2018-19 Academic Catalog
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Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services

 (College of Education)

 www.uni.edu/coe/hpels

Effective July 1, 2018 the School of Kinesiology, Allied Health and Human Services restructured into two departments - the Department of Kinesiology and the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services.

The Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs and program certificates. Specific requirements for these programs are listed within the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services, in the following order. (Note: The Doctor of Education Intensive Study Area in Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services is under the College of Education and is listed below.)

College of Education -

  • Graduate Major (Ed.D.)
    • Doctor of Education: Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services intensive study area (to view all Doctor of Education requirements on the website go to www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation or for PDF version  go to "College of Education" under "Interdisciplinary" section)

Interdisciplinary -

  • Undergraduate Major (B.A.)
    • Environmental Resource Management (also listed in Department of Biology, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Department of Geography)

Athletic Training -

  • Undergraduate Major (B.A.)
    • Athletic Training and Rehabilitation Studies
  • Masters of Athletic Training (M.ATR.)

Health Promotion and Education -

  • Undergraduate Major (B.A.)
    • Health Promotion
  • Minors
    • Health Education-Teaching
    • Health Promotion
  • Graduate Major (M.A.)
    • Health Education
  • Program Certificates
    • Environmental Health
    • Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance

Leisure, Youth and Human Services -

  • Undergraduate Major (B.A.)
    • Leisure, Youth and Human Services
  • Minor
    • Leisure, Youth and Human Services
  • Graduate Major (M.A.)
    • Leisure, Youth and Human Services
  • Program Certificates
    • Aquatics Specialization (also listed in Department of Kinesiology)
    • Nonprofit Management
    • Outdoor Recreation
    • School-Age Care Leadership
    • Tourism

Doctor of Education

(For all requirements see website www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation - for PDF version see listing for "College of Education" under the "Interdisciplinary" section of this university catalog.)

Students interested in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the appropriate Intensive Study Area (ISA) for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admission to the program.

This program is intended to provide practicing educators, in formal and nonformal settings, the opportunity to continue their study and earn the terminal professional degree in their field. The Ed.D. degree requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit beyond the master's degree There are three components to the program:

Professional Common Core (work in educational foundations, fundamentals, and research)27
Advanced Professional Study (in one of three areas of intensive study)27
Dissertation6
Total Hours60

By design, all students are required to study in basic areas that undergird and define educational practice and develop skills of problem definition, data collection and analysis, and interpretation. The three areas of intensive study provide for a specialized focus on practice. The three intensive study areas (ISAs) are:

  • Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Leadership

Note: Students interested in special education with the Curriculum and Instruction ISA or the Educational Leadership ISA should consult the respective ISA descriptions for further information.

In some areas, it is possible to combine doctoral degree study with work toward an endorsement to perform a particular role in K-12 education.

Brief definitions of the three ISAs follows:

Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services

This area of intensive study is designed to provide students with advanced planning, management, supervision and evaluation of programs in the community and its institutions. The combined areas of allied health, recreation and community services are diverse professional areas knitted together by a unified commitment to enhancing, enriching and sustaining individual well-being and quality of life. Each of these areas contributes unique and different professional perspectives, yet, at the same time, focuses on the individual and collective well-being of people, communities and society as a whole. Graduates are prepared for careers as applied scholars, evaluators, athletic administration, administrators of community nonprofit organizations, youth serving agencies, public parks and recreation agencies, foundations, and government agencies. The program of study will be based upon student's needs, interests, and upon approval by an academic advisor and program of study committee. (For more information, contact the Chair of Leisure, Youth and Human Services, Health Promotion and Education, or the Athletic Training in the Department of Health, Recreation, and Community Services.)

Curriculum and Instruction

This area of intensive study is designed to prepare scholar practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children, from infancy through adolescence, and adult learners, inclusive of a wide variety of diversity. Faculty in this intensive study area come from many departments and disciplines, including but not limited to prekindergarten through tertiary curriculum and pedagogy; foundations of education in psychology, philosophy, social sciences; disability studies, gifted and talented, and multicultural education; literacy education; instructional technology, school library studies; and P-12 content areas such as mathematics, physical education, science, social studies, and language arts. Students interested in becoming special education scholar-practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children and adult learners with an emphasis on inclusion and diversity will apply for admission through the Curriculum and Instruction Intensive Study Area. For more information see www.uni.edu/coe/departments/curriculum-instruction/graduate-study/doctoral-study.

