2019-20 Academic Catalog
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Department of Biology

(College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences)

www.biology.uni.edu

The Department of Biology offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs. Specific requirements for these programs are listed within this Department of Biology section in the following order:

Undergraduate Major (B.S.)

Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)

Minors

Graduate Major (M.S.)

Graduate Majors (P.S.M.)

Major programs are offered by the Department of Biology in two baccalaureate  areas: the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. The Bachelor of Science degree is recommended for most students preparing for graduate study in biology. The Bachelor of Arts degree provides a choice among several tracks depending upon student interest and/or career plans.

Note: Students should submit their declaration of a biology major early in their college programs. This will permit them to plan their major courses with a department advisor to avoid future conflicts. Transfer students with previous courses in biology, zoology, or botany must have transfer courses evaluated to avoid duplication and possible loss of credit. Decisions regarding UNI major courses and transfer credits should be approved by the department head or advisor.

Academic Standard Policy 

Majors

  1. Students should indicate their interest in majoring in biology by filling out a Declaration of Curriculum form any time after their admission to UNI.
  2. A student's freshman year shall be devoted primarily to completing the required course work in general biology (BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity and BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function ) and chemistry (CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I and CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II , or CHEM 1130 (860:070) General Chemistry I-II ). Liberal Arts Core and/or math classes should be taken by students to complete their schedules.
  3. Students must receive a grade of C- (1.67) or higher in courses that are applied to their major. Prior to enrollment in a course, all prerequisites must be completed with a C- (1.67) or higher.
  4. ALEKS is a mathematics placement exam used at the University of Northern Iowa. Your academic advisor will use your score on the ALEKS assessment to determine your placement in UNI mathematics, chemistry, and physics courses.
  5. If a student drops a course after the first seven days of classes, in the subsequent semester they will only be allowed to register for that course after all advanced registration is completed.
  6. To graduate from UNI with a biology major, students must have both a cumulative and a major UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher, with a grade of C- (1.67) or higher in all courses that are applied to the major.
  7. To graduate from UNI with a biology major, students must take at least four (4) hours of biology at the 4000 level at UNI.
  8. Transfer students entering UNI shall be subject to the acceptance requirements listed in #3.

Minors

To graduate from UNI with a biology minor, students must have both a cumulative and a minor UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher, with a grade of C- (1.67) or higher in all courses that are applied to the minor.

Bachelor of Science Degree Program

Emphasis-Honors Research

Students invited to do Honors Research will complete 4 credit hours of BIOL 3190 (840:190) Undergraduate Research in Biology and 1 credit hour of BIOL 3191 (840:191) Senior Thesis.

Biology Major

The B.S. Biology major requires a minimum of 126 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 126 hours. 

The Bachelor of Science Biology major is designed to prepare students for careers in areas which require a higher degree of concentration in subject matter and cognate areas, particularly advanced-level courses. This degree is especially appropriate for students planning graduate study. In order to ensure graduation within eight semesters, students should work with advisors early in their programs, as advanced planning for sequenced courses is very important.

Course List

Required: *
Introductory track: 15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
Genetics **
Biology:5-6
Undergraduate Research in Biology
Biostatistics
Cognate courses:
Mathematics: 4
Calculus I §
Chemistry and Biochemistry: 16
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II ***
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Physics: 8
General Physics I
General Physics II
Electives in Biology: ^, †19-20
or
Calculus II
or
Biochemistry I
Total hours68

Environmental Science Major

The B.S. Environmental Science program will include two curricular paths for students, one with a life science emphasis and the other with an earth science emphasis.  The program will enable students to prepare for a graduate program in the environmental sciences or to directly enter industry in the public or private sector.  All students will have a common core of courses providing a foundation in biology and geosciences, and will also be required to take part in a capstone research project.*

Required Core32
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Elements of Weather
Introduction to Geology
Geographic Information Systems I
Calculus I
Undergraduate Research in Biology **
Undergraduate Research in Earth and Environmental Science
Environmental Life Sciences Track33
Required:7
Biostatistics **
Ecology **
Electives:26
Pick courses from each of the three categories (A, B, & C) to accumulate to a minimum of 26 hours.
Category A - Content Policy Related Courses (select a minimum of 2 courses)
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Biodiversity Conservation Policy **
Conservation Biology **
Category B - Content Biology Related Courses (select a minimum of 2 courses)
Invertebrate Zoology
Plant Diversity and Evolution
Entomology
Aquatic Ecology
Mammalogy
Plant Systematics
Restoration Ecology
Category C - Cognates (select a minimum of 2 courses)
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry I
Earth History
Meteorology
Air Quality
Structural Geology
Sedimentary Geology
Geomorphology
Oceanography
Environmental Geology
Environmental Hydrology
Hydrogeology
Field and Laboratory Methods in Hydrology
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
Environmental Geography: Variable Topic
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
The Ice Age **
Geographic Information Systems II
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Calculus II
Environmental Earth Science Track33
Required:13
Introduction to Environmental Earth Science
Air Quality
Environmental Geology
Environmental Hydrology
Electives:20
Pick courses from each of the Categories (A & B) to accumulate a minimum of 20 hours
Category A - Physical Environment Relate Courses (select a minimum of 4 courses)
Earth History
Meteorology
Air Quality Modeling
Measurement and Analysis of Air Quality
Structural Geology
Earth Materials
Sedimentary Geology
Paleoclimatology
Geomorphology
Oceanography
Hydrogeology
Field and Laboratory Methods in Hydrology
Category B - Cognates (select a minimum of 2 courses)
Invertebrate Zoology
Plant Diversity and Evolution
Entomology **
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Biodiversity Conservation Policy **
Aquatic Ecology **
Biostatistics **
Mammalogy **
Plant Systematics **
Conservation Biology **
Ecology **
Restoration Ecology **
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry I
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
Environmental Geography: Variable Topic **
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
The Ice Age **
Geographic Information Systems II
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Calculus II
Total Hours65

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

Emphasis-Honors Research

Students invited to do Honors Research will complete 4 credit hours of BIOL 3190 (840:190) Undergraduate Research in Biology and 1 credit hour of BIOL 3191 (840:191) Senior Thesis.

Biology Major

The B.A. Biology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. 

This major provides a broad training in biology but allows different specializations through choice of electives. Students who select this major to prepare themselves for graduate study in the biological sciences should consult with their advisor for elective courses. Field courses offered during the summer program at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory may be accepted for biology elective credit.

Required: *
Introductory track:15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
Genetics **
Cognate courses:
Mathematics:4-5
Select one of the following:
Trigonometry
and Mathematics for Biological Sciences
Precalculus
Calculus I
Chemistry and Biochemistry: ***12-13
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
Earth Science/Physics (select one of the following):8
Introduction to Geology
and Earth History
General Physics I
and General Physics II
Electives in Biology: ^, †17-19
or
Organic Chemistry II
or
Biochemistry I
Total hours58

Biology Major: Biomedical Emphasis

The B.A. Biology Major: Biomedical Emphasis requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

This major offers basic preparation to students for allopathic, osteopathic, chiropractic, pharmacy, physical therapy, dental, veterinary, optometric, podiatric and other health-related programs. In addition, it prepares students for graduate study in biomedical sciences, e.g., pharmacology, toxicology, pathology, physiology, cellular biology, and related areas. Students should seek advice and information early in their programs so that individual goals and specific additional requirements of some graduate and professional programs can be considered in curricular planning.

Required: *
Introductory track:15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
Genetics **
Anatomy group:4
Select one of the following:
Vertebrate Anatomy
Developmental Biology of Animals ^
Developmental Plant Anatomy
Physiology group:4
Select one of the following:
Comparative Animal Physiology
Plant Physiology
Vertebrate Physiology
Cellular group:4
Select one of the following:
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology of Animals ^
Immunology
Cognate courses:
Mathematics:4-5
Select one of the following:
Precalculus
Calculus I
Trigonometry
and Mathematics for Biological Sciences
Chemistry and Biochemistry:16
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II ***
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Physics:8
General Physics I
General Physics II
Electives selected from the following (consult with advisor):2-3
Biology:
Anatomy and Physiology II
Vertebrate Anatomy
Vertebrate Histology
Cancer and Emerging Infectious Diseases
General Microbiology
Field Zoology of Vertebrates
Entomology
Undergraduate Research in Biology
Comparative Animal Physiology
Neurobiology
Plant Physiology
Cell Biology
Animal Behavior
Vertebrate Physiology
Evolutionary Biology
Virology
Developmental Biology of Animals
Immunology
Microbial Molecular Biology
Recombinant DNA Techniques
Biostatistics
Mammalogy
Ecology
Developmental Plant Anatomy
Chemistry and Biochemistry:
Biochemistry I
Total hours58

Biology Major: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Emphasis

The B.A. Biology Major: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Emphasis requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. 

