2021-22 Academic Catalog
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Sociology Courses (SOC)

Courses

SOC 1000 (980:001). Introduction to Sociology — 3 hrs.

Why do we do the things we do? Why is our society the way it is? Sociology teaches students to understand human behavior in an increasingly complex and dynamic social world. Students analyze how and why people act, think, and feel the ways they do. Identity, relationships, institutions, social structures, and the sociological perspective are topics covered. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 1060 (980:060). Social Problems — 3 hrs.

Social problems teaches students to analyze a variety of contemporary issues facing groups of people. Students will examine the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to the problems. Topics include topics like poverty, drugs, sex trafficking, discrimination, and mental illness. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 1070. Introduction to Human Rights — 3 hrs.

In recent years, "human rights" has become among the most powerful ways of thinking about and fighting for a more just world. This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concept, a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices with a particular focus on the sociological study of human rights. The course will begin with a study of the foundations of human rights that seeks to answer questions such as "What are human rights?" and "How or why do we have these rights?" Students will investigate the practice of human rights and the political structures that enable us to address human rights violations around the globe with an emphasis on the relationship between the individual and society. Finally, this course will allow students to consider the most salient, and often controversial, contemporary human rights challenges we face today, here in the U.S. and abroad. (Spring)

SOC 2000. The Sociological Career — 3 hrs.

The focus of this course is to help students prepare for a career using their sociology degree. To do this, we will cover issues related to maximizing time as a student on the UNI campus, as well as developing tools to help students pursue their own professional interests. This should encourage students to discover ways of becoming both a life-long learner and a successful professional in the career of their choice. (Fall)

SOC 2010 (980:108). Research Methods — 3 hrs.

Introduction to basic research methods used in social research. Conceptualization and operationalization of research problems. Examination of various research designs used to collect data. Introduction to sampling, instrumentation, data processing, data analysis, and report production. Priority to Sociology and Criminology majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2020 (980:080). Statistics for Social Research — 3 hrs.

Students learn many techniques for working with quantitative data including calculating and visually representing descriptive statistics for categorical and quantitative variables, and conducting hypothesis tests for bivariate and multivariate analyses. We focus on statistical inference, secondary data analysis, and improving data literacy skills for real world applications. Prerequisite(s): completion of mathematics requirement for the Liberal Arts Core. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2030 (980:105g). Sociology of Families — 3 hrs.

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction to the sociology of families. We will explore topics such as families in historical perspective, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, families and work, divorce, and family diversity. Students should leave the course with a basic understanding of the concepts, principles, and methods used to study family experiences from a sociological perspective. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 2040 (980:156g). Social Movements — 3 hrs.

Social movements occur when people break from their ordinary, everyday lives and try to make broad social change. In this survey course we will examine the social, cultural, and political forces that that launch social movements, form the trajectory of movements, and shape counter-movements. We will look at historical and current cases, looking at how social movements are formed, and what makes them successful or unsuccessful. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 2075 (980:100g). Social Psychology — 3 hrs.

Analysis of how people's thoughts, feelings, actions, and identities are influenced by social processes, interactions, and structures. Special attention to how people acquire, construct, and negotiate identities and how they are influenced by social realities of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in these processes. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 3035/5035 (980:125g). Social Gerontology — 3 hrs.

This course explores the social aspects of aging - how do older adults affect society and how does society affect older adults. We will do this by reviewing research on such topics as the demography of aging, aging in historical perspective, social support later in life, living arrangements, work and retirement, health and health care, and caregiving. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3037/5037 (980:045g). Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice — 3 hrs.

The nature, origin, and consequences of race and ethnicity as sources of differentiation and inequality. Examines competing theories, the distribution of resources across groups, and social processes related to race, ethnicity, and social justice. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3045/5045 (980:135g). Social Inequality — 3 hrs.

The nature, origins, and reproduction of social inequalities. Examines the distribution of resources across groups and the processes that create it. Covers class, race, gender, and sexuality, and their relationship to each other. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3050/5050 (980:129g). Men and Masculinities — 3 hrs.

Examination of men's lives from boys to men in such roles as friends, lovers, co-workers, family members, students, athletes, consumers, and soldiers. Consideration of diversities of male experiences through such categories as race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexual orientation, age, physical ability, and appearance. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3060/5060 (980:138g). Sociology of Culture — 3 hrs.

This class illustrates how the economy and personal taste can be connected, so that we feel like we must prefer some cultural forms over others. Students will learn how to find meaning in a variety of cultural forms through exploration and critical analysis. Topics include conspicuous consumption, leisure, subcultures, and celebrity culture. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SOC 2010 (980:108). (Variable)

SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g). Sociological Theory — 3 hrs.

An overview of classical and contemporary social theory. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Spring)

SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g). Immigration and Transnationalism — 3 hrs.

Comparative multi-disciplinary perspective on international migration and immigrant settlement strategies, with a focus on Western Europe and the United States. Topics cover the main theoretical and contemporary debates within the field of international migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. [Same as ANTH 3080/5080 (990:120g)] (Variable)

SOC 3086/5086. Medical Sociology — 3 hrs.

Medical sociology is a broad field of study that uses sociological theories and methods to investigate the social causes and consequences of health and illness across the life course. This class examines: the social determinants of physical and mental health, disease, and mortality; health-seeking behaviors; doctor-patient interactions; health care providers; complementary and alternative medicine; health care systems domestically and globally; health care policy; and ethics. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) OR SOC 1060; consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3087/5087. Society and Mental Illness — 3 hrs.