Educational Leadership

This area of intensive study in education administration prepares personnel for leadership positions in PK-12 schools, post-secondary institutions, and other educational services or settings. Typical positions held by educators with the terminal degree focused on educational leadership include: principals, superintendents, school district central office administrators, professors of educational leadership, special education directors at the Area Education Agency level or Department of Education administrators and consultants. Students interested in special education administration will apply for admission through Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education. (For more information, contact the Head, Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education, or please see the catalog at www.uni.edu/catalog.uni.edu/collegeofeducation/educationalleadershipandpostsecondaryeducation or visit the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education website at www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education.

Interdisciplinary

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program

Environmental Resource Management Major

The Environmental Resource Management major is aimed at students searching for career options in the broadly-defined 'outdoor environment' that are related to natural resources, environmental systems, and sustainable development. This program will prepare students for careers in the environmental and human management of public and private spaces across differing categories of environmental systems - from public parks and lands to conservancy units managed by governmental and other non-profit agencies and organizations. This program aims to serve those students who do not wish to pursue careers as environmental scientists per se from more tightly focused 'environmental science' programs.

  • STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THE CORE REQUIREMENTS (31 HOURS) AND MAY CHOOSE ONLY ONE OF THE FOUR SPECIALIZATION TRACKS (30-32 HOURS).
  • Each track is composed of clusters of courses with a specific concentration, each of which has a separate hourly requirement.
  • For purposes of this degree program, those prerequisite courses required by BIOL, EARTHSCI, GEOG, and KAHHS for mid/upper-level courses in each Track THAT ARE NOT INCLUDED IN THE CORE REQUIREMENTS will normally be waived by the appropriate departments.
  • The separate tracks allow students to specialize in the area of most general interest while the primary & secondary foci within each track make sure students also are exposed to a wide range of important auxiliary coursework.
  • By permission of the Provost’s Office, students enrolled in the B.A. Environmental Resource Management major will be considered majors in all four of the participating departments.
Core Requirements
BIOL 2051 (840:051)General Biology: Organismal Diversity4
BIOL 3100 (840:100)Evolution, Ecology and the Nature of Science *3
CHEM 1110 (860:044)General Chemistry I4
EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031)Introduction to Geology4
or
Physical Geography
and Physical Geography Laboratory
EARTHSCI 3330/5330 (870:141g)Geomorphology4
GEOG 4260Environmental Resource Management3
GEOG 3310 (970:164)Geographic Information Systems I3
LYHS 4055 (430:151)Financial Resource Management for LYHS Agencies3
HISUS 4170/5170U.S. Environmental History3
Total Hours31
*

For students pursuing the Environmental Resource Management B.A. degree, the Department of Biology will waive the BIOL 2052 (840:052) and CHEM 1120 (860:048) prerequisites for enrollment into BIOL 3100 (840:100).

Encouraged Certificates: Certificate programs that are appropriate to couple with the ERM major and help to expand specific, relevant experiences for students.

    - GIS & Cartography (Dept. of Geography)

    - Sustainability (Interdisciplinary)

    - Outdoor Recreation (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Tourism (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Nonprofit Management Certificate (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Environmental Health Certificate (Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services)

    - Public History (Dept. of History)

Ecosystems Track

A total of 32 hours are needed for this track. There are 12 hours of required courses. In addition, student select courses from all three elective categories (A, B, & C) to accumulate to a minimum of 20 hours. At least one course must be taken from each elective category.

