2019-20 Academic Catalog
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Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies

(College of Education)

www.uni.edu/coe/elpe

Effective July 1, 2019 the Department of Educational Psychology and Foundations and the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education merged into one new department named Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies. The Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies offers the following minor, graduate programs, and program certificates. Specific requirements for the minor, graduate programs and program certificates are listed within this Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies section in the following order:

Minor

Graduate Major (M.A.)

Graduate Major (M.A.E.)

Graduate Major (Ed.S.)

Graduate Major (Ed.D.)

Program Certificates

Minor Programs

Educational Studies Minor

The Educational Studies minor is intended for students who are interested in the intersection of learning, education and society. Coursework provides opportunities for students to study the learning process, the organization of schooling, its links to broader political and historical contexts, and the potential of educational systems to bring about social change. This interdisciplinary program is designed specifically for undergraduates not majoring in teacher education and is offered jointly by the College of Education, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, the College of Business, and the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences. 

 The Educational Studies minor can be a valuable program addition for students pursuing careers in the social and behavioral sciences, law, social justice, or youth services. The minor is appropriate for non-teacher education majors who want to enhance their understanding of educational policy; for students who plan careers in fields where they might deal with issues related to educational institutions; and for students interested in a broad introduction to educational issues they have confronted as students as well as those they will confront as citizens and parents.

The Educational Studies minor is administered through the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies and is under the supervision of the Educational Studies Advisory Committee. Curriculum requirements consist of one core course and a minimum of twelve credit hours of electives from the courses listed below.  Students may petition the Educational Studies Advisory Committee to add a relevant course not currently listed. For more information, contact the Department of Educational Psychology and Foundations office, Schindler Education Center 525, 319-273-2694, or the department web site www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-psychology-foundations.

I. Required
Please select at least one of the following (if course is selected as a required course, it may not be chosen as an elective course from below)3
Dynamics of Human Development
Schools and American Society
II. Electives12
Choose four courses from the following list of courses with at least one course from: Category A and one Course from either Category B or C.
Category A: Psychological/Development Perspectives
Understanding Communication Disorders
Language Acquisition in Children: Birth to 5 Years
Language of School-aged Children
Dynamics of Human Development
Mental Health and Well-Being in the Classroom
Social Psychology in Educational Contexts
Theatre in Education
Category B: Sociological/Historical/Philosophical Perspectives
Idea of the University
Risk and Resilience: Child, Family, School and Community Factors
Exploring the Student Affairs Profession
Social Inequality
Schools and American Society
History of Education
Philosophy of Education
Category C: Political/Economic/Policy Perspectives
American State Politics
Community Politics
Political and Ethical Issues in Education
Current Approaches to Multicultural Education
Topics in Public Policy
Interdisciplinary Study of Disability
Bilingualism and Bilingual Education
Total hours15
III. Practicum and Research Experience - (OPTIONAL, up to 6 hrs.)
Community Service: Academic Skills Achievement Center
EDPSYCH 4198 (200:198) Independent Study

Master of Arts Degree Program

Major in Postsecondary Education: Student Affairs

This major is designed to prepare an individual for a career in the administration of student affairs programs in college and university settings.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. (Also www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education).

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. The thesis option requires a minimum of 44 semester hours, and the non-thesis option requires a minimum of 38 semester hours. A minimum of thirty-two (32) hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the thesis option. A minimum of thirty (30) hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

Students will be required to complete and present a portfolio for the exit requirement.

POSTSEC 6220Leading, Helping, Advising3
POSTSEC 6231 (170:231)Assessment in Postsecondary Education3
POSTSEC 6265Organizational and Personal Foundations for Student Affairs3
POSTSEC 6264 (170:264)Values, Philosophies and History of Student Affairs3
POSTSEC 6268Social Justice and Inclusion3
POSTSEC 6270 (170:270)College Student Development3
POSTSEC 6274Higher Education Law3
POSTSEC 6289 (170:289)Seminar in Postsecondary Education3
POSTSEC 6271Portfolio Development (1 credit course--must be taken twice)2
POSTSEC 6273Research in Student Affairs3
Electives may include, but are not limited to, the following:9
Teaching in College
The Two-Year College
College Effects on Students
Readings in Postsecondary Education
Internship in Postsecondary Education (This course may be repeated for maximum of 12 hrs.)
Educational Psychology:
Foundations of Instructional Psychology
Theories of Human Development
Measurement and Research:
Educational Research
Communication Studies:
Intercultural Communication
Gender Issues in Communication
Counseling:
Counseling Skills
Facilitating Career Development
Multicultural Counseling
Research:
Research
Total hours for non-thesis option (may include 3 hrs. of POSTSEC 6299 (170:299) as an elective choice)38
Thesis Option add
POSTSEC 6299 (170:299)Research6
Total Hours thesis option44
 

Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators 

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. (Also http://www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education).

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the non-thesis option only. A minimum of 32 hours is required on the non-thesis option. A minimum of 22 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.  Students must be currently teaching in an international school to be eligible for this program.

Successful completion of a final oral portfolio defense, as well as an extensive action research project is required prior to graduation. This program is offered to cohort groups of 15-20 students through synchronous and asynchronous instruction. New cohort groups start each year at the beginning of the spring semester.

Required
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
TESOL/Applied Linguistics:
TESOL 6286 Studies in Multilcultural Contexts3
Additional educational leadership courses:
Educational Leadership:
EDLEAD 6210Culturally Relevant Teaching & Leading3
EDLEAD 6212Teacher Leadership in International Schools3
EDLEAD 6240Technology for School Leaders2
EDLEAD 6248Leading Instruction in Schools3
EDLEAD 6249 (270:249)Leading Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum3
EDLEAD 6282 (270:282)Leading School Growth and Improvement2
EDLEAD 6284 (270:284)Evaluator Approval for Improved Student Learning3
EDLEAD 6286 Studies in Orientation to TLMS and Educational Leadership2
EDLEAD 6291 (270:291)Internship1
EDLEAD 6294Capstone TLMS1
EDLEAD 7319 (270:319)Power, Politics, and Ethics in School District Leadership3
Total Hours32
 

Master of Arts in Education Degree Program

Major in Educational Psychology: Context and Techniques of Assessment

This major is designed for students planning further graduate studies in educational or school psychology.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course number 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 35 semester hours is required for the thesis option and a minimum of 32 semester hours for the non-thesis option. A minimum of 15 hours 200/6000-level course work is required for the thesis option. A minimum of 12 hours 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

Required professional core
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Professional Studies3 or 6
Thesis Option (6 hours)
Research
Non-Thesis Option (3 hours)
Readings
M.A.E. Practicum in Education and Psychology
Research
Context and Techniques of Assessment:
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 4176/5176 (200:176g)Learning and Behavioral Problems in Education3
or SPED 4180/5180 Interdisciplinary Study of Disability
EDPSYCH 6240 (200:240)Introduction to School Psychology3
EDPSYCH 6280 (200:280)Psychological Consultation in Schools3
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6281 (250:281)Statistics and Measurement3
MEASRES 6282 (250:282)Individual Intellectual Assessment4
MEASRES 6283 (250:283)Academic Assessment and Intervention4
Literacy Education:
LITED 6238 (230:238)Advanced Assessment and Evaluation of Literacy Development3
Total hours for non-thesis option32
Total hours for thesis option35