This emphasis provides training to students interested in organismal and/or ecological biology. With the guidance of a faculty advisor, students who wish to specialize further may follow one of four separate tracks: Ecology, Applied Ecology, Plant Sciences, or Zoology. This emphasis is appropriate for students interested in a career with private and governmental organizations conducting endangered species recovery, ecological restoration, biological surveys, toxicity evaluations, environmental impact analyses, field research, museum or herbarium curation, or who wish to work in zoos, nature centers, museums, or botanical gardens. This emphasis also provides suitable background for students wishing to pursue graduate degrees in animal behavior, botany, conservation biology, ecology, environmental toxicology, evolutionary biology, systematics, population biology, and zoology. Students should seek advice and information early in their programs so that individual goals and specific additional requirements of some graduate and professional programs can be considered in curricular planning. Field courses offered during the summer program at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory may be accepted for biology elective credit.

Required: *
Introductory track:15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
Genetics **
Cognate courses:
Mathematics:4-5
Select one of the following:
Precalculus
Calculus I
Trigonometry
and Mathematics for Biological Sciences
Chemistry and Biochemistry:12-13
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II ***
Select one of the following:
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Physical Science4
Introduction to Geology
General Physics I
Electives: select from the following (consult with advisor):21-23
Biology: ^
Vertebrate Anatomy
Environmental Physiology
Invertebrate Zoology
Marine Biology
Plant Diversity and Evolution
Field Zoology of Vertebrates
Entomology
Field Biology: ___________
Readings in Biology
Undergraduate Research in Biology
Wildlife Ecology and Management
Biodiversity Conservation Policy
Comparative Animal Physiology
Plant Physiology
Animal Behavior
Vertebrate Physiology
Evolutionary Biology
Developmental Biology of Animals
Aquatic Ecology
Biostatistics
Mammalogy
Plant Systematics
Conservation Biology
Ecology
Developmental Plant Anatomy
Restoration Ecology
Independent Study
Earth Science/Geography:
Select one of the following:
Fossils and Evolution
Geographic Information Systems I
Soils and Landscapes
Total hours58

Biology Major-Teaching (Extended Program)

The B.A. Biology-Teaching major requires a minimum of 131 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, and the following specified major requirements to complete the minimum of 131 hours.

The Biology Teaching major provides a broad education in biology. Along with professional education courses and student teaching, this curriculum is a sound preparation for teaching life science, biology, and other secondary science courses. This is an extended program requiring at least nine semesters; therefore, students should contact their advisors early in their program. This program is an excellent preparation for graduate work in biology or science education.

Required: *
Introductory track:15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science **
Genetics **
Evolutionary Biology:3
Evolutionary Biology
Plant group:4
Select one of the following:
Plant Diversity and Evolution
Plant Physiology
Plant Systematics
Developmental Plant Anatomy
Animal group:4
Select one of the following:
Anatomy and Physiology II ***
Vertebrate Anatomy
Comparative Animal Physiology
Developmental Biology of Animals
Cellular group:4
Select one of the following:
General Microbiology
Cell Biology
Cognate courses:
Chemistry and Biochemistry:12
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II ^
Earth Science:4
Earth History
Physics:4
General Physics I
Methods:
Science and Science Education:4
Orientation to Science Teaching
Teaching:1
Secondary and Special-Area Classroom Management
Biology:4
Undergraduate Practicum in Biology Teaching
Methods for Teaching Life Science
Electives in Biology: 4
Total Hours63

Combined B.A./M.S. or B.S./M.S. Program Biology

The B.A./M.S. or B.S./M.S. degree program is a five-year program offered on the thesis option only, leading to both the B.A./B.S. and M.S. degrees in biology. This program prepares students for doctoral graduate studies in biology and it provides training for work as a biologist in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. Students interested in this program can declare their intent by the end of the junior year, provided they have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or above. An Application for Admission to Graduate Study should be completed and the student’s interest in the Combined B.A./M.S. or B.S./M.S. Program in Biology indicated on the application itself. Graduate information and an application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

Once admitted to the program, undergraduate students (who are classified as seniors), may register for a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit as a senior, with the approval of the student’s advisor, the instructor of the course(s), and the head(s) of the department(s) offering the course(s). See policies and procedures for Graduate Credit for Undergraduate Students. Actual admission to graduate study and classification as a graduate student commences the term after the student has completed the baccalaureate.

Refer to the M.S. Biology Major for program requirements.

Environmental Resource Management Major

The Environmental Resource Management major is aimed at students searching for career options in the broadly-defined 'outdoor environment' that are related to natural resources, environmental systems, and sustainable development. This program will prepare students for careers in the environmental and human management of public and private spaces across differing categories of environmental systems - from public parks and lands to conservancy units managed by governmental and other non-profit agencies and organizations. This program aims to serve those students who do not wish to pursue careers as environmental scientists per se from more tightly focused 'environmental science' programs.

  • STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THE CORE REQUIREMENTS (31 HOURS) AND MAY CHOOSE ONLY ONE OF THE FOUR SPECIALIZATION TRACKS (30-32 HOURS).
  • Each track is composed of clusters of courses with a specific concentration, each of which has a separate hourly requirement.
  • For purposes of this degree program, those prerequisite courses required by BIOL, EARTHSCI, GEOG, and KAHHS for mid/upper-level courses in each Track THAT ARE NOT INCLUDED IN THE CORE REQUIREMENTS will normally be waived by the appropriate departments.
  • The separate tracks allow students to specialize in the area of most general interest while the primary & secondary foci within each track make sure students also are exposed to a wide range of important auxiliary coursework.
  • By permission of the Provost’s Office, students enrolled in the B.A. Environmental Resource Management major will be considered majors in all four of the participating departments.
Core Requirements
BIOL 2051 (840:051)General Biology: Organismal Diversity4
BIOL 3100 (840:100)Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science *3
CHEM 1110 (860:044)General Chemistry I4
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031)Introduction to Geology4
or
Physical Geography
and Physical Geography Laboratory
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g)Geomorphology4
GEOG 4260Environmental Resource Management3
GEOG 3310 (970:164)Geographic Information Systems I3
LYHS 4320Financial Resource Management in Leisure, Youth and Human Services3
HISUS 4170/5170U.S. Environmental History3
Total Hours31

Encouraged Certificates: Certificate programs that are appropriate to couple with the ERM major and help to expand specific, relevant experiences for students.

    - GIS & Cartography (Department of Geography)

    - Sustainability (Interdisciplinary)

    - Outdoor Recreation (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Tourism (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Nonprofit Management Certificate (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Environmental Health Certificate (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Public History (Department of History)

Ecosystems Track

A total of 32 hours are needed for this track. There are 12 hours of required courses. In addition, student select courses from all three elective categories (A, B, & C) to accumulate to a minimum of 20 hours. At least one course must be taken from each elective category.

Required
BIOL 4168/5168 (840:168g)Ecology **4
CHEM 1120 (860:048)General Chemistry II4
MATH 1140 (800:046)Precalculus4
Electives:20
Category A - Content Management Related Courses (pick at least 1 course)
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Biodiversity Conservation Policy **
Conservation Biology **
Restoration Ecology **
Category B - Content Related Courses (pick at least 1 course)
Invertebrate Zoology *
Marine Biology *
Entomology *
Aquatic Ecology **
Biostatistics **
Mammalogy **
Plant Systematics **
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)
Geographic Information Systems II
Category C - Cognates (pick at least 1 course)
Elements of Weather
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers ^
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental Geography: Variable Topic ^
Soils and Landscapes
The Ice Age ^
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
Regional Landforms of North America
Remote Sensing of the Environment
History of Outdoor Recreation
Foundations of Tourism
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Leadership Skills ^
Project Management ^
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Total Hours32

Geosystems Track

A total of 30 hours are needed for this track, with a minimum of 21 hours from the Primary Focus group and 9 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Electives
Primary Focus - Content Related Courses21
Elements of Weather
Environmental Hydrology ^
Earth Materials ^
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental Geography: Variable Topic * ^
or
Environmental Geology ***
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector
Secondary Focus - Management Cognates9
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Restoration Ecology **
Sedimentary Geology ****
Field and Laboratory Methods in Hydrology
Environmental Economics ^
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers ^
Regional Analysis and Planning
The Ice Age *
Regional Landforms of North America
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic) ^
Geographic Information Systems II ^
Foundations of Tourism
History of Outdoor Recreation
History of Outdoor Recreation
Eco, Adventure and Sport Tourism #
Project Management ^
Public Budgeting ^
Cooperative Education ^
Cooperative Education in Geography
Internship
Internship in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours30