Required
BIOL 4168/5168 (840:168g)Ecology **4
CHEM 1120 (860:048)General Chemistry II4
MATH 1140 (800:046)Precalculus4
Electives:20
Category A - Content Management Related Courses (pick at least 1 course)
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Biodiversity Conservation Policy **
Conservation Biology **
Restoration Ecology **
Category B - Content Related Courses (pick at least 1 course)
Invertebrate Zoology *
Marine Biology *
Entomology *
Aquatic Ecology **
Biostatistics **
Mammalogy **
Plant Systematics **
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)
Geographic Information Systems II
Category C - Cognates (pick at least 1 course)
Elements of Weather
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers ^
Recent Climate Change
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental Geography ^
Natural Regions of North America
Climatology
Soils and Landscapes
Reconstructing Ice Age Environments ^
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
Remote Sensing of the Environment
History of Outdoor Recreation
Principles of Tourism
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Leadership Skills ^
Project Management ^
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Total Hours32
*

 * For students pursuing the Environmental Resource Management B.A. degree, the Department of Biology will waive BIOL 2052 (840:052) and CHEM 1120 (860:048) for BIOL 3000-level courses.

**

 ** For students pursuing the Environmental Resource Management B.A. degree, the Department of Biology will waive BIOL 3140 (840:140) as a prerequisite for BIOL 4000-level courses.

^

 ^ These courses have additional prerequisites as follows:

ENGLISH 4785/5785 (620:177g) has prerequisites of ENGLISH 2770 (620:077) and one of the following - INSTTECH 4170/5170 (240:170g), ART 3030 (600:125), ENGLISH 4765/5765 (620:102g), ENGLISH 4770/5770 (620:104g), ENGLISH 4775/5775 (620:105g), ENGLISH 4780/5780 (620:107g) or consent of instructor; junior standing.

GEOG 3220 (970:100) has a prerequisite of GEOG 1120 (970:010) or GEOG 1210 (970:026) or GEOG 2210 (970:028) or GEOG 1110 (970:040) or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4240/5240 (970:155g) has prerequisites of GEOG 1210 (970:026); GEOG 2210 (970:028); EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031); or consent of instructor; junior standing.

MGMT 3183 and MGMT 3185 has a prerequisite of MGMT 3153 (150:153).

GEOG 3179 (970:179) has prerequisites of 15 hours of geography at UNI; cumulative GPA of 2.50; junior standing; consent of department.

LYHS 4095 (430:187) has prerequisites of senior standing; consent of Internship Coordinator and a corequisite of LYHS 4090 (430:184).

HPE 4768 (410:168) has prerequisites of HPE 3693 (410:193); senior standing; 2.50 cumulative GPA; consent of Health Promotion and Education Coordinator of Student Field Experiences.


Geosystems Track

A total of 30 hours are needed for this track, with a minimum of 21 hours from the Primary Focus group and 9 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Electives
Primary Focus - Content Related Courses21
Environmental Hydrology ^
Earth Materials ^
Recent Climate Change
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental Geography * ^
or
Environmental Geology ***
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Climatology
Elements of Weather
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Principles of Nonprofit Organizations
Secondary Focus - Management Cognates9
Wildlife Ecology and Management **
Restoration Ecology **
Sedimentary Geology ****
Field and Laboratory Methods in Hydrology
Environmental Economics ^
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers ^
Natural Regions of North America
Regional Analysis and Planning
Reconstructing Ice Age Environments *
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic) ^
Geographic Information Systems II ^
History of Outdoor Recreation
History of Outdoor Recreation
Principles of Tourism
Eco, Adventure and Sport Tourism #
Project Management ^
Public Budgeting ^
Cooperative Education ^
Cooperative Education in Geography
Internship
Internship
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours30
*

 * For students pursuing the Geosystems Track, the Geography Department will accept GEOG 1210 (970:026) and GEOG 1211 or EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031) as the prerequisite for enrollment into all listed Geography courses except GEOG 4310/5310 (970:170g) and GEOG 4320/5320 (970:174g).

**

 ** The Biology Department will waive BIOL 3140 (840:140) as a prerequisite for BIOL 4105/5105 (840:105g) and BIOL 4180/5180 (840:180g).

***

 *** The Earth and Environmental Sciences Department will accept GEOG 1210 (970:026) and GEOG 1211 as substitutes for courses that require EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031).

****

 **** The Earth and Environmental Sciences Department will waive the requirement of EARTHSCI 1320 (870:035) for EARTHSCI 3325/5325 (870:136g).