 

Major in Educational Psychology: Professional Development for Teachers

This degree program is specially designed to fulfill the professional development needs of experienced teachers. The intent of the program is to enable participants to increase their knowledge base in content areas or to develop expertise in new content areas while sharpening their understanding and skills as classroom teachers. The program seeks to provide a course of study directly tied to teaching practice, in which course selection, student learning, and required research are organized around issues and problems which teachers view as important. The degree program provides ample opportunity for exploring the relationship between theory and practice, with a focus on improving student learning. The program presents a variety of opportunities for peer collaboration, development of strategies for implementing innovations in classroom practice, and thoughtful analysis of contemporary issues and problems facing teachers.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course number 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This degree program invites participation from early childhood, elementary, middle school, and high school teachers. This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 36 semester hours is required for the thesis option and a minimum of 33 semester hours for the non-thesis option. The thesis or research paper is expected to explore a topic that will improve classroom practice and student learning. A minimum of 15 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the thesis option. A minimum of 12 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

Required professional core
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Social Foundations:
SOCFOUND 4234/5234Philosophy of Education3
Research: xxxx:2993-6
Thesis Option (6 hrs)
Non-thesis Option (3 hrs)
Candidates should follow these three professional components when selecting coursework.
Hours from each of the following three professional components areas (selected in consultation with advisor and requires approval of the Graduate Coordinator) - 21 hours minimum:
Component I: Advanced professional course work8-12
Component II: Theoretical-philosophical course work5-9
Component III: Advanced academic course work taken from one department or one field area8-12
Thesis option total36
Non-thesis option total33

Major in Principalship

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. (Also http://www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education).

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed.  No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 41 semester hours is required on the thesis option; a minimum of 35 hours is required on the non-thesis option. A minimum of 32 hours of 200/6000-level course work, including 6 hours of EDLEAD 6299 (270:299), is required for the thesis option. A minimum of 32 hours of 200/6000-level course work is required for the non-thesis option.

Successful completion of a final oral comprehensive examination is required for the thesis option. The student must complete the usual degree and licensure/endorsement requirements and must complete a minimum of one year of successful teaching appropriate to the major prior to graduation. For endorsement the student must have three years of teaching experience at either the elementary or secondary level. This program is offered to cohort groups of 20-25 students on and off campus through the Web, and in face-to-face instructional sessions. New cohort groups start each year at the beginning of the fall semester.

Required program courses
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
or
Leading Instruction in Schools
Special Education:
SPED 6260 (220:260)Special Education Law and Policy3
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Additional educational leadership courses
Educational Leadership:
EDLEAD 6206 (270:206)Orientation to ISSL and Educational Leadership2
EDLEAD 6232 (270:232)School Governance, Law and Intersystems Relations3
EDLEAD 6245 (270:245)Leadership for Effective Schools3
EDLEAD 6247 (270:247)School Management for Student Learning3
EDLEAD 6249 (270:249)Leading Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum3
EDLEAD 6282 (270:282)Leading School Growth and Improvement2
EDLEAD 6284 (270:284)Evaluator Approval for Improved Student Learning3
EDLEAD 6289 (270:289)Seminar in Educational Leadership2
EDLEAD 6225Activities Administration2
or EDLEAD 6235 Community Connections
Educational Leadership:
EDLEAD 6291 (270:291)Internship2
EDLEAD 6292 (270:292)Capstone ISSL1
Total hours non-thesis Option
Total Hours35
Thesis Option add
EDLEAD 6299 (270:299)Research6
Total Hours thesis option41
 

Specialist in Education Degree Program

The major in School Psychology at the University of Northern Iowa leading to the Specialist in Education Degree involves breadth of preparation as well as depth in a particular field of specialization.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies for other application requirements and detailed information on the School Psychology major. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. For requirements concerning admission, program approval, candidacy, scholarship, residence, examinations, thesis, and graduation for the Specialist in Education Degree see the "Graduate Information" section of this University Catalog.

Only graduate courses (course number 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

Course work requirements for the Specialist in Education Degree are defined in terms of a three-year graduate program, including internship and work taken on the master's degree. A minimum of 68 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree is required for completing the program.

The School Psychology major is open to students who hold a master's degree from an accredited graduate school, and who meet the requirements set forth below.

Major in School Psychology

Admission to the Ed.S. program in School Psychology requires an earned, accredited master's degree and a prior graduate preparation equivalent to UNI's M.A.E. in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Context and Techniques of Assessment.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is required for admission to the program.

Students with deficiencies will be notified prior to admission. Any deficiencies in the student's background will be added to the student's Ed.S. program requirements.

This major is available on the thesis option and non-thesis option.

For the thesis option, a minimum of 39 semester hours is required. For the non-thesis option, a minimum of 36 semester hours is required. A minimum of 15 hours of 2000/6000-level course work is required for either option. Successful completion of a final oral and written examination is required.

Required
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 4232/5232Risk and Resilience: Child, Family, School and Community Factors3
EDPSYCH 6270Behavioral Interventions in School Settings3
EDPSYCH 6272Systems Consultation3
Measurement and Research:
MEASRES 6284 (250:284)Psychosocial Assessment4
MEASRES 6287Early Childhood Assessment and Intervention3
Professional Studies:
EDPSYCH 6290 (200:290)Ed.S. Practicum in Education and Psychology5
EDPSYCH 6291 (200:291)Internship in School Psychology6
Special Education:
SPED 6260 (220:260)Special Education Law and Policy3
Counseling & Behavior Modification
One of the following:3
Counseling Children and Adolescents
Evidence Based Treatment
Thesis Option6
Research
Non-Thesis Option3
Monitoring Progress in Individuals and Groups
Total hours36-39

Doctor of Education Degree Program

(For all requirements see website www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation - for PDF version see listing for "College of Education" under the "Interdisciplinary" section of this university catalog.)

The Doctor of Education Degree is one degree supervised through the College of Education. It can be completed with one of the following Intensive Study Area concentrations:

  • Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Leadership

Students interested in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the appropriate Intensive Study Area (ISA) for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admission to the program.

This program is intended to provide practicing educators, in formal and nonformal settings, the opportunity to continue their study and earn the terminal professional degree in their field. The Ed.D. degree requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit beyond the master's degree There are three components to the program:

By design, all students are required to study in basic areas that undergird and define educational practice and develop skills of problem definition, data collection and analysis, and interpretation. The three areas of intensive study provide for a specialized focus on practice.

Note: Students interested in special education with the Curriculum and Instruction ISA or the Educational Leadership ISA should consult the respective ISA descriptions for further information.

In some areas, it is possible to combine doctoral degree study with work toward an endorsement to perform a particular role in K-12 education.