Resource Administration Track

A total of 30 hours are needed for this track, with a minimum of 21 hours from the Primary Focus group and 9 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Primary Focus - Content Related Courses21
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
Regional Analysis and Planning
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations
Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector
Human Resource Development for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Areas and Facilities in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
History of Outdoor Recreation
Eco, Adventure and Sport Tourism ^
Secondary Focus - Cognates9
Conservation Biology **
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
Regional Landforms of North America
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)
Geographic Information Systems II
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Applied Writing: Specialized Documents ^
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers
Environmental Health Science
Foundations of Tourism
Theory and Practice of Outdoor Education
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Community Planning Workshop
Project Management ^
Public Budgeting ^
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours30

Environmental Compliance Track

A total of 32 hours need for this focus area, with 15 hours of required courses, a minimum of 10 hours from the Primary Focus group and 7 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Required
ECON 1041 (920:053)Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 1051 (920:054)Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 3225/5225 (920:123g)Environmental Economics3
HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g)Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations3
PHIL 2550Environmental Ethics3
Primary Focus - Content Related Courses10
Elements of Weather
Introduction to Environmental Earth Science
Air Quality ^
Environmental Geology *
or
Environmental Geography: Variable Topic
Environmental Hydrology *
Secondary Focus - Cognates7
Air Quality Modeling ^
Measurement and Analysis of Air Quality ** ^
Sedimentary Geology ***
Hydrogeology *
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Environmental Health Science
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Organizational Management *
Project Management ^
Introduction to Public Administration
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours32
 

Minors

Biology Minor

Required:
Introductory track:8
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Chemistry and Biochemistry:8
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II *
Electives in Biology: **10-12
Total Hours26-28

 

Biology Minor-Teaching

The Biology Minor-Teaching provides for second endorsement approval by the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners and requires first endorsement approval (major) in another science discipline or general science.

Required:
Introductory track:15
General Biology: Organismal Diversity
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science *
Genetics *
Chemistry and Biochemistry:8
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II **
Methods:
Science and Science Education:4
Orientation to Science Teaching
Teaching:1
Secondary and Special-Area Classroom Management
Biology:3
Methods for Teaching Life Science
Total Hours31

Master of Science Degree Program

Major in Biology

This major is available for students seeking an extensive research experience. Students interested in enrolling in the program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Biology for any other application requirements. Applications should include three recommendations and transcripts of undergraduate and graduate credits. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis option only. A minimum of 32 semester hours is required, including a minimum of 21 hours of normal course work and a maximum of 9 hours of thesis research. A minimum of 18 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required.

Students are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination in defense of their final thesis.

This program is flexible and designed to allow students, working with their advisory committee, to tailor a program to fit student interests and aspirations in biology.

Required:
200/6000-level Biology courses:6
Take one course in at least two of the content areas (prerequisites vary) **
Biology:5
Graduate Colloquium (1 hr. each semester for four semesters)
Research Methods in Biology (1 hr.)
Research:9
Research
Electives: *12
Total Hours32

Professional Science Master’s Degree Programs

Major in Biotechnology

This P.S.M. degree prepares students for career opportunities in biotechnology-related businesses and industries. Emphasis is placed on combining molecular and genetic engineering skills with an understanding of business and the degree includes an internship experience. Admission is restricted to students with a GPA of 3.00 or higher and a B.A. or B.S. in Biotechnology, Biology, Biochemistry or a related discipline. Students must have taken an Introductory General Biology sequence, Genetics and one or more courses in Molecular Biology or equivalents to be considered.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Biology for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made. 

This major is available on the non-thesis option only. A minimum of 30 semester hours is required. A minimum of 12 semester hours of 200/6000-level course work is required.

SUSPENDING PROGRAM.  NO ADMITS HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED SINCE FALL 2014.

Required:
Biology:
BIOL 4153/5153 (840:153g)Recombinant DNA Techniques4
BIOL 6215Advanced Molecular Cloning3
BIOL 6240 (840:240)Advanced Cellular and Molecular Biology3
BIOL 6280 (840:280)Advanced Analytical Techniques2
Science and Science Education:5-7
Professional Science Master's Seminar (1 hr.)
Professional Science Master's Internship (4-6 hrs.)
Business and Marketing:
Business fundamentals course (approved by advisor)3
MKTG 3586/5586 (130:175g)Entrepreneurial Strategy3
Electives (must be 100g/5000-level or above):5-7
Select from the following or other graduate level courses as approved by advisor:
Biology:
Plant Biotechnology
Plant Physiology
Bioinformatics Applications for Biology
Cell Biology
Genomics
Virology
Developmental Biology of Animals
Immunology
Biostatistics
Applied Statistical Methods for Research
Research (1-2 hrs.)
Chemistry and Biochemistry:
Biochemistry I
Biochemistry II
Biochemistry Laboratory
Total Hours 30

Major in Ecosystem Management

This P.S.M. degree prepares students for career opportunities in conservation and restoration-related businesses, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is placed on blending ecosystem analysis, management and restoration skills with an understanding of conservation policy, and the degree includes a team project and an internship experience. Admission is restricted to students with a GPA of 3.00 or higher and a B.A. or B.S. in Biology, Ecology or related field. Majors in Agriculture, Geography and other related applied disciplines must take or have taken an introductory biology sequence to be considered.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Biology for other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made. 

This major is available on the non-thesis option only. A minimum of 30 semester hours is required. A minimum of 15 semester hours of 200/6000-level course work is required.

SUSPENDING PROGRAM.  NO ADMITS HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED SINCE FALL 2014.

Required:
Biology:
BIOL 4108/5108Biodiversity Conservation Policy3
BIOL 4166/5166 (840:166g)Plant Systematics4
BIOL 4180/5180 (840:180g)Restoration Ecology4
BIOL 6260 (840:260)Advanced Ecology3
Science and Science Education:
PSM 6100 (820:209)Business Management for Science Professionals3
PSM 6300 (820:215)Team-Based Problem Solving3
PSM 6289 (820:289)Professional Science Master's Seminar2
PSM 6950 (820:295)Professional Science Master's Internship4
Electives (must be 100g/5000-level or above):4
Select from the following or other graduate level courses as approved by advisor.
Biology:
Wildlife Ecology and Management
Animal Behavior
Evolutionary Biology
Aquatic Ecology
Biostatistics
Applied Statistical Methods for Research
Mammalogy
Conservation Biology
Earth Science:
Geomorphology
Environmental Hydrology
Hydrogeology
Geography:
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Global Positioning System Field Survey Methods
Iowa Lakeside Laboratory: **
Aquatic Ecology
Plant Ecology
Prairie Ecology
Wetland Ecology
Ornithology
Watershed Hydrology and Surficial Processes
Soil Formation & Landscape Relationships
Total Hours 30

Biology, B.S.

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology (organization of life, diversity and its causes, genetics, and cellular biology) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in biological topics of the student’s interest in areas including anatomy, physiology, genetics, organismal development, ecology, evolution, and/or organismal biology. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics.  Students in the BS program will gain deeper exposure to the process of science through Undergraduate Research (BIOL 3190) and through Biostatistics (BIOL 4157).

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in advanced content from their areas of interest in the fields of anatomy, physiology, development, cellular biology, immunology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and/or organismal biology.  

  2. Students will communicate effectively using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard scientific communication skills such as graphical representation of data.

  3. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to living organisms.

  4. Students will gain first-hand experience with the process of scientific inquiry by participating in a specific line of research.

  5. Students will become proficient in common statistical methods used in biology.

Biology, B.A.

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology (organization of life, diversity and its causes, genetics, and cellular biology) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in biological topics of the student’s interest in areas including anatomy, physiology, genetics, organismal development, ecology, evolution, and/or organismal biology. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics.

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in advanced content from their areas of interest in the fields of anatomy, physiology, development, cellular biology, immunology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and/or evolutionary biology.

  2. Students will communicate effectively using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard scientific communication skills such as graphical representation of data.

  3. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to living organisms.

Biology: Biomedical Major, B.A. 

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology (organization of life, diversity and its causes, genetics, and cellular biology) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in topics related to biomedical fields. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics.

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in advanced content from their areas of interest in the fields of anatomy, physiology, development, cellular biology, immunology, and/or genetics.

  2. Students will communicate effectively using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard scientific communication skills such as graphical representation of data.

  3. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to living organisms.

Biology: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, B.A. 

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology (organization of life, diversity and its causes, genetics, and cellular biology) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in topics in ecology, evolution, and organismal biology. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics.

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in advanced content from the fields of ecology, evolution, and/or organismal biology that will allow students to explain biodiversity and the relationship of living things with their environment and with each other.

  2. Students will communicate effectively using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard written and oral scientific communication skills.