#

 # The Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services will waive LYHS 2770 (430:070) as a prerequisite for LYHS 4776/5776 (430:170g).

^

 ^ These courses have additional prerequisites as follows:

EARTHSCI 3322 has a prerequisite of EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031).

EARTHSCI 3350/5350 (870:173g) has prerequisites of EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031); junior standing.

GEOG 3220 (970:100) has a prerequisite of GEOG 1120 (970:010) or GEOG 1210 (970:026) or GEOG 2210 (970:028) or GEOG 1110 (970:040) or consent of instructor.

ECON 3225/5225 (920:123g) has prerequisites of ECON 1041 (920:053), ECON 1051 (920:054); junior standing.

ENGLISH 4785/5785 (620:177g) has prerequisites of ENGLISH 2770 (620:077); one of the following courses - INSTTECH 4170/5170 (240:170g), ART 3030 (600:125), ENGLISH 4765/5765 (620:102g), ENGLISH 4770/5770 (620:104g), ENGLISH 4775/5775 (620:105g), ENGLISH 4780/5780 (620:107g), or consent of instructor; junior standing.

GEOG 4310/5310 (970:170g) has prerequisites of GEOG 3310 (970:164); junior standing.

GEOG 4320/5320 (970:174g) has prerequisites of GEOG 3310 (970:164) or consent of instructor; junior standing.

MGMT 3185 has a prerequisite of MGMT 3153 (150:153).

POL AMER 3172/5172 (942:172) has prerequisites of POL AMER 1014 (942:014); POL AMER 1048 (942:048).

GEOG 3179 (970:179) has prerequisites of 15 hours of geography at UNI; cumulative GPA of 2.50; junior standing; consent of department.

LYHS 4095 (430:187) has prerequisites of senior standing; consent of Internship Coordinator and a corequisite of LYHS 4090 (430:184).

HPE 4768 (410:168) has prerequisites of HPE 3693 (410:193); senior standing; 2.50 cumulative GPA; consent of Health Promotion and Education Coordinator of Student Field Experiences.

Resource Administration Track

A total of 30 hours are needed for this track, with a minimum of 21 hours from the Primary Focus group and 9 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Primary Focus - Content Related Courses21
Recent Climate Change
Regional Analysis and Planning
Natural Hazards and Disasters
Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations
Principles of Nonprofit Organizations
Human Resource Development for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Areas and Facilities for Leisure, Youth and Human Services **
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
History of Outdoor Recreation
Eco, Adventure and Sport Tourism ^
Secondary Focus - Cognates9
Conservation Biology **
Natural Regions of North America
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Climatology
Laboratory Methods in Environmental Geography
GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)
Geographic Information Systems II
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Applied Writing: Technical Communication ^
Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers
Environmental Health Science
Principles of Tourism
Theory and Practice of Experiential Education
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Community Planning Workshop
Project Management ^
Public Budgeting ^
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours30
*

 * The Biology Department will waive BIOL 3140 (840:140) as a prerequisite for BIOL 4167/5167 (840:167g).

**

 ** The Geography Department and the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services will waive LYHS 3060 (430:110) as a prerequisite for enrollment into LYHS 4115/5115 (430:168g).

^

 ^ These courses have additional prerequisites as follows:

LYHS 4776/5776 (430:170g) has prerequisites of LYHS 2770 (430:070) or consent of instructor; junior standing.

ENGLISH 4775/5775 (620:105g) has prerequisites of MGMT 2080 (150:080) or ENGLISH 2770 (620:077) or consent of instructor; junior standing.

ENGLISH 4785/5785 (620:177g) has prerequisites of ENGLISH 2770 (620:077); one of the following courses - INSTTECH 4170/5170 (240:170g), ART 3030 (600:125), ENGLISH 4765/5765 (620:102g), ENGLISH 4770/5770 (620:104g), ENGLISH 4775/5775 (620:105g), ENGLISH 4780/5780 (620:107g), or consent of instructor; junior standing.

MGMT 3185 has a prerequisite of MGMT 3153 (150:153).

POL AMER 3172/5172 (942:172) has prerequisites of POL AMER 1014 (942:014); POL AMER 1048 (942:048).