Brief definitions of the three ISAs follows:

Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services

This area of intensive study is designed to provide students with advanced planning, management, supervision and evaluation of programs in the community and its institutions. The combined areas of allied health, recreation and community services are diverse professional areas knitted together by a unified commitment to enhancing, enriching and sustaining individual well-being and quality of life. Each of these areas contributes unique and different professional perspectives, yet, at the same time, focuses on the individual and collective well-being of people, communities and society as a whole. Graduates are prepared for careers as applied scholars, evaluators, athletic administration, administrators of community nonprofit organizations, youth serving agencies, public parks and recreation agencies, foundations, and government agencies. The program of study will be based upon student's needs, interests, and upon approval by an academic advisor and program of study committee. (For more information, contact the Chair of Leisure, Youth and Human Services, Health Promotion and Education, or Athletic Training in the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services.)

Curriculum and Instruction

This area of intensive study is designed to prepare scholar practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children, from infancy through adolescence, and adult learners, inclusive of a wide variety of diversity. Faculty in this intensive study area come from many departments and disciplines, including but not limited to prekindergarten through tertiary curriculum and pedagogy; foundations of education in psychology, philosophy, social sciences; disability studies, gifted and talented, and multicultural education; literacy education; instructional technology, school library studies; and P-12 content areas such as mathematics, physical education, science, social studies, and language arts. Students interested in becoming special education scholar-practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children and adult learners with an emphasis on inclusion and diversity will apply for admission through the Curriculum and Instruction Intensive Study Area. For more information see http://www.uni.edu/coe/departments/curriculum-instruction/graduate-study/doctoral-study.

Educational Leadership

This area of intensive study in education administration prepares personnel for leadership positions in PK-12 schools, post-secondary institutions, and other educational services or settings. Typical positions held by educators with the terminal degree focused on educational leadership include: principals, superintendents, school district central office administrators, professors of educational leadership, special education directors at the Area Education Agency level or Department of Education administrators and consultants. Students interested in special education administration will apply for admission through Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies. (For more information, contact the Head, Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies, or please see the catalog at www.uni.edu/catalog.uni.edu/collegeofeducation/educationalleadershipandpostsecondaryeducation or visit the Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, and Leadership Studies website at www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education.

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following program certificates contact the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Advanced Studies Certificate in Educational Leadership

Emphasis: Principalship

This is a post-master's program consisting of a minimum of 35 semester hours leading to the issuance of an Advanced Studies Certificate in Educational Leadership. The purpose of this program is to allow the student to broaden and sharpen her/his skills in competency areas. This is solely for the purpose of gaining endorsement in the Principalship.

The program will consist of a minimum of 35 semester hours in graduate studies in the area of educational leadership and/or related studies.

Required
Educational Psychology:
EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214)Foundations of Instructional Psychology3
or
Leading Instruction in Schools
MEASRES 6205 (250:205)Educational Research3
Special Education:
SPED 6260 (220:260)Special Education Law and Policy3
Educational Leadership:
EDLEAD 6206 (270:206)Orientation to ISSL and Educational Leadership2
EDLEAD 6232 (270:232)School Governance, Law and Intersystems Relations3
EDLEAD 6245 (270:245)Leadership for Effective Schools3
EDLEAD 6247 (270:247)School Management for Student Learning3
EDLEAD 6249 (270:249)Leading Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum3
EDLEAD 6282 (270:282)Leading School Growth and Improvement2
EDLEAD 6284 (270:284)Evaluator Approval for Improved Student Learning3
EDLEAD 6289 (270:289)Seminar in Educational Leadership2
EDLEAD 6225Activities Administration2
or EDLEAD 6235 Community Connections
Educational Leadership Internship:
EDLEAD 6291 (270:291)Internship2
EDLEAD 6292 (270:292)Capstone ISSL1
Total Hours35

Emphasis: Superintendency Preparation Program

The superintendent preparation program consists of 33 hours which includes a four hour Seminar in Educational Leadership delivered in three separate segments (2 credit hours, 1 credit hour, 1 credit hour); six 3-credit hour courses, one 2-credit hour course, and 9 credit hours of internship requiring 450 contact hours in multiple school districts.

Required
Educational Leadership:
EDLEAD 7310 (270:310)Human Resource Administration3
EDLEAD 7311 (270:311)Educational Leadership and Systems Change3
EDLEAD 7315 (270:315)Leading Teaching, Learning and Assessment3
EDLEAD 7318 (270:318)Evaluation of Administrators2
EDLEAD 7319 (270:319)Power, Politics, and Ethics in School District Leadership3
EDLEAD 7340 (270:340)Funding the Educational Program for Improved Student Achievement3
EDLEAD 7346 (270:346)School Business Management3
Educational Leadership seminar:
EDLEAD 7389 (270:389)Seminar in Educational Leadership *4
Educational Leadership work toward development of internship plan:
EDLEAD 7391 (270:391)Internship in Educational Leadership1
Educational Leadership internship:
EDLEAD 7391 (270:391)Internship in Educational Leadership8
Total Hours33

Internship

The nine credit hours of internship is designed to "provide opportunities for candidates to identify and experience the complexities of the superintendency in a structured, accountable manner."

To ensure that candidates have a range of experiences and "the program provides opportunities for candidates to identify and experience the complexities of the superintendency in a structured, accountable manner," each course in the Superintendent Preparation Program will have a knowledge module (what the superintendent should know) and a field performance module (what the superintendent should be able to do).

The internship requires a minimum of 450 hours. The field performance module (course assigned internship activities) requirements are expected to total between 210 and 280 hours. In addition to the course assigned internship activities, the candidate's Internship Plan will be guided by experience needs of the candidate in the areas of Leader of Learners, Leader of Service, and Leader of Change.

The Internship requires a meaningful long-term (substantial) clinical experience within a district. This extended experience combines with the performance module (course assigned) internship activities to form the candidate's Internship Plan.

Each candidate will have a lead mentor, approved by the Educational Leadership faculty, who will guide the candidate throughout the internship experience. Even though some clinical experiences may take place in another district or districts, the lead mentor will serve as a sounding board while providing coaching and support. In addition to the lead mentor, each candidate will have at least one other mentor (mentor with special expertise), approved by the faculty, to ensure diversity of school size, diversity of thought, diversity of expertise, and diversity of experiences. While a candidate may use a mentor from his or her district of employment who meets the Mentor Selection Criteria, the candidate must also have an approved mentor (lead mentor or mentor with special expertise) outside the district of employment.

Assessment

A performance-based program requires evidence that Iowa Standards for School Leaders (ISSL) and 16 superintendent leadership exit proficiencies are met. Standards and proficiencies must be demonstrated through work products that clearly show skill development and an expansive knowledge base.

 
 

Postsecondary Education: Student Affairs, M.A.

1. Students will demonstrate written communication skills.

2. Students will demonstrate oral communication abilities.

3. Students will demonstrate knowledge and growth in ten competencies designated by ACPA / NASPA.

Teacher Leadership for International Educators, M.A.