  3. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to natural systems.

Biology Teaching, B.A.

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology (organization of life, diversity and its causes, genetics, and cellular biology) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in biological topics of the student’s interest in areas including anatomy, physiology, genetics, organismal development, ecology, evolution, and/or organismal biology. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics in ways that allow them to become excellent educators.

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in advanced content from their areas of interest in the fields of anatomy, physiology, development, cellular biology, immunology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and/or evolutionary biology.

  2. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to living organisms.

  3. Students will communicate effectively using appropriate teaching strategies for a classroom setting.

Environmental Resource Management: Ecosystems, B.A.

Goals:  Students will gain an understanding of major themes in biology related to ecosystems (organization of life, diversity and its causes) along with deeper exposure to and advanced competency in topics related to ecosystems and their management. Students will be able to think critically and communicate effectively on these discipline-specific topics.

Outcomes:

  1. Students show proficiency in advanced content from the fields of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology that will allow students to evaluate issues important to modern ecosystem management.

  2. Students will communicate effectively using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard written and oral scientific communication skills.

  3. Students will think critically about discipline-specific content as evidenced by an ability to interpret data, to effectively critique arguments, and/or to solve problems relating to natural systems.

Environmental Resource Management: Environmental Compliance, B.A.

Communication

SLO 3: Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills related to geographic knowledge.

Critical Thinking

SLO 2: Demonstrate abilities in critical thinking and intellectual synthesis including synthesis of Geography’s multidisciplinary focus. This includes, but is not limited to, examples of human-environmental interaction, location theory, and transition models along with their past, present, and future impacts.

SLO 4: Display evidence of professional, career skills such as independent problem solving, exhibiting professional judgment, and dependability.

SLO 5: Conduct research through the development of a research question, identification and integration of relevant literature, select appropriate research methods, and execution of data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Content Knowledge & Skills

SLO 1: Identify patterns and processes of spatial relationships and interactions, movement, diffusion, and scale to explain their causes and significance, and to understand analytical methods to study them.

Environmental Resource Management: Geosystems, B.A.

Goal 1 - Critical Thinking & Data Analysis: Our students will use concepts from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to critically analyze and interpret scientific data.

    By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1 - Analyze and interpret scientific data to formulate an evidence-based conclusion

Outcome 1.2 - Use a variety of mathematical tools and computer software to describe scientific phenomena and answer scientific questions

Goal 2 - Communication: Our students will be able to communicate concepts from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science.

By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 2.1 - Create a well-written report or paper that summarizes scientific data and draws evidence-based conclusions

Outcome 2.2 - Create and deliver a well-constructed oral report that summarizes scientific data and draws evidence-based conclusions

Goal 3 - Content Knowledge and Skills: Our students will apply concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to the real world.

By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1 - Describe fundamental theories and concepts in Earth, Space, or Environmental Science

Outcome 3.2 - Use concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to create a model of a complex system

Outcome 3.3 - Use concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to solve a real-world problem

    Outcome 3.4 - Use scientific equipment to collect valid scientific data.  

Environmental Resource Management: Resource Administration, B.A.

Communication

SLO 3: Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills related to geographic knowledge.

Critical Thinking

SLO 2: Demonstrate abilities in critical thinking and intellectual synthesis including synthesis of Geography’s multidisciplinary focus. This includes, but is not limited to, examples of human-environmental interaction, location theory, and transition models along with their past, present, and future impacts.

SLO 4: Display evidence of professional, career skills such as independent problem solving, exhibiting professional judgment, and dependability.

SLO 5: Conduct research through the development of a research question, identification and integration of relevant literature, select appropriate research methods, and execution of data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Content Knowledge & Skills

SLO 1: Identify patterns and processes of spatial relationships and interactions, movement, diffusion, and scale to explain their causes and significance, and to understand analytical methods to study them.

​Environmental Science, B.S.

Goal 1 - Critical Thinking & Data Analysis: Our students will use concepts from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to critically analyze and interpret scientific data.

    By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1 - Analyze and interpret scientific data to formulate an evidence-based conclusion

Outcome 1.2 - Use a variety of mathematical tools and computer software to describe scientific phenomena and answer scientific questions

Goal 2 - Communication: Our students will be able to communicate concepts from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science.

By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 2.1 - Create a well-written report or paper that summarizes scientific data and draws evidence-based conclusions

Outcome 2.2 - Create and deliver a well-constructed oral report that summarizes scientific data and draws evidence-based conclusions

Goal 3 - Content Knowledge and Skills: Our students will apply concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to the real world.

By the time they graduate, our students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1 - Describe fundamental theories and concepts in Earth, Space, or Environmental Science

Outcome 3.2 - Use concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to create a model of a complex system

Outcome 3.3 - Use concepts and theories from Earth, Space, or Environmental Science to solve a real-world problem

    Outcome 3.4 - Use scientific equipment to collect valid scientific data.  

Biology, M.S.

Goals: Students will gain an advanced understanding of a sub-discipline within biology through advanced biology coursework.  Students will develop an understanding of the nature of science and learn critical thinking skills by completing a research project that advances knowledge in their subdiscipline. Students will generate data, analyze and interpret data, and present data in thesis format.  Students will improve communication skills through scientific writing and oral communication in formal settings.

Outcomes:

  1. Students will show proficiency in content chosen from the student’s area of interest in the fields of ecology, evolution, organismal biology, physiology, development, cellular biology, immunology, and/or genetics.

  2. Students will be proficient in discipline-specific research techniques, allowing the student to think critically as needed to solve problems new to science.

  3. Students will communicate effectively on the topic of their research using discipline-specific vocabulary and standard written and oral scientific communication skills.

Biotechnology, P.S.M.

Program currently suspended.

Ecosystem Management, P.S.M.

Program currently suspended.

Biology, B.S.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity(or BIOL 2052 Gen Bio: Cell Structure and Function) 4
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I (Based on ALEKS score) 4
MATH 1140 (800:046) Precalculus(Based on ALEKS score) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Spring
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function(or BIOL 2051 Gen Bio: Organismal Diversity) 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
MATH 1420 (800:060) Calculus I(Major and LAC Math) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3140 (840:140) Genetics(or BIOL 3100 Ecology, Evolution, and Nature of Science) 4
CHEM 2210 (860:120) Organic Chemistry I 3
Biology Elective (3000-level) 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Spring
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science(or BIOL 3140 Genetics) 3
CHEM 2220 (860:123) Organic Chemistry II 3
CHEM 2230 (860:121) Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 2
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
BIOL 3190 (840:190) Undergraduate Research in Biology 2
BIOL 4157/5157 (840:157g) Biostatistics 3
Biology Major Elective (3000-level) 4
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) General Physics I 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 1
Liberal Arts Core 6
Biology Major Elective (3000-level) 4
BIOL 3190 (840:190) Undergraduate Research in Biology 1
PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) General Physics II 4
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
Biology Major Elective 4000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 6
 Hours16
Spring
Biology Major Elective (3000-4000 level) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours16
 Total Hours126

Biology, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity(or BIOL 2052 Gen Bio: Cell Structure & Function) 4
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I (Based on ALEKS score) 4
MATH 1140 (800:046) Precalculus(Based on ALEKS score) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Spring
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function(or BIOL 2051 Gen Bio: Organismal Diversity) 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3140 (840:140) Genetics(or BIOL 3100 Ecology, Evolution, & Nature of Science) 4
Upper Level Chemistry Course 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Spring
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science(or BIOL 3140 Genetics) 3
Biology Elective 3000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
Biology Major Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) General Physics I(or Introduction to Geology) 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 2
 Hours15
Spring
Biology Elective 3000 or 4000 Level 3
PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) General Physics II(or Earth History) 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
Biology Major Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Biology Major Elective 4000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 5
 Hours15
Spring
Biology Major Elective 4000 Level 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Biology: Biomedical Major, B.A.  

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity(or BIOL 2052 Gen Bio: Cell Structure and Function) 4
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I (Based on ALEKS score) 4
MATH 1140 (800:046) Precalculus(Based on ALEKS Score) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Spring
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function(or BIOL 2051 Gen Bio: Organismal Diversity) 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3140 (840:140) Genetics(or BIOL 3100 Ecology, Evolution, and Nature of Science) 4
CHEM 2210 (860:120) Organic Chemistry I 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science(or BIOL 3140 Genetics) 3
CHEM 2220 (860:123) Organic Chemistry II 3
CHEM 2230 (860:121) Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Junior
Fall
Anatomy/Physiology/Cellular Elective 4
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) General Physics I 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Spring
Anatomy/Physiology/Cellular Elective 4
PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) General Physics II 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 5
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
Anatomy/Physiology/Cellular Elective 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours16
Spring
Biology Major Elective 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Biology: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, B.A. 