GEOG 3179 (970:179) has prerequisites of 15 hours of geography at UNI; cumulative GPA of 2.50; junior standing; consent of department.

LYHS 4095 (430:187) has prerequisites of senior standing; consent of Internship Coordinator and a corequisite of LYHS 4090 (430:184).

HPE 4768 (410:168) has prerequisites of HPE 3693 (410:193); senior standing; 2.50 cumulative GPA; consent of Health Promotion and Education Coordinator of Student Field Experiences.

Environmental Compliance Track

A total of 32 hours need for this focus area, with 15 hours of required courses, a minimum of 10 hours from the Primary Focus group and 7 hours from the Secondary Focus group.

Required
ECON 1041 (920:053)Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 1051 (920:054)Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 3225/5225 (920:123g)Environmental Economics3
HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g)Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations3
PHIL 2550Environmental Ethics3
Primary Focus - Content Related Courses10
Elements of Weather
Introduction to Environmental Earth Science
Air Quality ^
Environmental Geology *
or
Environmental Geography
Environmental Hydrology *
Secondary Focus - Cognates7
Air Quality Modeling ^
Measurement and Analysis of Air Quality ** ^
Sedimentary Geology ***
Hydrogeology *
Soils and Landscapes
Rivers
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Environmental Health Science
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Organizational Management *
Project Management ^
Introduction to Public Administration
Cooperative Education in Geography ^
Cooperative Education
Internship
Internship
Field Experience in Health Promotion
Other courses as approved by advisors and program director
Total Hours32
*

 * The Earth and Environmental Sciences Department will accept GEOG 1210 (970:026) and GEOG 1211 as a substitute for courses that require EARTHSCI 1300 (870:031).

**

 ** The Earth and Environmental Sciences Department will waive EARTHSCI 3230/5230 (870:123g) as a prerequisite for enrollment into EARTHSCI 3240/5240 (870:124g) and EARTHSCI 3250/5250 (870:177g).

***

 *** The Earth and Environmental Sciences Department will waive the requirement for EARTHSCI 1320 (870:035) for EARTHSCI 3325/5325 (870:136g).

^

 ^ These courses have additional prerequisites as follows:

EARTHSCI 3230/5230 (870:123g) has prerequisites of EARTHSCI 1200 (870:021); junior standing.

GEOG 3220 (970:100) has a prerequisite of GEOG 1120 (970:010) or GEOG 1210 (970:026) or GEOG 2210 (970:028) or GEOG 1110 (970:040) or consent of instructor.

EARTHSCI 3240/5240 (870:124g) has prerequisites of EARTHSCI 1200 (870:021); junior standing.

EARTHSCI 3250/5250 (870:177g) has prerequisites of EARTHSCI 1200 (870:021); junior standing and a prerequisite or corequisite of EARTHSCI 3230/5230 (870:123g).

MGMT 3185 has a prerequisite of MGMT 3153 (150:153).

GEOG 3179 (970:179) has prerequisites of 15 hours of geography at UNI; cumulative GPA of 2.50; junior standing; consent of department.

LYHS 4095 (430:187) has prerequisites of senior standing; consent of Internship Coordinator and a corequisite of LYHS 4090 (430:184).

HPE 4768 (410:168) has prerequisites of HPE 3693 (410:193); senior standing; 2.50 cumulative GPA; consent of Health Promotion and Education Coordinator of Student Field Experiences.

 

Athletic Training

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program

Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies Major

The Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

The Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies major is designed to prepare students to become healthcare professionals.  The curriculum prepares students for entry into professional healthcare programs.  The curriculum is based upon cognitive and psychomotor learning experiences.

All students should first indicate their interest in majoring in the Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies major any time after their general admission to UNI is complete by submitting the "Declaration of Curriculum" form, and indicating Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies major. Then, students should contact the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services Academic Advisor.

All program information is available at the athletic training program office (003 HPC) or our Web site www.uni.edu/athletic-training.