Mental illness is an individual and social experience. In this class, we use sociological theories and methods to examine how definitions of mental illness changed over time, place, and cultural context. We investigate the social patterning of mental illness by race and ethnicity, social class, sex, and age, and how mental illness tends to cluster among those with the fewest resources. We consider the roles of stress, trauma, discrimination, and systems of social support. We critically analyze individual and social barriers to treatment, such as stigma, legal problems, and mental health public policy in the U.S. and abroad. Throughout the course we learn how sociologists work with other social scientists and medical professionals identifying the social causes and consequences of mental illness for individuals and society. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3179 (980:179). Cooperative Education — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in cooperation with the Cooperative Education office. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head and Cooperative Education office. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4005/5005. Refugees and Humanitarianism — 3 hrs.

Refugees and Humanitarianism is meant to provoke passionate concern for the real-world consequences of refugee aid and measured social scientific thinking about how to respond to the challenges of humanitarian crisis in our "second-best world." This class explores the social and political challenges of living as a refugee and working in humanitarian settings, with a focus on refugee camps and the institutional development of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. How did refugee camps become the primary means to administer sanctuary? What are the consequences of this? The class also explores the outcomes refugees face when they are processed through the UN framework of durable solutions as well as alternative approaches to refuge. Topics include causes of flight and exile, the human rights of refugees and internally displaced persons, camp security, health, and environment, as well as contemporary solutions to forced migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4015/5015 (980:178g). Qualitative Research — 3 hrs.

This course is a first introduction to qualitative methods used in sociology and the social sciences. Students will learn participant observation, interviewing and ethnography skills, as well as analysis of material culture, visual sociology, oral history, analysis of documents and other forms of text, including the ambiguous online ethnography. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 4015/5015 (990:178g)) (Variable)

SOC 4025/5025 (980:160g). Quantitative Research — 3 hrs.

In this course, students will become more familiar with the steps involved in conducting a quantitative research project, with an emphasis on survey research. The focus is on developing skills related to forming research questions and hypotheses guided by theory and prior research, collecting data, conducting data analysis, and interpreting and presenting results. This will increase understanding of how to conduct quantitative research and present it in a scholarly manner. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); SOC 2010 (980:108) or equivalent; SOC 2020 (980:080) or equivalent; completion of LAC mathematics requirement; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4036/5036. Program and Policy Evaluation — 3 hrs.

This course engages students on how social science methodologies can be applied to program and policy evaluation. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); SOC 2020 (980:080); or consent of the instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4051/5051. Sociology of Gender — 3 hrs.

Through an intersectional lens, students examine gender as a social, cultural, and institutional construction. Students will explore how gender influences social life within major social institutions such as media, family, the workplace, schools, religion, politics, and popular culture. Focus on US but also comparative. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4052/5052. Childhood Inequalities — 3 hrs.

In this course, we use sociological theories and research methods to critically analyze the social and structural forces that influence child development and the social construction of childhood. We pay careful attention to social, cultural, legal, familial, and societal processes that lead to unequal childhoods and perpetuate social problems such as the school-to-prison pipeline, medicalizing child emotions and behaviors, childhood poverty and hunger, child abuse, neglect, and trauma, and the separation and detention of children from their migrant families. Throughout the course, we use a sociological perspective to understand the problems children face and what can be done to reduce childhood inequalities. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Fall)

SOC 4053. Social Justice Seminar — 3 hrs.

The Social Justice seminar is the culminating class for the Social Justice Minor. Students will implement what they have learned throughout the minor into an applied term project where students work on a specific social justice issue. This course will cover social justice organizing and practice across a range of social institutions. Students will engage with questions of defining social justice and its relation to other concepts, such as diversity, equity, inclusion, culture, identity, and respect. Issues in Social Justice research, movements, theory, and human rights will be used as case studies for students to critically examine contemporary social issues, events, policies and practice. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); 6 hours from the following: SOC 3037/5037 (980:045g), SOC 3060/5060 (980:138g), SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g), SOC 3086/5086, SOC 3087/5087, SOC 4005/5005, SOC 4051/5051, or consent of instructor. (Odd Springs)

SOC 4071/5071 (980:171g). Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences — 3 hrs.

Survey of theoretical approaches to study of sex and gender. Classical, structural, neo-Freudian, Marxist feminist, and radical approaches. Topics include work, family, religion, and sexuality. Prerequisite(s): SOC SCI 1020 (900:020) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011) or WGS 1040 (680:040); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4198 (980:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

SOC 4485. Sociology Internship — 1-3 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in a sociology-related agency or position. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Intended for sociology majors. May be repeated for maximum three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of SOC 4485 or SOC 4585 may count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology (SOC xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher, junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4499/5499. Seminar in Sociology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics; opportunity to correlate previous course work and knowledge in field of sociology. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108) or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4500/5500. Theory and Practice in Applied Settings — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in sociology. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4501/5501. Research Experience in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

Research participation and/or independent supervised research. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4502/5502. Readings in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated only with consent of department. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in sociology; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4585. Practical Field Experience — 1-3 hrs.

Designed for students currently working in in an sociology-related agency or position. Provides an opportunity for students to apply academic material to their current jobs in sociology or a related field. Intended for sociology majors. May be repeated for maximum three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of SOC 4485 or SOC 4585 may count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology (SOC xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 6299 (980:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)