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity(or BIOL 2052 Gen Bio: Cell Structure & Function) 4
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I (Based on ALEKS score) 4
MATH 1140 (800:046) Precalculus (Based on ALEKS score) 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Spring
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function(or BIOL 2051 Gen Bio: Organismal Diversity) 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science(or BIOL 3140 Genetics) 3
Advanced Chemistry Course 4
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
BIOL 3140 (840:140) Genetics(or BIOL 3100 Ecology, Evolution, and the Nature of Science) 4
Biology Major Electives 3000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Junior
Fall
Biology Major Elective 3000 or 4000 Level 4
Earth Science/Physics Course 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Spring
Biology Major Elective 3000 or 4000 Level 4
Biology Major Elective 3000 or 4000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 5
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
Biology Major Elective 4000 Level 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours16
Spring
Biology Major Electives 4000 Level 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Biology Teaching, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity (or BIOL 2052 General Biology: Cell Structure and Function) 4
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I (Based on ALEKS score) 4
Science Math or Liberal Arts Core Math (Based on ALEKS score) 3-4
ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research 3
 Hours14-15
Spring
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function (or BIOL 2051 General Biology: Organismal Diversity) 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
Liberal Arts Core or Science Math, if needed 3-4
COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours17-18
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science (or BIOL 3140 Genetics) 3
EARTHSCI 1320 (870:035) Earth History 4
TEACHING 2017 Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching 1
EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) Dynamics of Human Development 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours14
Spring
BIOL 3140 (840:140) Genetics (or BIOL 3100 Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science) 4
CHEM 2040 Applied Organic and Biochemistry 4
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours14
Junior
Fall
Biology Group choice 4
TEACHING 3128 Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent 1
EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148) Learning and Motivation in Classroom Contexts 3
MEASRES 3150 (250:150) Classroom Assessment 2
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) General Physics I 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours17
Spring
Biology Group choice 4
Biology Major Elective 4
SPED 3150 (220:150) Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Classrooms 2
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours13
Senior
Fall
BIOL 4142/5142 (840:142g) Evolutionary Biology 3
Biology Group choice 4
TEACHING 3129 Secondary and Special-Area Classroom Management 1
SCI ED 3300/5300 (820:190g) Orientation to Science Teaching 4
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours15
Spring
BIOL 3197 (840:197) Undergraduate Practicum in Biology Teaching 1
BIOL 4193/5193 (840:193g) Methods for Teaching Life Science 3
SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119) Schools and American Society 3
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g) Human Relations: Awareness and Application 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
Capstone Experience 2-3
 Hours15-16
Fifth Year
Fall
TEACHING 3138 (280:138) Secondary School Teaching 12
 Hours12
 Total Hours131-134

 

Environmental Resource Management: Ecosystems, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
UNIV 1000 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I 3
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) Introduction to Geology ( or GEOG 1210 Physical Geography and GEOG 1211 Physical Geography Lab) 4
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours15
Spring
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
GEOG 3310 (970:164) Geographic Information Systems I 3
UNIV 1010 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II 3
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science 3
GEOG 4260 Environmental Resource Management 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 10
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g) Geomorphology 4
LYHS 4320 Financial Resource Management in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
HISUS 4170/5170 U.S. Environmental History 3
Major Electives 4
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Major Electives 9
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 8
University Electives 6
 Hours14
 Total Hours120

Environmental Resource Management: Environmental Compliance, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
UNIV 1000 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I 3
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) Introduction to Geology ( or GEOG 1210 Physical Geography and GEOG 1211 Physical Geography Lab) 4
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours15
Spring
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
GEOG 3310 (970:164) Geographic Information Systems I 3
UNIV 1010 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II 3
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science 3
GEOG 4260 Environmental Resource Management 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 10
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g) Geomorphology 4
LYHS 4320 Financial Resource Management in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
HISUS 4170/5170 U.S. Environmental History 3
Major Electives 4
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Major Electives 9
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 8
University Electives 6
 Hours14
 Total Hours120

Environmental Resource Management: Geosystems, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
UNIV 1000 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I 3
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) Introduction to Geology (or GEOG 1210 Physical Geography and GEOG 1211 Physical Geography Lab) 4
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours15
Spring
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
GEOG 3310 (970:164) Geographic Information Systems I 3
UNIV 1010 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II 3
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science 3
GEOG 4260 Environmental Resource Management 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 10
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g) Geomorphology 4
LYHS 4320 Financial Resource Management in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
HISUS 4170/5170 U.S. Environmental History 3
Major Electives 4
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Major Electives 9
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 8
University Electives 6
 Hours14
 Total Hours120

Environmental Resource Management: Resource Administration, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
UNIV 1000 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I ( or GEOG 1210 Physical Geography and GEOG 1211 Physical Geography Lab) 3
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) Introduction to Geology ( or GEOG 1210 Physical Geography and GEOG 1211 Physical Geography Lab) 4
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours15
Spring
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
GEOG 3310 (970:164) Geographic Information Systems I 3
UNIV 1010 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II 3
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science 3
GEOG 4260 Environmental Resource Management 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 10
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g) Geomorphology 4
LYHS 4320 Financial Resource Management in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours16
Spring
HISUS 4170/5170 U.S. Environmental History 3
Major Electives 4
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Major Electives 9
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Major Electives 8
University Electives 6
 Hours14
 Total Hours120

Environmental Science, B.S.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) Introduction to Geology 4
UNIV 1000 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I 3
Liberal Arts Core 4
 Hours15
Spring
EARTHSCI 1200 (870:021) Elements of Weather 3
MATH 1420 (800:060) Calculus I 4
UNIV 1010 First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours16
Sophomore
Fall
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
BIOL 3100 (840:100) Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science 3
Environmental Science Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Elective 3
 Hours16
Spring
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
GEOG 3310 (970:164) Geographic Information Systems I 3
Environmental Science Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
Environmental Science Electives 3
Liberat Arts Core 4
University Electives 9
 Hours16
Spring
Environmental Science Electives 8
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 6
 Hours17
Senior
Fall
Environmental Science Electives 8
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 3
 Hours14
Spring
BIOL 3190 (840:190) Undergraduate Research in Biology (or EARTHSCI 4400 Undergraduate Research in Earth and Environmental Science) 3
Environmental Science Electives 8
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 3
 Hours16
 Total Hours126
 
 
 

Biology Courses

BIOL 1012 (840:012). Life: The Natural World — 3 hrs.

Examines living organisms with an emphasis on how the natural world functions as a system and how plants and animals, including humans, interact. Declared biology majors cannot receive either university or elective credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 1013 (840:013). Life: The Natural World - Lab — 1 hr.

Activities illustrating the importance, origins, and maintenance of biodiversity with a focus on the interactions among organisms and between organisms and the environment. Declared biology majors cannot receive either university or elective credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): BIOL 1012 (840:012). (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 1014 (840:014). Life: Continuity and Change — 3 hrs.

Introduction to contemporary topics in biology. Emphasis on study of gene structure and function and applications of biology to human concerns. Declared biology majors cannot receive either university or elective credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 1015 (840:015). Life: Continuity and Change - Lab — 1 hr.

Process of science and application of biology to human concerns stressed through student activities involving basic life science concepts encompassing cell structure and function, human genetics, and disease transmission. Emphasis on assisting students in understanding role of biology in our present society. Lab, 2 periods. Declared biology majors cannot receive either university or elective credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): BIOL 1014 (840:014) or equivalent. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 1033 (840:033). Principles of Microbiology — 4 hrs.

Basic concepts and practical applications of microbiology in daily life; health and disease including basic aspects of immunology and host-microbe interactions. Designed for students majoring in areas other than the sciences. For biology majors and minors counts only for university elective credit. Sections may be offered exclusively for nurses in training. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. (Fall)

BIOL 1070. Bioscientific Terminology — 1 hr.

A study of common biological terms based on Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Students will learn to interpret and remember novel scientific words, construct new biological terminology, and use scientific dictionaries. (Variable)

BIOL 2051 (840:051). General Biology: Organismal Diversity — 4 hrs.

Study of organismic biology emphasizing evolutionary patterns and diversity of organisms and interdependency of structure and function in living systems. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051) and BIOL 2052 (840:052) cannot be taken concurrently. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 2052 (840:052). General Biology: Cell Structure and Function — 4 hrs.

Introduction to the properties and functions of biological molecules, organization of living cells, production and utilization of energy, and development of multicellular organisms. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051) and BIOL 2052 (840:052) cannot be taken concurrently. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 3100 (840:100). Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science — 3 hrs.