Required Core
Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies:
Introduction to Athletic Training and Applied Health Care
Clinical Anatomy
Acute Care in Athletic Training
Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology I
Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology II
Foundations of Pharmacology
AT 3186 (Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience, minimum 1 hour, but may be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours over 4-6 semesters)
AT 3186 (Studies in Health Care Organization & Professional Responsibility, 3 hrs.)
AT 3186 (Studies in Foundations of Therapeutic Interventions, 3 hrs.)
Biology:
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function
Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 3101 Anatomy and Physiology I prerequisites are not required for Athletic Training majors.
Anatomy and Physiology II
Chemistry & Biochemistry
General Chemistry I *
Physics:
General Physics I *
Mathematics:
Introduction to Statistical Methods *
Major Electives (select a minimum of 9 hours from the following):
Global Service Mission **
Minority Health
Nutrition for Health Promotion
International Health
Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions
Introduction to Public Health
Introductory Biomechanics **
Physiology of Exercise **
Sports Nutrition **
Total Hours56
*

 * Satisfactory score on ALEKS exam required for CHEM 1110 (860:044), PHYSICS 1511 (880:054), and STAT 1772 (800:072).

**

 ** These courses have additional prerequisites as follows:

HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g) has a prerequisite of HPE 4167/5167 (410:167g).

PEMES 3151 (420:151) has a prerequisite of PEMES 2050 (420:050).

PEMES 3153 (420:153) has a prerequisite of either PEMES 2050 (420:050) or AT 3020.

PEMES 3157 (420:157) has a prerequisite of AT 3020.

Masters of Athletic Training Degree

Academic Standard Policy

Major Requirements

General Explanation: UNI offers a Professional Graduate Athletic Training major or a Masters of Athletic Training. Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) is being pursued. Students interested in pursuing this major must apply and be formally admitted to this program. Students should apply for the Masters of Athletic Training program through the Office of Admissions and through ATCAS. Program admission is based on undergraduate GPA, completion of prerequisite courses, program application materials, completion of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), and admission to the Graduate College. Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact Athletic Training (within the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services) for program application materials or for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate study admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. Applications will begin to be reviewed October 1 of each year.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

  1. Prerequisite courses required: A Bachelor’s degree must be earned prior to entry into the Masters of Athletic Training. Additional prerequisite undergraduate courses (or equivalent) include: General Biology: Cell Structure & Function, General Chemistry I, Physics I, Statistics, Developmental Psychology OR Abnormal Psychology, Anatomy and Physiology I & II with a laboratory components, and Introduction to Athletic Training & Applied Health Care. Additionally, students need to be First Aid and CPR certified prior to beginning the Masters of Athletic Training program.  A grade of a C or better must be attained in all prerequisite courses.  All pre-requisite courses must have been completed within last 10 years.
  2. Application requirements for all students: To be admitted to the UNI Masters of Athletic Training Program, students must complete the application process. The following list of items are required as part of the application process.
    1. Achieved a bachelor's degree
    2. Completion of course prerequisites as listed above
    3. Application forms: UNI Admissions Office and Athletic Training via ATCAS (online national centralized application system)
    4. CPR certification for the Professional Rescuer
    5. First Aid Certification
    6. 50 hours of athletic training observation experience
    7. OSHA/Blood-borne pathogen certification (This must be obtained before beginning any clinical experience. This training is offered free of charge at UNI every semester.)
    8. Technical standards form
    9. Criminal background check ($15)
    10. Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater
    11. HIPAA Privacy Training
    12. Personal statement
    13. GRE score
    14. Three letters of recommendation
  3. Application Process:
    1. Obtain the application documents from the Admissions website, and ATCAS
    2. Submit all materials to Graduate Admissions
    3. Students must be admitted prior to the beginning of the summer session in order to join that year's cohort.
  4. A committee of faculty, staff, and students will be assigned to the acceptance committee and will review the applications.
  5. Notification of admittance will be made around mid-March of each year.
  6. Upon acceptance into the Masters of Athletic Training program, a student must do the following within 30 days of notification of acceptance:
    1. Send a letter of acceptance via email to the Athletic Training Graduate Program Director.
    2. Begin the Hepatitis B Vaccination series or sign the waiver form.
    3. Complete all other paper work available at the AT program office.
    4. Maintain current CPR, OSHA, and First Aid certifications and child mandatory reporter training.
    5. Become a student member of the NATA ($80/year)
    6. Maintain professional liability insurance ($38/year)
  7. To graduate from UNI with a Masters of Athletic Training major, students must:
    1. Maintain a 3.00 cumulative GPA and 3.00 major GPA
    2. Complete a clinical experience each semester
    3. Complete the Masters of Athletic Training academic major. This includes that a student be enrolled in the athletic training program for a minimum of four semesters.
  8. All other program information is available at the athletic training program office (003 HPC) or our Web site www.uni.edu/athletic-training.

