2016-17 Academic Catalog
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Department of Physics

(College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences)

www.physics.uni.edu

The Department of Physics offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs.  Specific requirements for these programs are listed within this Department of Physics section in the following order:

Undergraduate Major (B.S.)

  • Physics

Undergraduate Major (B.A.)

  • Physics-Teaching

Minors

  • Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
  • Physics

Program Certificate

  • Physics Teaching

The Department of Physics offers major programs in two baccalaureate areas: the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts. The B.S. Physics major is recommended for students who wish to prepare for graduate study in physics, engineering, or other sciences such as geophysics, astronomy, biophysics, or medical physics. The B.A. Physics-Teaching program provides students with the best qualification to teach physics in high school.

Bachelor of Science Degree Program

Emphasis-B.S. Physics Major Honors Research

Emphasis-Honors Research

Students who complete a sustained research project in physics may be invited to do Honors Research. Students must first complete 4 credit hours of PHYSICS 3000 (880:180) Undergraduate Research in Physics and then 1 credit hour of PHYSICS 4990 Senior Thesis.

Physics Major

The B.S. Physics major requires a minimum of 126 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 126 hours. 

Note: To graduate with a B.S. degree in Physics, a student must earn an overall grade point average of at least 2.50 in all courses applied toward the major.

Required
Mathematics:
MATH 1420 (800:060)Calculus I4
MATH 1421 (800:061)Calculus II4
MATH 2422 (800:062)Calculus III4
Physics:
PHYSICS 1100First-Year Projects in Physics1
PHYSICS 1701 (880:130)Physics I for Science and Engineering4
PHYSICS 1702 (880:131)Physics II for Science and Engineering4
PHYSICS 2300 (880:132)Physics III: Theory and Simulation3
PHYSICS 2700Mathematical Methods of Physics3
PHYSICS 3000 (880:180)Undergraduate Research in Physics2
or PHYSICS 3500 (880:184) Internship in Applied Physics
PHYSICS 3700 (880:187)Physics Seminar1
PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g)Modern Physics4
PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g)Modern Physics Laboratory2
PHYSICS 4300/5300 (880:152g)Introduction to Electronics4
PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g)Classical Mechanics4
PHYSICS 4860/5860 (880:150g)Computational Physics3
PHYSICS 4900/5900 (880:136g)Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics4
Electives
Physics, Natural Science, or Math Electives *8
Total Hours59

 

*

Students have the option to design an area of professional concentration by the appropriate choice of elective courses in Physics (or another Natural Science), or Mathematics.  Electives must be mathematics or science courses that count toward a major of the department offering the course. Electives should be selected with the advice of an academic adviser in Physics.


Bachelor of Arts Degree Program

Emphasis-B.A. Physics Major-Teaching Honors Research

Emphasis-Honors Research

Students who complete a sustained research project in physics education may be invited to do Honors Research. Students must first complete 4 credit hours of PHYSICS 3000 (880:180) Undergraduate Research in Physics and then 1 credit hour of PHYSICS 4990 Senior Thesis.

Physics Major-Teaching

The B.A. Physics major in teaching requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Required
Mathematics:
MATH 1420 (800:060)Calculus I4
MATH 1421 (800:061)Calculus II4
Science and Science Education:
SCI ED 3300/5300 (820:190g)Orientation to Science Teaching3
SCI ED 4700/5700 (820:193g)Methods for Teaching Physical Science3
SCI ED 3200 (820:196)Current Technologies in Science Teaching2
Physics:
PHYSICS 1100First-Year Projects in Physics1
PHYSICS 1701 (880:130)Physics I for Science and Engineering4
PHYSICS 1702 (880:131)Physics II for Science and Engineering4
PHYSICS 2300 (880:132)Physics III: Theory and Simulation3
PHYSICS 4080/5080Resources for Teaching Physics2
PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g)Modern Physics4
PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g)Modern Physics Laboratory2
Electives
Physics: all 3000+ level courses6
Mathematics or non-physics science courses from the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences *4
Total Hours46

 

*

Excluding all 820:xxx and mathematics below MATH 1420 (800:060).

 

It is recommended that sufficient work including current curricula should be taken for licensure approval in a second area. Common teaching combinations are physics-chemistry or physics-mathematics.

Completion of this major will satisfy the requirements of the Iowa Department of Education for licensure.