  1. Students will be capable of demonstrating, in written form, thoughtful understanding, application and analysis of specific teacher Leader Model Standards - collaborative culture, research & data to improve practice, promote professional learning, facilitate improvement in instruction and student learning, promote the use of assessments and data, improve outreach, and advocate for the profession;

  2. Students will design, implement, and assess a contextually-based dilemma through action research; and

  3. Students will demonstrate writing skills consistent with graduate level work.

Educational Psychology: Context and Techniques of Assessment, M.A.E.

  1. School psychology students will practice data-based decision making in all areas of school psychology practice.

  2. School psychology students will develop evidence-based interventions in academic,  social-emotional, and behavioral domains.

  3. School psychology students will apply a problem-solving model in making ethical decisions.

  4. School psychology students will use data to support school systems, including preventive and responsive support services

  5. School psychology students will consider and respect differences in gender, culture, ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation and will promote a safe and respectful school environment for all individuals.

  6. School psychology students will engage in reflective practice

  7. School psychology students will communicate clearly both verbally and in writing

  8. School psychology students will demonstrate quality consultation and collaboration with educational professionals, families, and students.

  9. School psychology students will display professional behaviors throughout the program (e.g., meeting timelines, professional communication)

  10. School psychology students will provide services that promote family-school collaboration

Educational Psychology: Professional Development for Teachers, M.A.E.

The MAE in Educational Psychology: Professional Development for Teachers is specially designed to fulfill the professional development needs of experienced teachers. The intent of the program is to enable  participants to increase their knowledge base in content areas or to develop expertise in new content areas while sharpening their understanding and skills as classroom teachers. The program seeks to provide a course of study directly tied to teaching practice, in which course selection, student learning, and required research are organized around issues and problems that teachers view as important. The degree program provides opportunities for exploring the relationship between theory and practice via action research, with a focus on improving student learning. The program presents a variety of opportunities for peer collaboration, development of strategies for implementing innovations in classroom practice, and thoughtful analysis of contemporary issues and problems facing teachers.

  1. PDT students will increase knowledge and skills necessary to be critical consumers of educational research.

  2. PDT students will develop knowledge and skills necessary to plan and describe an action research project.

Principalship, M.A.E.

  1. Students will demonstrate in writing a thoughtful understanding, application and analysis of specific Iowa Standards for School Leaders - shared vision, culture of learning, management, family & community, ethics, and societal context

  2. Students will orally present a thoughtful understanding, application and analysis of specific Iowa Standards for School Leaders - shared vision, culture of learning, management, family & community, ethics, and societal context.

  3. Students will compile a portfolio of evidence demonstrating a thoughtful understanding, application and analysis of specific Iowa Standards for School Leaders - shared vision, culture of learning, management, family & community, ethics, and societal context.  

Specialist in Education: School Psychology, Ed.S.

  1. School psychology students will practice data-based decision making in all areas of school psychology practice.

  2. School psychology students will develop evidence-based interventions in academic,  social-emotional, and behavioral domains.

  3. School psychology students will apply a problem-solving model in making ethical decisions.

  4. School psychology students will use data to support school systems, including preventive and responsive support services

  5. School psychology students will consider and respect differences in gender, culture, ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation and will promote a safe and respectful school environment for all individuals.

  6. School psychology students will engage in reflective practice

  7. School psychology students will communicate clearly both verbally and in writing

  8. School psychology students will demonstrate quality consultation and collaboration with educational professionals, families, and students.

  9. School psychology students will display professional behaviors throughout the program (e.g., meeting timelines, professional communication)

  10. School psychology students will provide services that promote family-school collaboration

Doctor of Education: Educational Leadership, Ed.D.

  1. Students demonstrate commitment to professional development, social justice, and personal growth by incorporating effective, adaptive, and creative responses to meet changes and challenges in global society.

2.      Students analyze, implement, and integrate knowledge, theory, practice, and research findings to lead and make informed decisions in their professional practice.

3.     Students will effectively communicate (both written and oral) important, complex problems-of-practice in relation to past research, current practices, and potential future impacts of solutions.

Education, Interdepartmental Courses

INTDEPED 7301 (190:301). Major Thinkers in Education over the Last 3,000 Years — 3 hrs.

An investigation of main ideas and perspectives from foundational scholars across fields of philosophy, sociology, history, and psychology who are perceived to have made major contributions in the field of education. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status or consent of college. (Variable)

INTDEPED 7303 (190:303). Foundations of Inquiry — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the intellectual foundations of educational and social inquiry. Includes the history and major positions of philosophy as well as their application to the practice of inquiry. Includes attention to the theory and practice of scholarship through critical reading and academic writing. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status or consent of college. (Variable)

INTDEPED 7314. Qualitative Research Design for Practice — 3 hrs.

This course focuses on qualitative research designs. Various qualitative methodologies will be used related to identifying, understanding, and solving complex problems of practice. The course will focus on developing conceptual understandings of a problem, ethics of inquiry and practice, and design of an inquiry plan from a qualitative perspective. Students will complete collection, analysis, and synthesis of data for problems of practice, including reporting results and use of data in practice and for broader dissemination. Prerequisite(s): MEASRES 6205 (250:205) or KAHHS 6290 or equivalent, and a substantial introductory statistics course (MEASRES 4180 or KAHHS 6210 or equivalent); INTDEPED 7326; Admission to the Ed.D. program. (Spring)

INTDEPED 7316. Quantitative Research Design for Practice — 3 hrs.

This course focuses on quantitative research designs. Various quantitative methodologies are used for identifying, understanding, and solving complex problems of practice. The course will focus on developing conceptual understandings of a problem, ethics of inquiry and practice, and design of an inquiry plan from a quantitative perspective. Students will complete collection, analysis, and synthesis of data for problems of practice, including reporting results and use of data in practice and for broader dissemination. Prerequisite(s): MEASRES 6205 (250:205) or KAHHS 6290 or equivalent, and a substantial introductory statistics course (MEASRES 4180 or KAHHS 6210 or equivalent); INTDEPED 7326; Admission to the Ed.D. program. (Fall)

INTDEPED 7318. Evidence-Based Practices, Assessment, Accountability, and Program Evaluation — 3 hrs.

In today's world of professional practice, simply running a program is not good enough. Modern practice must use assessment and evaluation results. This course provides needed tools. Provides multiple theoretical perspectives as well as hands-on practice. Prerequisite(s): admission to Ed.D. program; INTDEPED 7303 (190:303). (Variable)

INTDEPED 7320. Leadership in Formal and Informal Learning Environments — 3 hrs.

This course examines leadership, theory, and practice in formal and informal learning environments and promotes comprehensive application strategies to such settings as schools, human services, and leisure, tourism, and environmental organizations. Prerequisite(s): admission to Ed.D. program; INTDEPED 7303 (190:303). (Variable)

INTDEPED 7322. Organizational and Community Transformation — 3 hrs.