Unifying principles of biology: how organisms interact with each other and the environment, the genetic continuity of life, and how past history affects life. Readings and student-led discussions explore concepts in detail. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). BIOL 3100 (840:100) and BIOL 3140 (840:140) cannot be taken concurrently. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 3101 (840:101). Anatomy and Physiology I — 4 hrs.

Structure and function of organ systems of human body. For students in allied health fields or other university-approved programs. Others must have consent of department head. For Biology majors and minors, counts only for university elective credit. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070), or consent of department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3102 (840:102). Anatomy and Physiology II — 4 hrs.

Continuation of 840:101. For students in allied health fields or other university-approved programs. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): C- or better in BIOL 3101 (840:101) or BIOL 3106 (840:106). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3106 (840:106). Vertebrate Anatomy — 4 hrs.

Consideration of the origin and evolution of vertebrates and comparison of vertebrate structure and function. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Spring)

BIOL 3107. Environmental Physiology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to how animals physiologically adapt to the various unique environmental conditions in which they live. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Variable)

BIOL 3108 (840:108). Vertebrate Histology — 4 hrs.

Microscopic study of cells and tissues from various vertebrate organ systems. Integration of gross anatomy and physiology through illustrating how microscopic ultrastructure is related to organ function. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Variable)

BIOL 3112 (840:112). Invertebrate Zoology — 4 hrs.

Morphology, physiology, phylogeny, taxonomy, and ecology of the invertebrates. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Variable)

BIOL 3118. Marine Biology — 3 hrs.

Study of the diversity of life in the ocean, including marine ecology, physiology, and current issues in oceanography. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Variable)

BIOL 3120 (840:120). Plant Diversity and Evolution — 4 hrs.

Form and function in vegetative and reproductive organs in all plant divisions, from algae to flowering plants, and their importance in evolutionary thought and plant classification. Lecture, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Spring)

BIOL 3140 (840:140). Genetics — 4 hrs.

Analytical approach to classical, molecular, and population genetics. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). BIOL 3100 (840:100) and BIOL 3140 (840:140) cannot be taken concurrently. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 3147 (840:147). Cancer and Emerging Infectious Diseases — 3 hrs.

Cellular and molecular study of cancer, its epidemiology, standard and novel cancer treatments, examination of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, their causative organisms, and human immune responses to them. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Spring)

BIOL 3151 (840:151). General Microbiology — 4 hrs.

Physiology, morphology, taxonomy, immunology, and pathogenicity of microbes, with applications to medicine, agriculture, sanitation, and industry. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 3160 (840:160). Field Zoology of Vertebrates — 4 hrs.

Identification and natural history of Iowa vertebrates. Emphasis on field trips. Discussion, 2 periods; lab and field work, 6 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Spring)

BIOL 3170 (840:170). Entomology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to biology of insects. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048), or CHEM 1130 (860:070). (Variable)

BIOL 3174 (840:174). Field Biology: ___________ — 1-3 hrs.

Selected topics in field biology, emphasizing hands-on techniques for field observation, and testing of evolutionary and ecological hypotheses. Offered both on- and off-campus in flexible format. Topics and hours listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit on different topic. Prerequisite(s): vary with topic. (Variable)

BIOL 3179 (840:179). Cooperative Education — 1-6 hrs.

Up to 12 hours of ungraded credit (credit/no credit basis) may be taken as university electives. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3181 (840:181). Investigations in Life Science — 4 hrs.

Introduction to significant life science concepts and models of effective teaching related to elementary school life science. Topics include cellular structure and function, inheritance, plant systems, and human systems. Discussion and/or lab, 5 periods. Prerequisite(s): SCI ED 1200 (820:032). (Odd Falls)

BIOL 3185 (840:185). Readings in Biology — 1-3 hrs.

Independent readings in biology from selected list approved in advance. Maximum of 3 hours for biology major or minor. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3189 (840:189). Seminar — 1-2 hrs.

(Variable)

BIOL 3190 (840:190). Undergraduate Research in Biology — 1-3 hrs.

Research activities under direct supervision of Biology faculty members. Credit determined prior to registration based upon student proposal with agreement of faculty advisor. May be repeated for maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); sophomore standing; consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3191 (840:191). Senior Thesis — 1 hr.

Senior research thesis. Open only to and required for students pursuing the B.S. Biology or B.A. Biology Honors Emphasis. Prerequisite(s): consent of department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 3197 (840:197). Undergraduate Practicum in Biology Teaching — 1 hr.

Examination of teaching strategies and practical experience in laboratory teaching through observation and assistance in introductory biology laboratories. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): BIOL 4193/5193 (840:193g); consent of instructor. (Variable)

BIOL 4105/5105 (840:105g). Wildlife Ecology and Management — 4 hrs.

Applied population management of game and nongame wildlife. Lab emphasizes field techniques, population modeling, and habitat management planning. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 4108/5108. Biodiversity Conservation Policy — 3 hrs.

Review of laws and policies affecting endangered species, ecosystem management, and biodiversity conservation in the United States. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Falls)

BIOL 4114/5114 (840:114g). Comparative Animal Physiology — 4 hrs.

Physical and chemical basis of cellular/organ functions across various animal phyla. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040 or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Even Falls)

BIOL 4116/5116 (840:116g). Neurobiology — 3 hrs.

Survey of vertebrate nervous systems. Examination of several levels of organization ranging from molecules to neurons to larger systems in the brain. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040 or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4121/5121 (840:121g). Plant Biotechnology — 4 hrs.

Highlights the theory and applications of plant tissue cultures, genetic engineering (including use of plants for production of antibodies and vaccines), marker-assisted selection, and genomics. Lab component gives students practical experience with the biotechnology applications discussed in lecture. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 4122/5122 (840:122g). Plant Physiology — 4 hrs.

How plants work: uptake and use of water and materials, synthesis and transport of organic compounds, growth and development, and responses to environment. Lecture, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040 or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4127/5127 (840:127g). Bioinformatics Applications for Biology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to computer based analyses and management applications for molecular biological data. Topics include bioinformatics history, instrumentation, PC applications, resources, data bases, and discussions of genomics and proteomics applications. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Springs)

BIOL 4128/5128 (840:128g). Cell Biology — 4 hrs.

Foundation in cell structure, organization, and function, with emphasis on signal transduction, cell trafficking and cell cycle control. Lab will emphasize developing laboratory skills and improving analytical and writing abilities. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040 or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4129/5129 (840:129g). Genomics — 3 hrs.

Genome sequencing, analysis of sequence variation, sequencing for disease diagnosis, comparative genomics, personal genomics, the epigenome in disease development, analysis of gene expression. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Falls)

BIOL 4131/5131 (840:131g). Animal Behavior — 4 hrs.

Mechanisms, adaptive significance, evolution, and ecology of behavior and sociality. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Variable)

BIOL 4137/5137 (840:138g). Vertebrate Physiology — 4 hrs.

Study of functional mechanisms for cellular processes in select vertebrate organ systems. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040 or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 4142/5142 (840:142g). Evolutionary Biology — 3 hrs.

Conceptual overview of evolutionary theory, mechanisms of evolutionary process, speciation and major evolutionary events. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4144/5144 (840:144g). Virology — 4 hrs.

Introduction to virus structure, replication, genetics, pathogenicity, host interactions, detection, epidemiology, evolution, and virology methods. Health, agriculture, research and industry applications. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Springs)

BIOL 4146/5146 (840:146g). Developmental Biology of Animals — 4 hrs.

Major concepts and central questions of animal development and controlling mechanisms. Laboratory emphasis on experimental inquiry and developmental anatomy. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Fall)

BIOL 4150/5150 (840:150g). Immunology — 4 hrs.

Focus on multiple levels of human immunity, from organs/cells to molecular events. Basic immunology and relationships between immunology and various disease states. Laboratory experiences include many commonly-used immunology techniques. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Fall)

BIOL 4152/5152. Microbial Molecular Biology — 4 hrs.

Microbial gene action. Laboratory emphasizes methods used to study mechanisms of microbial gene function at the molecular level. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); CHEM 2040, or CHEM 2210 (860:120); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 4153/5153 (840:153g). Recombinant DNA Techniques — 4 hrs.

Study of techniques for analyzing and manipulating DNA and RNA, including polymerase chain reaction, genomic library construction, gene expression, and genomic analysis with computers. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Falls)

BIOL 4154/5154 (840:154g). Aquatic Ecology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to geological, physical, chemical, and biological factors that interact to determine functional characteristics of inland waters. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Variable)

BIOL 4157/5157 (840:157g). Biostatistics — 3 hrs.

Introduction to methods used to analyze and interpret quantitative biological data. Emphasis on parametric statistics; use of "R" software for data analysis and presentation. Lecture, 2 hours; lab, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1140 (800:046), or MATH 1120 (800:056) and MATH 1130 (800:044), or MATH 1420 (800:060), or equivalent; BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Fall)

BIOL 4164/5164 (840:164g). Mammalogy — 4 hrs.