Minors

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Minor

Required
Chemistry and Biochemistry:5-8
Select one of the following:
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
General Chemistry I-II
Physics:
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054)General Physics I4
or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) Physics I for Science and Engineering
PHYSICS 1512 (880:056)General Physics II4
or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131) Physics II for Science and Engineering
PHYSICS 4200/5200 (880:144g)Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology3
or CHEM 4200/5200 (860:144g) Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
PHYSICS 4210/5210 (880:148g)Intermediate Nanoscience and Nanotechnology3
or CHEM 4210/5210 (860:148g) Intermediate Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Total Hours19-22

Physics Minor

Required
Physics:
Select one of the following:8
General Physics I
and General Physics II (required)
Physics I for Science and Engineering
and Physics II for Science and Engineering (required)
Electives:12
Physics:
3000-level electives in Physics, with no more than 3 hours earned in the following: *
Undergraduate Research in Physics (and/or)
Laboratory Projects
Total Hours20
*

See course descriptions to reference 4-digit numbers associated with these 3000-level courses.

Program Certificate

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following certificates, contact the Department of Physics or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Physics Teaching Certificate

Completion of the certificate for the following majors meets the requirements of the State of Iowa Grades 5-12 Physics Teaching Endorsement.

Required:
Physics:
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054)General Physics I4
or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) Physics I for Science and Engineering
PHYSICS 1512 (880:056)General Physics II4
or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131) Physics II for Science and Engineering
PHYSICS 4080/5080Resources for Teaching Physics2
Science Education:
SCI ED 3300/5300 (820:190g)Orientation to Science Teaching3
Electives chosen from the following:3-5
Elective hours vary by major program. Mathematics Teaching majors and Chemistry Teaching majors must select three hours from the following; other secondary science teaching majors including All Science Teaching, Middle/Junior High School Science Teaching, Biology Teaching, and Earth Science Teaching must select five hours from the following:
First-Year Projects in Physics
Projects in Basic Robotics and Sensors
Physics III: Theory and Simulation
Undergraduate Research in Physics *
Optical Science
Modern Physics
Modern Physics Laboratory
Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Intermediate Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Project Lead The Way: Digital Electronics
Introduction to Electronics
Total Hours16-18
*

 A maximum of 2 hours are allowed.

 

 

Physics, B.S.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
MATH 1420 (800:060) Calculus I 4
PHYSICS 1100 First-Year Projects in Physics 1
PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) Physics I for Science and Engineering 4
ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research 3
MUSIC 1100 (520:010) Soundscapes: Music in Culture 3
 Hours15
Spring
MATH 1421 (800:061) Calculus II 4
PHYSICS 1702 (880:131) Physics II for Science and Engineering 4
COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication 3
HUM 1021 (680:021) Humanities I: The Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Worlds 3
University Elective 3
 Hours17
Sophomore
Fall
MATH 2422 (800:062) Calculus III 4
PHYSICS 2300 (880:132) Physics III: Theory and Simulation 3
PHYSICS 4300/5300 (880:152g) Introduction to Electronics 4
HUM 1022 (680:022) Humanities II: The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment 3
University Elective 3
 Hours17
Spring
PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g) Modern Physics 4
PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g) Modern Physics Laboratory 2
PHYSICS 2700 Mathematical Methods of Physics 3
GEOG 1120 (970:010) Human Geography 3
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
PHYSICS 3000 (880:180) Undergraduate Research in Physics 2
PHYSICS 3700 (880:187) Physics Seminar 1
PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g) Classical Mechanics 4
HUM 3125 (680:125) India 3
HPELS 1020 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lecture 1
HPELS 1030 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lab 1
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
PHYSICS 4700/5700 (880:167g) Electrodynamics 4
PHYSICS 4860/5860 (880:150g) Computational Physics 3
PHIL 1020 (650:021) Philosophy: The Art of Thinking 3
University Electives 6
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
PHYSICS 4900/5900 (880:136g) Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 4
POL INTL 1024 (943:024) International Relations 3
BIOL 1012 (840:012) Life: The Natural World 3
University Electives 6
 Hours16
Spring
PHYSICS 4800/5800 (880:172g) Quantum Mechanics 4
CAP 3140 (CAP:140) Environment, Technology, and Society 2
ECON 1031 (920:024) Introduction to Economics 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
 Total Hours126
*

 Note: To graduate with a B.S. degree in Physics, a student must earn an overall grade point average of at least 2.50 in all courses applied toward the major.