Exploration of transformational processes and the forces that shape change in communities and organizations on a macro, meso, and micro scale within the context of promoting and responding to social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental change including institutions and agencies. Prerequisite(s): admission to Ed.D. program; INTDEPED 7303 (190:303). (Variable)

INTDEPED 7324. Critical Analysis of Social and Cultural Contexts in Education — 3 hrs.

Explores historic and contemporary social, legal, and cultural movements in education and professional practice from sociological and critical perspectives. Indepth focus on philosophy, science, attitudes, belief patterns, and practices related to social and cultural diversity. Prerequisite(s): Doctoral status or consent of college, INTDEPED 7303 (190:303) (Variable)

INTDEPED 7326. Integrating Theory with Practice — 3 hrs.

This course is designed to prepare entry-level doctoral students in the Ed.D. program for examining complex theoretical frameworks and how theory relates to practice. Students will be exposed to numerous theories from a variety of content areas, faculty research endeavors, and strategies for linking current research trends to their current practice. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Ed.D. program. (Fall and Spring)

INTDEPED 7389 (190:389). Doctoral Seminar — 3 hrs.

This course supports Ed.D. students in examining the facets of the doctoral degree, setting scholarly agendas, and developing publication skills. More specifically, the course will focus on doctoral core and intensive study area requirements, advisor selection, dissertation committee selection, and general and specific expectations for the completion of the Ed.D Graded. Prerequisite(s): INTDEPED 7314, INTDEPED 7316, Doctoral status or consent of college. (Variable)

INTDEPED 7399 (190:399). Dissertation Research.

Credit/no credit only. Initial enrollment requires attendance at doctoral research seminar. (Fall and Spring)

Educational Leadership Courses

EDLEAD 4198 (270:198). Independent Study — 1-6 hrs.

(Variable)

EDLEAD 4319. Political and Ethical Issues in Education — 3 hrs.

Students will become familiar with issues of power, politics and ethics in education systems. The course will examine ways in which individuals in leadership positions use power and political skills to influence the effectiveness of educational systems and the ethical challenges that arise from such efforts. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6206 (270:206). Orientation to ISSL and Educational Leadership — 2 hrs.

Orientation to the study and practice of school leadership, the Iowa Standards for School Leaders (ISSL), current and historical trends impacting school and the principalship, and philosophical perspectives impacting school leadership. Corequisite(s): EDLEAD 6247 (270:247). (Fall)

EDLEAD 6210. Culturally Relevant Teaching & Leading — 3 hrs.

Examine the practical implications of culturally relevant teaching practices with particular attention to curriculum design and implementation for global citizens. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6212. Teacher Leadership in International Schools — 3 hrs.

An in-depth look at the knowledge and skills necessary to be teacher leaders in international school settings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6225. Activities Administration — 2 hrs.

The study and in-school application of current research and promising practices related to the administration of PK-12 school activities programs, including athletics, fine arts, clubs, etc. and their role in school's overall programming and mission. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6206 (270:206); EDLEAD 6247 (270:247); or consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6232 (270:232). School Governance, Law and Intersystems Relations — 3 hrs.

Development of knowledge of the many aspects of local, regional, state, and federal governance of public schools, legal issues, school funding, respect for people's rights, and competence in managing school risk to avoid legal liability. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6206 (270:206); EDLEAD 6245 (270:245). (Variable)

EDLEAD 6235. Community Connections — 2 hrs.

Exploration and in-school/community application of current research on promising practices and strategies that support parental and community engagement in the school's mission and the principal's role in facilitating stakeholder engagement. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6206 (270:206); EDLEAD 6247 (270:247); or consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6240. Technology for School Leaders — 2 hrs.

Course explores current promising practice in technology use for building school leaders. Prerequisite(s): admitted to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6245 (270:245). Leadership for Effective Schools — 3 hrs.

Study of contemporary leadership, change, and staff development in school organizations. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6247 (270:247). School Management for Student Learning — 3 hrs.

Examination of key administrative management concepts and techniques employed by effective school principals to support student learning and achievement. Corequisite(s): EDLEAD 6206 (270:206). (Variable)

EDLEAD 6248. Leading Instruction in Schools — 3 hrs.

Intensive study of the knowledge and skills needed by teacher leaders to support Professional Learning Communities, effectively use technology, develop teacher leadership, and embrace the role of the instructional leader. Prerequisite(s): admission to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6249 (270:249). Leading Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum — 3 hrs.

(Tailored for teacher leaders in American international schools) Extensive study in the knowledge and skills needed by teacher leaders to help lead the development and delivery of curriculum, assessment and instruction focused on student achievement. Prerequisite(s): admitted to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6251. Supporting Instruction in the Classroom — 3 hrs.

Supporting Instruction in the Classroom - will address the theoretical and practical models for instructional coaching and the tools to support teachers (and the coaches themselves) while using school data to inform instruction. Students will master content regarding Student-Centered Coaching developed by Diane Sweeney, learn and apply principles of Instructional Rounds in Education by City, Elmore, Fairman, and Lee, and attain knowledge and strategies for Building Teachers' Capacity for Success by Hall and Simeral. Students will have opportunities to reflect on current practices, identify, develop and implement coaching strategies that best fit their personal situations, and collaborate with other instructional coaches through various forms of social media. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6248. (Fall and Spring)

EDLEAD 6252. Coaching Teachers — 3 hrs.

This graduate credit course is designed to apply educational research and leadership principles in a shared leadership environment. Those interested in, or currently engaged in, teacher leadership roles in their buildings and/or districts will find this course to be practical and applicable. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6248, EDLEAD 6251. (Fall and Spring)

EDLEAD 6282 (270:282). Leading School Growth and Improvement — 2 hrs.

Study of the teacher leader's role in leading school growth and improvement and the change process. Prerequisite(s): admitted to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6284 (270:284). Evaluator Approval for Improved Student Learning — 3 hrs.

Development of knowledge of various problems and procedures in the organization of elementary and secondary school professional growth. Special emphasis on supervision processes and identifying and analyzing effective teaching and performance behaviors. Prerequisite(s): admitted to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6285 (270:285). Readings in Educational Leadership.

Prerequisite(s): written consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6289 (270:289). Seminar in Educational Leadership.

Seminars offered on special topics as indicated in the Schedule of Classes. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6291 (270:291). Internship — 1 hr.

Advanced supervised experience to further develop skills in Teacher Leader Model Standards. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. May be repeated for maximum of 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): admitted to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators or M.A.E. Major in Principalship. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6292 (270:292). Capstone ISSL — 1 hr.

Final work project that demonstrates application and synthesizes the Iowa Standards for School Leaders (ISSL). Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 6206 (270:206); EDLEAD 6247 (270:247); or consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6294. Capstone TLMS — 1 hr.

(Tailored for teacher leaders in American international schools) Culminating activities that demonstrate application and synthesize the 7 Teacher Leader Model Standards Prerequisite(s): Admission to the M.A. Major in Teacher Leadership for International Educators. (Variable)

EDLEAD 6299 (270:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7310 (270:310). Human Resource Administration — 3 hrs.