Athletic Training Major

The Masters of Athletic Training major requires a minimum of 60 total hours to graduate.

The Masters of Athletic Training major is designed to prepare students to become athletic training professionals. It prepares students for the Board of Certification Examination as well as eligibility for an Athletic Training State License Credential. The curriculum is based upon cognitive and psychomotor learning experiences. The athletic training program is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This degree is offered on the non-thesis option. Acceptable non-thesis projects include critically appraised topics, interrelated series of research proposals, conducting an empirical study, or a problem-based analysis of the literature, each of which require an extensive writing component.

A minimum of 60 semester credit hours is required. The non-thesis option requires 3 hours of AT 6299 (42T:299). A minimum of 21 semester hours at the 6000-level is required.

A cumulative grade index of 3.00 (B average) must be earned in all courses required for the degree or applying to the degree. No more than six (6) semester hours of C credit (C+, C, C-) may be applied toward credit for graduation. When C-range grades on the advisement report exceed the six hour limit, one or more of such courses must be repeated. A course taken to satisfy degree requirements in which a student receives a D+, D, D- F or NC grade will not be considered satisfactory and must be repeated. The original grade for any repeated course will be included in the computation for the Plan GPA, as well as in the overall cumulative GPA.

Prerequisite Core:28
AT 1010 (42T:023)Introduction to Athletic Training and Applied Health Care (or equivalent)2
BIOL 2052 (840:052)General Biology: Cell Structure and Function4
BIOL 3101 (840:101)Anatomy and Physiology I (or equivalent)4
BIOL 3102 (840:102)Anatomy and Physiology II (or equivalent)4
CHEM 1110 (860:044)General Chemistry I4
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054)General Physics I4
STAT 1772 (800:072)Introduction to Statistical Methods3
PSYCH 2202 (400:120)Developmental Psychology3
or PSYCH 3403/5403 (400:142g) Abnormal Psychology
Athletic Training Courses:
AT 6000Integrated Clinical Experiences (minimum 11 hours, but may be repeated for a maximum of 13 hours over 4-6 semesters)11-13
AT 6030Advanced Acute Care in Athletic Training3
AT 6032Advanced Acute Care Clinical Skills1
AT 6060Athletic Training Organization & Professional Responsibility 3
AT 6070Advanced Therapeutic Interventions I3
AT 6072Advanced Therapeutic Interventions I Clinical Skills1
AT 6080Advanced Therapeutic Interventions II3
AT 6082Advanced Therapeutic Interventions II Clinical Skills1
AT 6100Advanced Clinical Anatomy 3
AT 6130General Medical Assessment & Referral3
AT 6150Advanced Athletic Training Clinical Skills2
AT 6210 (42T:210)Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment I3
AT 6215Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment I Clinical Skills1
AT 6220 (42T:220)Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment II3
AT 6225Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment II Clinical Skills1
AT 6255Preventative Health Techniques3
AT 6260 (42T:250)Orthopaedic Surgical Interventions3
AT 6275Mental Health Care in Athletic Training Practice3
Kinesiology, Allied Health, & Human Services, Interdepartmental: 6 credits
KAHHS 6210Quantitative Methods in KAHHS3
KAHHS 6290Research Methods for KAHHS3
Research: 3 credit hours (Non-thesis)
AT 6299 Research3
Total hours60-62

Health Promotion and Education

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

Health Promotion Major 

The Health Promotion major  requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. Liberal Arts Core courses included in major program requirements are distinguished by italics.

