and Deputy Coordinators

Contact information on the Title IX Officer and Deputies can be found above in Section III.A. and at www.uni.edu/equity/title-ix-reporting. 

B.    External Sources

A complainant may choose to file a complaint with the state and federal agencies listed below.

Office for Civil Rights (OCR) – Chicago Office
U.S. Department of Education
Citigroup Center
500 W. Madison Street, Suite 1475
Chicago, IL 60661
Phone: (312) 730-1560
Fax: (312) 730-1576 
TDD: (877) 521-2172
Email: OCR.Chicago@ed.gov
Web: www.ed.gov/ocr

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Reuss Federal Plaza
310 W. Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800
Milwaukee, WI 53203-2292
Phone: (800) 669-4000
Fax: (414) 297-4133
TTY: (800) 669-6820
Web: www.eeoc.gov/

Iowa Civil Rights Commission (ICRC)
Grimes State Office Building
400 E. 14th Street
Des Moines, IA 50319
Toll free: (800) 457-4416
Phone: (515) 281-4121
Fax: (515) 242-5840
TDD: (877) 521-2172
Web: https://icrc.iowa.gov/

C.    Iowa State Law Definitions

1. Hazing

Under Iowa Code § 708.10, a person commits an act of hazing when the person intentionally or recklessly engages in any act or acts involving forced activity which endanger the physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of initiation or admission into, or affiliation with, any organization operating in connection with a school, college, or university. Prohibited acts include, but are not limited to, any brutality of a physical nature such as whipping, forced confinement, or any other forced activity which endangers the physical health or safety of the student. Under § 708.10, forced activity means any activity which is a condition of initiation or admission into, or affiliation with, an organization, regardless of a student’s willingness to participate in the activity.

2. Stalking

Under Iowa Code § 708.11, a person commits stalking when all of the following occur: (a) The person purposefully engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear bodily injury to, or the death of, that specific person or a member of the specific person’s immediate family. (b) The person has knowledge or should have knowledge that the specific person will be placed in reasonable fear of bodily injury to, or the death of, that specific person or a member of the specific person’s immediate family by the course of conduct. (c) The person’s course of conduct induces fear in the specific person of bodily injury to, or the death of, the specific person or a member of the specific person’s immediate family.

3. Bullying

Harassment and bullying are defined in Iowa Code § 280.28 as any electronic, written, verbal, or physical act or conduct toward a student which is based on any actual or perceived trait or characteristic of the student and which creates an objectively hostile school environment that meets one or more of the following conditions: (1) Places the student in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s person or property.  (2) Has a substantially detrimental effect on the student’s physical or mental health. (3) Has the effect of substantially interfering with a student’s academic performance. (4) Has the effect of substantially interfering with the student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by a school.

4. Domestic Violence and Dating Violence

Domestic violence and dating violence are covered by Iowa Code § 236.2, which defines “domestic abuse.” Domestic abuse means committing assault as defined in section 708.1 (criminal assault) under any of the following circumstances:

a.  The assault is between family or household members who resided together at the time of the assault.
b.  The assault is between separated spouses or persons divorced from each other and not residing together at the time of the assault.
c.  The assault is between persons who are parents of the same minor child, regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time.
d.  The assault is between persons who have been family or household members residing together within the past year and are not residing together at the time of the assault.
e.  (1) The assault is between persons who are in an intimate relationship or have been in an intimate relationship and have had contact within the past year of the assault. In determining whether persons are or have been in an
intimate relationship, the court may consider the following nonexclusive list of factors: (a) The duration of the relationship. (b) The frequency of interaction. (c) Whether the relationship has been terminated. (d) The nature of the relationship, characterized by either party’s expectation of sexual or romantic involvement.
(2) A person may be involved in an intimate relationship with more than one person at a time.

D. Other University Policies

3.02 Student Conduct Code 

13.03 Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Statement

13.19 Retaliation and Misconduct Reporting Policy

13.20 Duty to Report Child Abuse

13.15 Accommodations of Disabilities

E. Support Resources

uni.edu/safety

Violence Intervention Services

Revisions:  These policies and procedures will be reviewed and updated regularly by the Title IX Officer. The Title IX Officer may make minor modifications to procedure that do not materially change the process. However, the Title IX Officer may also vary procedures materially with notice (on the University’s policy website, with appropriate date of effect identified) upon determining that changes to law or regulation require policy or procedural alterations not reflected in this policy and procedure. Procedures in effect at the time of its implementation will apply. Policy in effect at the time of the offense will apply even if the policy is changed subsequently, unless the parties consent to be bound by the current policy or applicable law requires otherwise. 

Office of Compliance and Equity Management; and Office of Dean of Students, approved December 23, 2013
President’s Cabinet, approved May 12, 2014
President and Executive Management Team, approved June 6, 2014

Accommodations of Disabilities (13.15)

Purpose: 

To provide guidelines regarding the University’s compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), and other applicable federal and state laws and regulations.

Policy Statement:

No qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of the University, or be subjected to unlawful discrimination by the University.  This policy applies to all aspects of campus activities including employment, education, student programming, and services provided to the community at-large. 

Students:  In order to receive assistance with requests for accommodations, a student with a disability must contact Student Disability Services. 

Employees:  An employee with a disability who wishes to request an accommodation must contact his/her/their supervisor or Faculty and Staff Disability Services located in Human Resource Services.  All University employees in a supervisory capacity are required to report to Faculty and Staff Disability Services any such request for accommodation received. 

Events:  Any individual (student, university employee or visitor) who plans to attend an event on campus and wishes to request an accommodation should contact the venue hosting the event.  Visitors may also contact Faculty and Staff Disability Services for assistance. 

To ensure accessibility in all programs and events, the following statement is to be placed in program announcements:

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UNI-sponsored events.  If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact (sponsoring department or contact person) at (telephone number and email) at least one week prior to the event.

If the event includes a meal, the following statement should be added:

If you have special dietary needs, please contact (sponsoring department or contact person) at (telephone number and email).

If a text telephone (TTY) number is available, it should be included in the program announcements. 

It is the responsibility of the sponsoring department to arrange necessary accommodations.  The sponsoring department should identify the individual(s) responsible for handling accommodation requests. 

While the university will not deny a request based on a deadline, advance notice can be requested.  The university must make a good faith effort to provide reasonable accommodations whenever a request is received. 

If an employee or student feels his/her/their rights under the Rehabilitation Act, the ADA, and/or the ADAAA have been violated, he/she/they may consult with the Office of Compliance and Equity Management and/or utilize the procedures outlined in the Discrimination and Harassment Policy.   The Assistant to the President for Compliance and Equity Management is the designated ADA Compliance Officer. 

For additional information, visit www.uni.edu/disability or contact the Office of Compliance and Equity Management, 117 Gilchrist, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA  50614-0028, 319-273-2846, equity@uni.edu, www.uni.edu/equity.  

Office of Compliance and Equity Management, approved August 2013
President’s Cabinet, approved December 19, 2013, to be effective January 1, 2014