Teacher selection and placement, promotion, tenure, collective bargaining and retirement; administration of pupil personnel facilitating services. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7311 (270:311). Educational Leadership and Systems Change — 3 hrs.

Examination of knowledge base for both change and leadership. Emphasis on understanding how change factors and leadership styles interact to influence receptiveness to and acceptance of change. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status or consent of college. (Same as POSTSEC 7311 (170:311)) (Variable)

EDLEAD 7315 (270:315). Leading Teaching, Learning and Assessment — 3 hrs.

Focus on what boards of education need to know and be able to do; and the leadership role of the board/superintendent team for improving student achievement by sharing culture and conditions within the school district that contribute to productive change. Prerequisite(s): students must be enrolled in the superintendency preparation program cohort or doctoral program in educational leadership or have permission of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7318 (270:318). Evaluation of Administrators — 2 hrs.

Provides superintendents and other educational leaders with knowledge and skills necessary in the supervision and evaluation process in K-12 schools. The Iowa Professional Development Model serves as a foundation for this course. Prerequisite(s): students must be enrolled in the superintendency preparation program cohort or the doctoral program. The instructor may grant special permission to graduate students outside educational leadership. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7319 (270:319). Power, Politics, and Ethics in School District Leadership — 3 hrs.

Identifies critical roles of teacher leaders and network of individuals/agencies/organizations that impact education system. Develops understanding of how to identify community's power structure and use power/political skills in ethical ways to improve student achievement. Prerequisite(s): Consent of program coordinator. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7340 (270:340). Funding the Educational Program for Improved Student Achievement — 3 hrs.

Focus on how public schools in U.S. are funded, with special attention to funding public schools in Iowa. Major emphasis on funding and allocation of resources for the improvement of student achievement. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7346 (270:346). School Business Management — 3 hrs.

Develops the rationale for the function of school business administration. Assists school administrators in managing business affairs and auxiliary services of the school district. Prerequisite(s): EDLEAD 7340 (270:340); master's degree in Educational Leadership or the Principalship certification. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7385 (270:385). Readings in Educational Leadership.

Individualized list of selected readings in an area of emphasis, as determined by instructor and student. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): written consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7389 (270:389). Seminar in Educational Leadership.

Offered on special topics as determined and scheduled by the department. May be repeated. Limited to post-master's students. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7391 (270:391). Internship in Educational Leadership — 1-9 hrs.

Advanced supervised experience to further develop skills. May be repeated. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): consent of advisor. (Variable)

EDLEAD 7397 (270:397). Practicum in Educational Leadership — 2-4 hrs.

May be repeated. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Limited to post-master's students. Prerequisite(s): consent of advisor. (Fall and Spring)

Educational Psychology Courses

EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030). Dynamics of Human Development — 3 hrs.

Students in this course will examine the social contexts of human development (0-18 years of age) and the theoretical and historical perspectives that inform our understanding of development. In particular cross-cultural lenses will be used to uncover the cultural nature of development. Implications of these perspectives for supporting the development of individuals across multiple domains (e.g., physical, cognitive, psychosocial) will be discussed. Examination of diverse viewpoints, theories, and methods of inquiry provide an avenue for students to develop skills in critical thinking and analysis and communicate their findings both orally and in writing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EDPSYCH 3109. Development and Assessment of Young Children — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of children's development and its assessment from birth through grade three. Emphasis on examining developmental differences among individual children and implications for developmentally and individually appropriate classroom practice. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) or equivalent or consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148). Learning and Motivation in Classroom Contexts — 3 hrs.

Examination of the influence of cognitive, motivational, and socio-cultural factors on students' learning in classroom contexts, with an emphasis on implications for classroom instruction and improved student achievement. Prerequisite(s): TEACHING 2017; EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030); or equivalents. Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative 2.50 or higher to enroll in this course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EDPSYCH 4116/5116 (200:116g). Psychology of Adolescence — 2 hrs.

Psychological concepts applied to adolescent intellectual, physical, and psychosocial behaviors; designed to improve understanding of, and relationships with, adolescents and their search for identity. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) or equivalent; junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4118/5118 (200:118g). Mental Health and Well-Being in the Classroom — 3 hrs.

Basic principles of mental health as they apply to the entirety of the educative enterprise. Focus on causative factors relating to the mental health of teachers and students, and ways of arranging classroom environments which maximize learning and minimize threat and self devaluation. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) or equivalent; junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4140/5140 (200:140g). Social Psychology in Educational Contexts — 3 hrs.

Students in this course learn to apply social psychological perspectives when interpreting educational situations and events. Through reading and discussion students map the influence of self-definition, motivation, relationships, and familial, school, and neighborhood contexts to educational outcomes. Students evaluate interventions based on social psychological principles and consider their role in educational and social transformation. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4151/5151 (200:151g). Approaches to Classroom Management for Secondary Students — 3 hrs.

Strategies and processes designed to create and maintain classroom management intended to nurture the atmosphere leading to increased academic achievement and personal development of adolescent students. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030); EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148); or equivalents; junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4152/5152 (200:152g). Development of the Middle School Aged Child — 3 hrs.

Focus on the cognitive, physical, social and emotional development of the middle school aged child (ages 11 to 15). Examination of the contexts of the middle school child including the home, school, and peers. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4157/5157. Interpersonal Forgiveness — 3 hrs.

This course consists of a psychological and philosophical examination of forgiveness and will focus primarily on interpersonal forgiveness, the gift an injured person gives to the one who hurt him or her. Topics include what forgiveness is and is not, forgiveness in philosophy, the process of forgiveness, applications and benefits of forgiveness, forgiveness in education, and forgiveness and bullying. Students will also read about self-forgiveness, group and cultural perspectives of forgiveness and community and national issues related to forgiveness. By the end of the course, students will have gained a greater understanding and knowledge of the psychology of interpersonal forgiveness. The course will also help students improve their writing and critical thinking skills. (Fall or Spring)

EDPSYCH 4176/5176 (200:176g). Learning and Behavioral Problems in Education — 3 hrs.

Learning and behavior problems of students with focus on issues of identification, etiology, assessment, developmental changes, and intervention including consideration of personal, social, cultural, historical, and economic contexts. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 4180/5180 (200:180g). Community Service: Academic Skills Achievement Center — 2-4 hrs.

Tutorial experience in multicultural school setting. Collateral seminar for sharing personal insights and discussion of core readings on cultural pluralism. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior standing or consent of department head. (Fall and Spring)

EDPSYCH 4188/5188 (200:188g). Current Approaches to Multicultural Education — 3 hrs.

Comparison of alternative models of multicultural education and study of their application in school settings. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Spring)

EDPSYCH 4198 (200:198). Independent Study — 1-6 hrs.

(Variable)

EDPSYCH 4232/5232. Risk and Resilience: Child, Family, School and Community Factors — 3 hrs.

Examination of children's cognitive and psychosocial development within family, school and community contexts, socio-historical factors which impact children, families, schools and communities, and implications for elementary school curricula and pedagogy. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 6214 (200:214). Foundations of Instructional Psychology — 3 hrs.