 

 

Physics Teaching, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research 3
HUM 1021 (680:021) Humanities I: The Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Worlds 3
MATH 1420 (800:060) Calculus I 4
PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) Physics I for Science and Engineering 4
PHYSICS 1100 First-Year Projects in Physics 1
 Hours15
Spring
COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication 3
BIOL 1012 (840:012) Life: The Natural World 3
HPELS 1020 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lecture 1
HPELS 1030 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lab 1
MATH 1421 (800:061) Calculus II 4
PHYSICS 1702 (880:131) Physics II for Science and Engineering 4
 Hours16
Sophomore
Fall
University Electives 4
TEACHING 2017 Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching 1
HUM 1022 (680:022) Humanities II: The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment 3
GEOG 1120 (970:010) Human Geography 3
EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) Dynamics of Human Development 3
PHYSICS 2300 (880:132) Physics III: Theory and Simulation 3
 Hours17
Spring
TEACHING 3128 Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent 1
EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148) Learning and Motivation in Classroom Contexts 3
MEASRES 3150 (250:150) Classroom Assessment 2
ARTHIST 1004 (600:004) Visual Perceptions 3
PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g) Modern Physics 4
PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g) Modern Physics Laboratory 2
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
University Electives 3
SCI ED 3200 (820:196) Current Technologies in Science Teaching 2
SCI ED 3300/5300 (820:190g) Orientation to Science Teaching 3
SPED 3150 (220:150) Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Classrooms 2
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g) Human Relations: Awareness and Application 3
PHYSICS 4050/5050 (880:140g) Optical Science 3
 Hours16
Spring
PHYSICS 4290/5290 Project Lead The Way: Digital Electronics 3
PHYSICS 4080/5080 Resources for Teaching Physics 2
CAP 3140 (CAP:140) Environment, Technology, and Society 2
ECON 1031 (920:024) Introduction to Economics 3
University Electives 3
SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119) Schools and American Society 3
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
SCI ED 4700/5700 (820:193g) Methods for Teaching Physical Science 3
EARTHSCI 1100 (870:010) Astronomy 4
PHIL 1020 (650:021) Philosophy: The Art of Thinking 3
HUM 3124 (680:124) China 3
 Hours13
Spring
TEACHING 3138 (280:138) Secondary School Teaching 12
 Hours12
 Total Hours120

 

Courses

PHYSICS 1000 (880:012). Physics in Everyday Life — 3 hrs.

Basic laws and concepts of physics introduced and demonstrated through operation of everyday devices and systems. Emphasis on understanding physical principles behind working of modern technologies and interplay between science and technology. Students may not earn credit in both PHYSICS 1400 (880:011) and PHYSICS 1000 (880:012). Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 1100. First-Year Projects in Physics — 1 hr.

An introduction to the basic elements of physics research and applications. Students will complete a series of projects designed to integrate theory, measurement and computation to create instruments and devices that interact with the physical world. In doing so, students will learn how to create and control electro-mechanical devices and gain experience in techniques used in both industry and research. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): PHYSICS 1701 (880:130), Physics I for Science and Engineering, or the consent of the department head. (Fall)

PHYSICS 1400 (880:011). Conceptual Physics — 4 hrs.

Energy; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; light and color; and atomic and nuclear structure of matter. Emphasis on observation, interpretation, and conceptual understanding of physical phenomena. Discussion, 3 periods; lab, 2 periods. Students may not earn credit in both PHYSICS 1400 (880:011) and PHYSICS 1000 (880:012). Prerequisite(s): student must have satisfied university entrance requirements in English and Mathematics. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 1511 (880:054). General Physics I — 4 hrs.

Algebra-based introductory course covering Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, and thermal physics. Emphasis on conceptual understanding of physical principles through group investigations and lab activities. Discussion/lab, 5 periods. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1130 (800:044) or MATH 1140 (800:046) or MATH 1150 (800:048) or MATH 1420 (800:060) or equivalent, or a satisfactory ALEKS score. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 1512 (880:056). General Physics II — 4 hrs.

Algebra-based introductory course covering electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Emphasis on conceptual understanding of physical principles through group investigations and lab activities. Discussion/lab, 5 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130). (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 1701 (880:130). Physics I for Science and Engineering — 4 hrs.

Calculus-based introductory course covering Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, and thermal physics. Lab activities. Discussion/lab, 5 periods. Prerequisite(s): one year of high school physics or equivalent. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): MATH 1420 (800:060). (Fall)

PHYSICS 1702 (880:131). Physics II for Science and Engineering — 4 hrs.

Calculus-based introductory course covering electricity, magnetism, and optics. Lab activities. Discussion/lab, 5 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) (minimum grade of B) or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130). Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): MATH 1421 (800:061). (Spring)

PHYSICS 1800 (880:080). Projects in Basic Robotics and Sensors — 1 hr.