Biology of mammals, including evolutionary history, zoogeography, ecology, and diversity. Laboratory emphasis on identifications, natural history, and field techniques. Lecture, 3 periods; lab and field, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Fall)

BIOL 4166/5166 (840:166g). Plant Systematics — 4 hrs.

Classification and identification of vascular plants, with emphasis on evolution of species and larger groups. Discussion, 2 periods; lab and field work, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 4167/5167 (840:167g). Conservation Biology — 3 hrs.

Biodiversity and threats to it, extinction, conservation of endangered species, protected areas, ex situ conservation, private land conservation, ecological economics. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4168/5168 (840:168g). Ecology — 4 hrs.

Principles of organismal adaptation, species interactions, and population, community, and ecosystem structure/dynamics. Lab emphasizes student-led experiments, data analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Fall)

BIOL 4172/5172 (840:172g). Developmental Plant Anatomy — 4 hrs.

Structure and function of flowering plants, with emphasis on cell and organ development. Lecture, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Even Falls)

BIOL 4176/5176. Microscopy Methods in Biology — 3 hrs.

The history, theory, and fundamental operating principles of light, stereo, and confocal microscopes. Labs will focus on the use of these microscopes, specimen preparation, and digital processing techniques of fixed and live specimens. Discussion, 1 period, laboratory, 2 periods, plus 1 period arranged. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Variable)

BIOL 4180/5180 (840:180g). Restoration Ecology — 4 hrs.

Ecological principles applied to restoration of degraded ecosystems. Lab covers hands-on techniques in regional restoration and reconstruction. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 (840:100); BIOL 3140 (840:140); junior standing. (Odd Springs)

BIOL 4193/5193 (840:193g). Methods for Teaching Life Science — 3 hrs.

Teaching approaches, instructional and assessment strategies, curricular and laboratory materials, and issues related to grades 5-12 life science and biology. Field experiences in secondary school science classrooms. Discussion, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): TEACHING 3128; EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148); MEASRES 3150 (250:150); SCI ED 3300/5300 (820:190g); SCI ED 3200; junior standing. (Spring)

BIOL 4198 (840:198). Independent Study — 1-6 hrs.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 6202 (840:202). Graduate Colloquium — 1 hr.

Weekly presentation by a student, faculty member, or visitor on biological topic. Taken each semester for four semesters for maximum of 4 hours. Discussion, 1 period. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 6215. Advanced Molecular Cloning — 3 hrs.

Student teams will experiment with, analyze and trouble shoot real world cloning projects. Techniques used may include RT-PCR, Q-PCR, DNA sequence analysis, site-directed mutagenesis and gene design. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 3 periods. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 4153/5153 (840:153g) or equivalent; consent of instructor. (Variable)

BIOL 6230 (840:230). Special Problems in Biology — 1-6 hrs.

Credit determined at registration. (Problems in biology other than those for theses or in regular curricular offerings.) May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 6292 (840:292) recommended; consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 6240 (840:240). Advanced Cellular and Molecular Biology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics concerning understanding of function of living organisms at molecular and cellular level: regulatory mechanisms, recombinant DNA techniques, gene expression, and genetics of diseases. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods. May be repeated on different topic. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Odd Springs)

BIOL 6250 (840:250). Advanced Physiology and Development — 3 hrs.

Selected topics concerning understanding of organ, organ system, and organism structure and function: immune system, cellular signaling mechanisms, photosynthesis, and cell motility and development. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods. May be repeated on different topic. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Odd Falls)

BIOL 6260 (840:260). Advanced Ecology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics of ecology, concerning the understanding of relationships among organisms, and between organisms and their environments (natural or artificial): physiological ecology, conservation biology, and aquatic ecology. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods. May be repeated on different topic. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Even Springs)

BIOL 6270 (840:270). Advanced Systematics and Evolutionary Biology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics concerning understanding of systematic and evolutionary relationships among organisms and evolutionary biology: evolutionary theory, systematics, and origin of life. Lecture/discussion, 3 periods. May be repeated on different topic. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Even Falls)

BIOL 6280 (840:280). Advanced Analytical Techniques — 2 hrs.

Discussion of advanced modern methods of biological data collection and analysis, including the use of computer algorithms to help understand experimental results obtained from laboratory or field. Discussion and/or lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

BIOL 6289 (840:289). Seminar — 1 hr.

May be repeated for credit. (Variable)

BIOL 6292 (840:292). Research Methods in Biology — 1 hr.

Introduction to research methods in biology. Emphasis on literature review, proposal preparation, and manuscript style. Discussion, 1 period. (Fall and Spring)

BIOL 6297 (840:297). Practicum — 2 hrs.

May be repeated. (Variable)

BIOL 6299 (840:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BIOL 629R (840:29R). Directed Research.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

Iowa Lakeside Laboratory Courses

IA LL 2010 (890:010). Earth, Air and Sky — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the essentials of earth science (astronomy, meteorology, geology, and paleontology). (Summer)

IA LL 2019 (890:019). Soils and Environmental Quality — 4 hrs.

Role of soils in the environment; relationship between soil quality and plant growth. Field studies on soil identification, degradation and restoration as well as identifying tools useful in effective land and water stewardship. (Summer)

IA LL 2030 (890:030). Natural History Workshop — 1-2 hrs.

Offered as demand warrants. Five day-long, non-technical introductions to a specific aspect of the natural history of the upper Midwest or techniques for studying natural history. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Variable)
A. Amphibians and Reptiles
B. Birds and Birding
C. Nature Photography
D. Mushrooms and Other Fungi
E. Iowa's Trees and Forests
F. Fish Biology
G. Prairies
I. Common Insects
J. Aquatic Plants
K. Life in Rivers
L. Life in Lakes
M. Mosses and Liverworts
N. Natural History of Iowa Great Lakes Region
P. Field Archaeology
Q. Common Algae
S. Scuba Diving
T. Astronomy
U. Sketching Nature (Variable)

IA LL 2031. Ecology — 4 hrs.

Introduction to the evolutionary and basic principles of ecology at the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Integrates lectures and field studies to examine the distribution and abundance of plans and animals in native ecosystems. (Summer)

IA LL 2034. Topics in Ecology and Sustainability — 1-4 hrs.

Scientific introduction to ecology and evolution of important groups of organisms. Topics include: algae to vertebrates, different ecological phenomena (e.g., fire and climate change), varying landforms, different ecosystems (e.g., prairies and aquatic systems); emphasis on sustainability with introduction to concepts, issues, and practices; ability to communicate environmental information through a variety of means. May be repeated. (Summer)

IA LL 2040 (890:040). Field Archaeology — 4 hrs.

Nature of cultural and environmental evidence in archaeology and how they are used to model past human behavior and land use; emphasis on Iowa prehistory; basic reconnaissance surveying and excavation techniques. (Summer)

IA LL 2043 (890:043). Illustrating Nature-Sketching — 2 hrs.

Sketching plants, animals, and terrain. Visual communication, development of a personal style, and integration of typographic and visual elements on a page will be emphasized. (Summer)

IA LL 2044 (890:044). Illustrating Nature - Photography — 2 hrs.

Beginning to intermediate technical and compositional aspects of color photography of natural areas and their plants and animals. (Summer)

IA LL 2045 (890:050). Undergraduate Internships — 1-5 hrs.

Placement with county conservation boards, camps, parks, etc., for experience as interpreters, rangers, and technicians. (Summer)

IA LL 3100/5100 (890:100g). Techniques For Biology Teaching — 1-2 hrs.

Development and implementation of laboratory exercises suitable for inclusion in elementary, middle, high school, and community college biology and environmental courses. Exercises will be built around common organisms and ecosystems in Iowa. Field trips. A. (Summer)

IA LL 3102/5102 (890:102g). Plant-Animal Interactions — 4 hrs.

Introduction to ecology and co-evolution of plants and animals. Emphasis on dispersal, pollination, and plant-herbivore interactions; field and laboratory work, reading, and discussion. Prerequisite(s): one course in the biological sciences; junior standing. (Variable)

IA LL 3103/5103 (890:103g). Aquatic Ecology — 4 hrs.

Analysis of aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis on basic ecological principles; ecological theories tested in the field, and identification of common plants and animals. Prerequisite(s): courses in ecology, chemistry, and physics or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3105/5105 (890:105g). Plant Taxonomy — 4 hrs.

Principles of classification and evolution of vascular plants; taxonomic tools and collection techniques; use of keys. Field and laboratory studies emphasizing identification of local flowering plants and recognition of major plant families. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3107/5107. Field Parasitology — 4 hrs.