Study of factors involved in designing and implementing effective instructional environments. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EDPSYCH 6224 (200:224). Adult Development and Learning — 3 hrs.

Overview of individual development from young adulthood through middle adulthood. Emphasis is breadth and range of individual growth and development during the adult years. Focus on psychological issues associated with social, emotional, and cognitive development, and adult learning and teaching. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 6235 (200:235). Theories of Human Development — 3 hrs.

Major theories of human development (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive, developmental, humanistic, and social learning theory). Includes study of noted theorists in each area and educational implications and applications of their work. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 3109 or EDPSYCH 4116/5116 (200:116g). (Variable)

EDPSYCH 6240 (200:240). Introduction to School Psychology — 3 hrs.

Psychological services in schools; roles and functions of school psychologists; review of professional, legal and ethical standards and implications for practice. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAE in Educational Psychology with Context and Techniques of Assessment Emphasis (School Psychology program). (Fall)

EDPSYCH 6270. Behavioral Interventions in School Settings — 3 hrs.

Overview of evidence-based interventions to address the social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students; using assessment data to develop student goals and monitor student progress; supervised practice developing, implementing, and monitoring interventions in the schools. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. program in School Psychology or instructor permission. (Fall)

EDPSYCH 6272. Systems Consultation — 3 hrs.

Examination of the multiple systems involved in PK-12 education, the organizational change process, and the context of current educational practice and reform. Application of these concepts to various systems level issues. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. program in School Psychology or instructor permission. (Spring)

EDPSYCH 6280 (200:280). Psychological Consultation in Schools — 3 hrs.

Overview of major theoretical models of consultation (including systems level consultation), an in-depth opportunity to develop behavioral consultation and intervention skills through an authentic referral, and an emphasis on professional accountability through monitoring the effects of intervention. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAE in Educational Psychology with Context and Techniques of Assessment Emphasis (School Psychology program). (Spring)

EDPSYCH 6285 (200:285). Readings.

(Variable)

EDPSYCH 6288. M.A.E. Practicum in Education and Psychology — 1-3 hrs.

Practicum placement for first year graduate school psychology students. Placements coordinated with instructor of record. Class meetings and assignments required. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAE in Educational Psychology with Context and Techniques of Assessment Emphasis or instructor permission. (Fall and Spring)

EDPSYCH 6289 (200:289). Seminar in Education and Psychology — 1-6 hrs.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

EDPSYCH 6290 (200:290). Ed.S. Practicum in Education and Psychology — 1-6 hrs.

Practicum placement for second year graduate school psychology students. Placements coordinated with instructor of record. Class meetings and assignments required. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. program in School Psychology. (Fall and Spring)

EDPSYCH 6291 (200:291). Internship in School Psychology — 1-6 hrs.

Supervised off-campus field experience. May be repeated for maximum 6 hours. (Fall and Spring)

EDPSYCH 6299 (200:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall and Spring)

Measurement and Research Courses

MEASRES 3150 (250:150). Classroom Assessment — 2 hrs.

This course is an introduction to the purposes and development of classroom assessment with a focus on diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment. Additional course topics include assessment ethics, standards of quality in assessment, communication of assessment data, the use of assessment data to make instructional decisions, and standardized assessment. Prerequisite(s): TEACHING 2017; EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030). Registration requires full admission to the Teacher Education Program. Must have a cumulative 2.50 gpa or higher to enroll in this course. Physical Education majors may substitute PEMES 3174 (420:174) for MEASRES 3150 (250:150). Early Childhood Education majors and Music Education majors will be waived from MEASRES 3150 (250:150). Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): TEACHING 3128; EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

MEASRES 4181/5181 (250:181g). Educational Evaluation in Teaching — 3 hrs.

Principles of measurement and evaluation in the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary schools. Test construction techniques for written tests and performance tests, with norm-referenced and criterion-referenced interpretations; uses of teacher-made instruments and standardized tests. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148); MEASRES 3150 (250:150) or equivalent; junior standing. (Variable)

MEASRES 6205 (250:205). Educational Research — 3 hrs.

An introduction to research methods relevant to educational research with an emphasis on how these methods address the challenges of conducting research in applied settings such as schools. Course content includes a survey of major types of research designs (both quantitative and qualitative) and their associated approaches for minimizing bias, establishing validity, collecting data, and drawing conclusions. A primary goal of this course is to equip students with an understanding of basic concepts and tools so they can systematically locate, efficiently read and critically evaluate empirical research studies. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

MEASRES 6250. Descriptive Educational Research — 3 hrs.

Examination of theoretical and practical aspects of survey research including sampling, instrumental design and administration, and application of computer techniques to the analysis of survey information. Prerequisite(s): MEASRES 6205 (250:205). (Variable)

MEASRES 6260. Monitoring Progress in Individuals and Groups — 3 hrs.

Examination of models, data collection methods, analysis, and report preparation for educational single-case, small group, and program evaluations. Attention to application of intervention evaluation in school settings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School Psychology Ed.S. Program. (Fall)

MEASRES 6270 (250:270). Educational Program Evaluation — 3 hrs.

Examination of models, data-gathering methods, analysis, and report preparation for educational program evaluation; attention to application of evaluation research to specific school and non-school settings. Prerequisite(s): MEASRES 6205 (250:205). (Variable)

MEASRES 6281 (250:281). Statistics and Measurement — 3 hrs.

Application of statistical principles to research in school psychology. Topics selected from correlational analysis; reliability and validity; analysis of variance; sampling; chi-square, t, and F distributions. Emphasis on statistical inference and basic measurement principles. (Summer)

MEASRES 6282 (250:282). Individual Intellectual Assessment — 4 hrs.

Administration, scoring, and interpretation of widely used scales of intelligence. Consideration of cognitive assessment issues, including conceptualizations of intelligence, racial and ethnic bias, and applications in school settings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAE in Educational Psychology with Context and Techniques of Assessment Emphasis program (School Psychology program). (Fall)

MEASRES 6283 (250:283). Academic Assessment and Intervention — 4 hrs.

Ecological approach to academic assessment and intervention; discussion of curriculum-based and standardized measures, ethical considerations and measurement principles; and introduction to academic interventions. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAE in Educational Psychology with Context and Techniques of Assessment Emphasis program (School Psychology program). (Spring)

MEASRES 6284 (250:284). Psychosocial Assessment — 4 hrs.

Assessment of socio-emotional development of individual students, including interpretation and dissemination of results; ethical considerations and measurement principles. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. in School Psychology program. (Fall)

MEASRES 6285 (250:285). Readings.

(Variable)

MEASRES 6287. Early Childhood Assessment and Intervention — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of the young child, birth through age 8, with a focus on development, assessment, intervention, and mental health. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Ed.S. program in School Psychology or instructor permission. (Spring)

MEASRES 6289 (250:289). Seminar in Evaluation and Research.

(Variable)

MEASRES 6299 (250:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

MEASRES 7310 (250:310). Advanced Qualitative Methods in Educational Research — 3 hrs.