Assembly of a mini-sumo robot, with motor, sensors and microprocessor. Implement line following. Explore modifications to the sumo hardware and software that will permit successful participation in a sumo robotics competition at the end of the course. Lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) and PHYSICS 1512 (880:056), or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) and PHYSICS 1702 (880:131), or MATH 1140 (800:046) and TECH 1037 (330:037), or CS 1410 (810:041) or CS 1510 (810:051). (Spring)

PHYSICS 2300 (880:132). Physics III: Theory and Simulation — 3 hrs.

Calculus-based course covering the more advanced topics in introductory physics. Emphasis on developing analytical and computational skills needed to study physics at a more advanced level. Topics include Newtonian mechanics and applications, Maxwell's equations and applications. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1702 (880:131). (Fall)

PHYSICS 2700. Mathematical Methods of Physics — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the mathematical methods used in upper-level Physics courses, illustrated with applications from all areas of Physics. Applications will illustrate electrodynamics, thermodynamics, classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1420 (800:060); MATH 1421 (800:061); MATH 2422 (800:062); PHYSICS 1701 (880:130); PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); PHYSICS 2300 (880:132). (Spring)

PHYSICS 3000 (880:180). Undergraduate Research in Physics — 1-6 hrs.

Research activities under direct supervision of sponsoring staff members or at a national laboratory. Should normally be taken after the first year of the major. Successful completion of the research experience requires both a written and oral report. Prerequisite(s): minimum overall 2.50 GPA; consent of department. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 3179 (880:179). Cooperative Education.

Applied physics internship under PHYSICS 3179 (880:179) should be taken during the junior or senior year. If unable to do so, the internship may be done under PHYSICS 3500 (880:184) with consent of department. Successful completion of either PHYSICS 3179 (880:179) or PHYSICS 3500 (880:184) requires both a written and an oral report. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 3500 (880:184). Internship in Applied Physics — 1-3 hrs.

Departmentally approved work in applied physics (at an industrial, medical, or government laboratory) followed by oral and written reports given on completed work. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): minimum overall 2.50 GPA; consent of department. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 3700 (880:187). Physics Seminar — 1 hr.

Seminar course covering aspects important for life after graduation. Participation in physics colloquia; oral report on research topic or internship, drafting resume/CV, interview, perform job and graduate school search. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g). (Fall)

PHYSICS 4050/5050 (880:140g). Optical Science — 3 hrs.

An introduction to optics and applied optics. Topics include: geometric optics, wave optics, quantum optics, and introductions to lasers and optical spectroscopy. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); junior standing or consent of department head. (Fall)

PHYSICS 4080/5080. Resources for Teaching Physics — 2 hrs.

A physics course that focuses on topics recommended for high school physics programs, with an emphasis on various physics education resources in the context of science education initiatives. This course is designed for both current science teachers and science education undergraduates. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130); PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); junior standing. (Spring)

PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g). Modern Physics — 4 hrs.

Special relativity; quantum phenomena; wave-particle duality; atomic and nuclear structure; properties of solids, interaction of radiation with matter; and elementary particles. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); junior standing. (Spring)

PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g). Modern Physics Laboratory — 2 hrs.

Experiments on interactions of photons and electrons; mass and charge of electrons; atomic spectroscopy; nuclear detection and spectroscopy; spin resonance; and properties of solids. Requires detailed lab reports, including error analysis. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g). (Spring)

PHYSICS 4200/5200 (880:144g). Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to nanoscale materials and processes; types of materials; chemical bonding and nanoscale interactions; nanoscale microscopy and spectroscopic methods of investigation. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1110 (860:044) and CHEM 1120 (860:048) (or CHEM 1130 (860:070)); PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130); PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); junior standing. (Same as CHEM 4200/5200 (860:144g)) (Fall)

PHYSICS 4210/5210 (880:148g). Intermediate Nanoscience and Nanotechnology — 3 hrs.

Study of nanoscale materials and processes, with emphasis on nanoscale microscopy and other experimental methods of investigation and control on the nanoscale. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 4200/5200 (860:144g)/PHYSICS 4200/5200 (880:144g); junior standing. (Same as CHEM 4210/5210 (860:148g)) (Odd Springs)

PHYSICS 4290/5290. Project Lead The Way: Digital Electronics — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the theory and applications of analog and digital electronics utilizing the Digital Electronics curriculum from the nationally certified Project Lead The Way (PLTW) curriculum. Especially intended for science and technology K-12 education majors to become certified PLTW teachers of this course. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) or PHYSICS 1400 (880:011) or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130); junior standing. (Same as TECH 4290/5290) (Spring)

PHYSICS 4300/5300 (880:152g). Introduction to Electronics — 4 hrs.