Ecology and life history of parasites, protozoans, helminths, arthropods; field and laboratory investigations including preparation, identification, and morphology of representative types and stages; general and comparative concepts of parasitology. (Variable)

IA LL 3109/5109. Ecology and Systematics of Algae — 4 hrs.

Structure and taxonomy of freshwater algae based on field-collected material. Emphasis on genus-level identifications, habitats; visited locations include lakes, fens, streams, and rivers; algal ecology. (Summer)

IA LL 3111/5111 (890:111g). Summer Writing Festival at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory — 1 hr.

One-week workshop designed for young adult to adult writers of all levels, helps participants apply their imagination to their life experiences and become more effective writers. Writing exercises invite imaginative leaps and thoughtful reflections and humor, as well as seriousness. Participants work in various forms of expression, including the personal essay, poetry, and short fiction. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3121/5121 (890:121g). Plant Ecology — 4 hrs.

Principles of plant population, community, and ecosystem ecology illustrated through studies of native vegetation in local prairies, wetlands, and forests. Group or individual projects. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3122/5122 (890:122g). Prairie Ecology — 4 hrs.

Basic patterns and underlying physical and biotic causes of both regional and local distributions of plants and animals of North American prairies; field and laboratory analyses and projects. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3124/5124 (890:124g). Wetland Ecology — 4 hrs.

Ecology, classification, creation, restoration, and management of wetlands. Field studies examine the composition, structure, and functions of local natural wetlands and restored prairie pothole wetlands. Individual or group projects. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3126/5126 (890:126g). Ornithology — 2-4 hrs.

The biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with emphasis on field studies of local avifauna. Group projects stress techniques of population analysis and methodology for population studies. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3127/5127 (890:127g). Introduction to Insect Ecology — 4 hrs.

Field and laboratory study of insects, their diversity, and life history. Emphasis on ecology and behavior. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

IA LL 3128/5128 (890:128g). Fish Ecology — 2-4 hrs.

Basic principles of fish interaction with the biotic and abiotic environment. Field methods, taxonomy, and biology of fish with emphasis on the fish fauna of northwestern Iowa. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3132 (890:132). Ecology — 4 hrs.

Introduction to the evolutionary and basic principles of ecology at the organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Integrates lectures and field studies to examine the distribution and abundance of plants and animals in native ecosystems. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or consent of instructor. (Summer)

IA LL 3134/5134 (890:134g). Animals and their Ecosystems — 4 hrs.

Focus on the vertebrate and invertebrate animals of the Midwest. Animals are observed in nature either through passive observational techniques or active trapping exercises. Once identified, animals are placed in their proper taxonomic position (i.e., put onto the "Tree of Life"). They also are put into ecological perspective, including habitat preferences (i.e., wetland, lake prairie, forest, river, edge), trophic position, and activity patterns. Conservation status is discussed and in many cases emphasized. Prerequisite(s): an introductory biology course; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3135/5135 (890:135g). Aquatic Toxicology and Wetland Dynamics in Freshwater Systems — 2 hrs.

Fundamental knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts related to the physio-chemical and biological environment; problems and issues (global, national, regional, and local) of freshwater systems; how wetland restoration is used to ameliorate problems; basic tools used to assess aquatic toxicological problems. Prerequisite(s): one year of biology and one year of chemistry; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3140/5140 (890:140g). Water Policy & Politics — 1 hr.

Historical, legal, economic, cultural, and political dimensions of water resources; public perception and enjoyment of this abundant and important natural resource; how public policy developed; private rights; differences between the previous appropriation system in the western U.S. and Eastern riparian rights law; public rights regarding water for navigation, recreation, and environmental protection; water-related institutions such as suppliers of municipal water and irrigation water; interbasin transport of water. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3142/5142 (890:142g). Watershed Hydrology and Surficial Processes — 4 hrs.

Effects of geomorphology, soils, and land use on transport of water and materials (nutrients and contaminants) in watersheds. Fieldwork will emphasize investigations of the Iowa Great Lakes watershed. Prerequisite(s): four courses in the physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3160/5160 (890:160g). Restoration Ecology — 4 hrs.

Ecological principles for the restoration of native ecosystems; establishment (site preparation, selection of seed mixes, and planting techniques) and management (fire, mowing, and weed control) of native vegetation; evaluation of restorations. Emphasis on the restoration of prairie and wetland vegetation. Prerequisite(s): a course in ecology; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3163 (890:163). Conservation Biology — 4 hrs.

Population- and community-level examination of factors influencing the viability of plant and animal populations from both demographic and genetic perspectives; assessment of biodiversity; and design and management of preserves. Prerequisite(s): general biology. (Summer)

IA LL 3165/5165 (890:165g). Behavioral Ecology — 4 hrs.

Animal coloniality, courtship, territoriality, predator defense, habitat selection, foraging, mating systems, and parental care will be examined in the field in order to evaluate various ecological and evolutionary theories of animal behavior. Prerequisite(s): two courses in the biological sciences; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 3166/5166. Amphibians & Reptiles — 2-4 hrs.

Ecology, behavior, and conservation biology of amphibians and reptiles. Emphasis on their anatomy and morphology, temperature and water regulation, locomotion, life history, reproduction, population and community ecology, and conservation. (Summer)

IA LL 3175/5175 (890:175g). Soil Formation & Landscape Relationships — 2-4 hrs.

Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Prerequisite(s): introductory soils course or IA LL 3142/5142 (890:142g); junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 4178/5178 (890:178g). Analysis of Environmental Data — 2 hrs.

Provides students with training in the theory and application of a range of statistical techniques useful for the analysis of ecological and paleoecological data. Topics include data management, exploratory data analysis, regression analysis, direct and indirect ordination methods, classification techniques, transfer functions and the analysis of temporal data. Lectures and practical classes with hands-on-training. Directed towards advanced undergraduate, graduate, and working professionals in ecology and paleoecology. Prerequisite(s): an undergraduate course in statistics, understanding of basic concepts such as correlation and regression, and familiarity with PC-based software for data analysis; junior standing. (Summer)

IA LL 4193 (890:193). Undergraduate Research — 1-4 hrs.

Prerequisite(s): junior standing; consent of instructor. (Variable)

IA LL 4198 (890:198). Undergraduate Independent Study — 1-4 hrs.

Prerequisite(s): junior standing; consent of instructor. (Variable)

IA LL 6210 (890:210). Global Climate Change: Causes, Connections and Cures — 2 hrs.

Underlying causes of global climate change, both natural and human; web of interrelated links affecting the physical and living world, including human society; cause-and-effect relationships and interventions that may reduce negative consequences; for teachers of grades 7-12 and students enrolled in teacher education programs for those grades. Prerequisite(s): bachelor's degree. (Summer)

IA LL 6215 (890:215). Field Mycology — 4 hrs.

Identification and classification of the common fungi; techniques for identification, preservation, and culture practiced with members of the various fungi groups. (Summer)

IA LL 6217 (890:217). Ecology and Systematics of Diatoms — 4 hrs.

Field and laboratory study of freshwater diatoms; techniques in collection, preparation, and identification of diatom samples; study of environmental factors affecting growth, distribution, and taxonomic characters; project design and execution, including construction of reference and voucher collections and data organization and analysis. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of introductory biology or geology, and consent of instructor. (Summer)

IA LL 6225 (890:225). Physical Limnology — 2-4 hrs.

Mechanisms of physical transport of heat and contaminants in lakes; temperature cycle and stratification; disturbances to seasonal temperature structure, including the diurnal mixed layer, waves, upwelling, differential heating; turbulence, mixing, transport; field measurements of physical processes, computer models of transport. (Summer)

IA LL 6234. Topics in Ecology and Sustainability — 1-4 hrs.

Scientific introduction to ecology and evolution of important groups of organisms. Topics include: algae to vertebrates, different ecological phenomena (e.g., fire and climate change), varying landforms, different ecosystems (e.g., prairies and aquatic systems); emphasis on sustainability with introduction to concepts, issues, and practices; ability to communicate environmental information through a variety of means. May be repeated. (Summer)

IA LL 6240 (890:240). Natural History Workshop — 1-3 hrs.

Offered as demand warrants. Graduate workshop on some aspect of the natural history of the Upper Midwest or on techniques for studying natural history. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

IA LL 6263. Conservation Biology — 4 hrs.

Population- and community-level examination of factors influencing the viability of plant and animal populations from both demographic and genetic perspectives; assessment of biodiversity; and design and management of preserves. (Summer)

IA LL 6291 (890:291). Graduate Internships — 1-5 hrs.

Placement with county conservation boards, camps, parks, schools, etc., for experience as interpreters, rangers, technicians, and teachers. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)