Seminar-style course to increase understanding of qualitative research approaches. Focus on mentoring of dissertation projects. Prerequisite(s): INTDEPED 7303 (190:303); INTDEPED 7314; INTDEPED 7316. (Variable)

MEASRES 7330. Advanced Quantitative Research in Education — 3 hrs.

Seminar-style course intended to increase understanding of and ability to carry out quantitative research approaches. Focus on mentoring dissertation projects. Prerequisite(s): INTDEPED 7303 (190:303), INTDEPED 7314, INTDEPED 7316, INTDEPED 7389 (190:389). (Variable)

Postsecondary Education: Student Affairs Courses

POSTSEC 1050 (170:050). Career Decision Making — 2 hrs.

Introduction to a structured career decision-making process, including self-awareness, career and educational information, computerized and Internet assistance and resources, and related activities/projects. (Fall and Spring)

POSTSEC 1055 (170:055). Strategies for Academic Success — 2 hrs.

Provides development and use of effective learning and study strategies/skills necessary for independent learning and academic success. University policies, procedures, and services will be addressed. (Fall and Spring)

POSTSEC 3000. Exploring the Student Affairs Profession — 3 hrs.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of student affairs practice in higher education. This course will introduce undergraduate students to the field of student affairs in the context of higher education. The complex and diverse roles and functions served by student affairs professionals in American higher education are included in this course. Student affairs professionals are educators concerned with the intellectual, social, psychological, spiritual, aesthetic and physical development of the wide range of types of students in postsecondary education. They work collaboratively with students, faculty, staff and administration to foster student learning and development. The course will include introductions to: the history of the field, professional associations, institutional differences, professional and ethical standards, functional areas in higher education, student learning and developmental theory, overview of graduate preparation and current topics. The course is informed by identified values of the student affairs profession, as identified by Reason and Broido: altruism, equality, justice, human dignity, aesthetics, freedom, truth and community. (Fall and Spring)

POSTSEC 3161. Undergraduate Internship in Student Affairs — 3 hrs.

Supervised experience in a postsecondary setting. Course is intended to be as a follow up to the Exploring the Student Affairs Profession course. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): POSTSEC 3000. (Spring)

POSTSEC 6220. Leading, Helping, Advising — 3 hrs.

Provides an overview and skill development in the areas of Leadership, Helping Skills and Advising Strategies. (Fall)

POSTSEC 6231 (170:231). Assessment in Postsecondary Education — 3 hrs.

Examination of topics related to assessment in postsecondary education including benchmarking, program evaluation, student learning and developmental outcomes, student needs, student satisfaction, and campus culture. (Spring)

POSTSEC 6250 (170:250). Teaching in College — 3 hrs.

Examination of issues and problems in college teaching including roles of the college teacher, factors affecting teaching and learning environment, learning theory, course planning, and teaching strategies. (Fall and Spring)

POSTSEC 6256 (170:256). The Two-Year College — 3 hrs.

Provides an understanding of the mission, governance, operation, and student and faculty issues unique to the two-year college in the United States, with particular attention to Iowa. (Spring and Summer)

POSTSEC 6260 (170:260). History of U.S. Higher Education — 3 hrs.

Overview of the historical development, issues, philosophies, and cultural backgrounds of higher education in America. (Fall)

POSTSEC 6264 (170:264). Values, Philosophies and History of Student Affairs — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the field of college/university student services with applications of theory to practice, and including elements of history. (Fall)

POSTSEC 6265. Organizational and Personal Foundations for Student Affairs — 3 hrs.

This course will serve as a follow up to the Values, Philosophies and History of Student Affairs course. Topics covered include the administration of student affairs, history of student affairs and central concepts to the student affairs profession. (Spring)

POSTSEC 6268. Social Justice and Inclusion — 3 hrs.

The student affairs profession maintains a deep commitment to diversity and inclusion. This course will engage learners (both the student and instructor) in the critical reflection and analysis of multicultural theory and social justice advocacy in higher education, with the intent to further integrate them into our research and practice. Moreover, this course aims to equip learners with the skills to bring about positive social change on their campuses, while attending to the needs of the learning community with complex social identities. (Spring)

POSTSEC 6270 (170:270). College Student Development — 3 hrs.

Addresses student development theories (moral, ethical, intellectual, and psychosocial), and their application in student affairs settings. (Spring)

POSTSEC 6271. Portfolio Development — 1 hr.

Independent study preparation of the learning portfolio that constitutes the culmination of the master's program. May be repeated. (Variable)

POSTSEC 6272. College Effects on Students — 3 hrs.

Reviews the research on the effects of higher education on students. Prerequisite(s): admission to Postsecondary Education: Student Affairs program. (Variable)

POSTSEC 6273. Research in Student Affairs — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the basic research literacy necessary for student affairs profession. Prerequisite(s): admission to Postsecondary Education: Student Affairs program. (Fall and Spring)

POSTSEC 6274. Higher Education Law — 3 hrs.

Discusses Federal, State and local law and its impact on higher education. (Fall)

POSTSEC 6285 (170:285). Readings in Postsecondary Education.

(Variable)

POSTSEC 6289 (170:289). Seminar in Postsecondary Education — 3 hrs.

Offered on special topics as determined and scheduled by the department. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): departmental approval required. (Variable)

POSTSEC 6291 (170:291). Internship in Postsecondary Education — 1-6 hrs.

Supervised substantive experience in a postsecondary setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. (Variable)

POSTSEC 6299 (170:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)

POSTSEC 7311 (170:311). Educational Leadership and Systems Change — 3 hrs.

Examination of knowledge base for both change and leadership. Emphasis on understanding how change factors and leadership styles interact to influence receptiveness to and acceptance of change. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status or consent of college. (Same as EDLEAD 7311 (270:311)) (Variable)

POSTSEC 7389 (170:389). Seminar in Postsecondary Education.

Special topics as indicated in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

POSTSEC 7397 (170:397). Practicum: Postsecondary Education — 1-3 hrs.

Advanced orientation and experience for Student Affairs majors in a professional setting. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

Social Foundations Courses

SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119). Schools and American Society — 3 hrs.

This course analyzes the history, sociology, political economy, and philosophical foundations of K-12 education. Its focus is on the societal issues that impact student learning and classroom practice and the political processes that impact public education and the teaching profession. It is designed to cultivate critical thinking about themes pertaining to public schooling through an interdisciplinary lens. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOCFOUND 4134/5134 (260:134g). History of Education — 3 hrs.

This course explores the historical development of the American public education system. Emphasis is placed on the shifting societal and political aims of public education over time; their relationship to broader shifts in American society and politics; and the controversial issues and social movements that have driven educational change. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SOCFOUND 4234/5234. Philosophy of Education — 3 hrs.

This course will survey various approaches and theories of educational philosophy. This will entail questioning common sense assumptions about education, schooling, knowledge, teaching and learning. Through a careful reading of foundational and contemporary texts, students will consider a number of critical issues related to education broadly and the establishment of schooling more specifically Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SOCFOUND 6299 (260:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Variable)