Introduction to DC and AC circuits; electrical measurements, circuit theory and circuit simulation; analog and digital circuits; energy generation and efficiency. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 4 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1512 (880:056) or PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); MATH 1421 (800:061); junior standing. (Fall)

PHYSICS 4310/5310 (880:154g). Physical Computing — 4 hrs.

Introduction to computer interfacing, instrument control, and data acquisition. Utilization of industry standard software and microcontrollers to acquire and process data, process signals, and perform feedback control of physical systems. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) and PHYSICS 1512 (880:056), or PHYSICS 1701 (880:130) and PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); junior standing. (Odd Springs)

PHYSICS 4450/5450 (880:185g). Laboratory Projects — 1-3 hrs.

Experimental activities to meet individual needs and interests not normally included in other courses. Maximum of 3 hours may be applied to a physics major or minor. Prerequisite(s): junior standing; consent of department. (Fall and Spring)

PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g). Classical Mechanics — 4 hrs.

Vectors and kinematics; force and motion; work and energy; Lagrange's equations; gravity; oscillations; rigid-body motion; and accelerated reference frames. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1420 (800:060); MATH 1421 (800:061); PHYSICS 1701 (880:130); PHYSICS 1702 (880:131); PHYSICS 2300 (880:132); PHYSICS 2700; junior standing. Corequisite(s): MATH 2422 (800:062). (Fall)

PHYSICS 4700/5700 (880:167g). Electrodynamics — 4 hrs.

Vector calculus. Electrostatic fields and dielectrics; magnetic fields, magnetic forces, and magnetic materials; Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2422 (800:062); PHYSICS 2300 (880:132); PHYSICS 2700; PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g); junior standing. (Odd Springs)

PHYSICS 4750/5750 (880:174g). Physics of Modern Materials — 3 hrs.

Structural, thermal, and electronic properties of materials; applications to modern devices. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g); PHYSICS 4110/5110 (880:138g); junior standing. (Odd Falls)

PHYSICS 4800/5800 (880:172g). Quantum Mechanics — 4 hrs.

Solution of Schrodinger equation for several systems: spin and angular momentum; identical particles; perturbation theory; WKB approximation; and scattering. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 2700; PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g); PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g); junior standing. (Even Springs)

PHYSICS 4860/5860 (880:150g). Computational Physics — 3 hrs.

Computer simulations and numerical solutions of behaviors of important physical systems, emphasizing those that are very difficult or impossible to analyze by traditional means, for example, nonlinear oscillators or phase transitions in the Ising Model. Discussion, 2 periods; lab, 2 periods. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 2300 (880:132); PHYSICS 2700; PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g); PHYSICS 4600/5600 (880:166g); junior standing. (Spring)

PHYSICS 4900/5900 (880:136g). Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics — 4 hrs.

General principles of classical thermodynamics and applications (e.g., to first-order phase transitions); general principles of statistical mechanics and applications (e.g., to the classical ideal gas). Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 2300 (880:132); PHYSICS 2700; PHYSICS 4100/5100 (880:137g); junior standing. (Fall)

PHYSICS 4950/5950 (880:189g). Readings in Physics — 1-3 hrs.

Readings/problems in areas of physics (or related interdisciplinary areas) not normally covered in other courses. Maximum of 3 hours may be applied to a physics major or minor. Prerequisite(s): junior standing; consent of department. (Variable)

PHYSICS 4990. Senior Thesis — 1 hr.

Senior Thesis. Open only to students pursuing the B.S. Physics Honors Research Emphasis or the B.A. Physics-Teaching Honors Research Emphasis. Prerequisite(s): consent of the department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

PHYSICS 6100 (880:205). Modeling and Simulation of Physical Systems — 3 hrs.

Computer simulation and visualization of physical systems. Students will code, debug, and run basic simulations in C++ as well as more sophisticated simulations with other tools, including parallel computing. Prerequisite(s): CS 1160 (810:036) and PHYSICS 4860/5860 (880:150g), or MATH 3440/5440 (800:176g) and CS 1160 (810:036), or consent of instructor. (Fall)

PHYSICS 6299 (880:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

PHYSICS 6300 (880:220). Computer Interfacing and Signal Processing — 3 hrs.

Introduction to computer interfacing, instrument control, and data acquisition. Discussion of digital signal processing and utilization of industry-standard software platforms in laboratory activities. Prerequisite(s): PHYSICS 2300 (880:132); PHYSICS 4300/5300 (880:152g). (Variable)

PHYSICS 6500 (880:250). Special Problems in Physics — 1-6 hrs.

Credit determined at registration. Problems selected according to needs of students. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)