Accreditation/Credentialing Areas include the following:

Wellness and Fitness (54 hours)

Women's Health (52 hours)

Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance (51 hours)

Environmental Health: Science Intensive (54-55 hours)

Community Nutrition Track (47 hours)

Health Promotion specialists seek to improve the health of the general public through education, behavior change and improvement of the environment. Students in the program develop the skills to plan, implement and evaluate programs in a variety of settings, which may include health departments, corporate wellness sites, hospitals/clinics, fitness facilities, nonprofit organizations, international relief organizations, nursing homes, colleges/universities and private industry.

The curriculum is tailored to meet national competencies and prepares students to sit for the National Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam or the Registered Environmental Health Specialist (REHS) exam.  Students will take classes on public health theory, anatomy, human diseases, environmental health science, epidemiology (how diseases are spread,) and how to address risky lifestyle behaviors (i.e., tobacco/alcohol/substance abuse, lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, intentional and unintentional injuries, high levels of stress, and unsafe sexual behaviors.)

A minimum 2.50 GPA will be required for admission to HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion. Successful completion of  HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar and a minimum of 2.50 GPA will be required for admission. A student declaring a major in Health Promotion will complete the core plus one accreditation/credentialing area. All students are encouraged to meet with their faculty advisor to discuss their career goals and aspirations. To graduate with a major in Health Promotion a student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 in all course work taken at UNI or transferred from another institution.

A student may declare more than one credentialing area within the Health Promotion major. The Environmental Health credentialing area requires 3 hours HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion; the remaining credentialing areas of Wellness and Fitness, Women's Health, Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance, and Community Nutrition require 9 hours HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion. If a student does choose the Environmental Health credentialing area and another credentialing area, those students will complete 3 hours of field experience in Environmental Health and 6 hours in their other credentialing area. Students should speak with their advisor regarding this.

 Required common core for all areas:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 1101 (410:005)Introduction to Public Health2
HPE 3693 (410:193)Internship Seminar3
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g)Human Diseases3
HPE 4393/5393Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g)Environmental Health Science3
HPE 4768 (410:168)Field Experience in Health Promotion3-9
(HPE 4768 (410:168) - 3 hrs. for Environmental Health area: 9 hrs. for other areas)
Total Hours17-23
Choose one of the following five accreditation/credentialing areas:
Accreditation/Credentialing Area - Wellness and Fitness
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 3118 (410:118)Teaching Aerobics1
HPE 4155 (410:155g)Stress Management2
HPE 4164 (410:164g)Health Care and the Consumer2
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g)Public Health Theory3
HPE 4373/5373Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs4
HPE 4383/5383Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy4
HPE 4431/5431 (410:131g)Worksite Health Promotion3
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g)Nutrition for Health Promotion3
Physical Education:
PEMES 2050 (420:050)Anatomy and Physiology of Human Movement3
PEMES 3153 (420:153)Physiology of Exercise3
PEMES 3156 (420:156)Fitness Assessment and Programming3
Total hours for Health and Fitness Promotion Area54
Accreditation/Credentialing Area - Women's Health
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 2120 (410:020)Maternal and Infant Health3
HPE 4162/5162 (410:162g)Introduction to Women's Health3
HPE 4328/5328 (410:128g)Selected Topics in Women's Health3
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g)Public Health Theory3
HPE 4373/5373Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs4
HPE 4383/5383Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy4
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g)Nutrition for Health Promotion3
Electives (6 hours from the following):6
Family Services:
Human Relationships and Sexuality
Parenting (^)
Human Sexuality Education (^)
Psychology:
Psychology of Gender (^)
Health Promotion and Education:
Aging and Health
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:
Financial Resource Management for LYHS Agencies
Communication Studies:
Gender Issues in Communication
Family Communication (^)
Humanities:
Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction
Social Science:
Women, Men, and Society
American Racial and Ethnic Minorities
United States History:
United States Women's History
Sociology:
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (^)
Total hours for Women's Health Area52
Accreditation/Credentialing Area - Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g)Global Service Mission (3 hours required)3
HPE 4167/5167 (410:167g)Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions3
HPE 4247/5247 (410:147g)Minority Health3
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g)Public Health Theory3
HPE 4373/5373Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs4
HPE 4383/5383Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy4
HPE 4438/5438 (410:138g)International Health3
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g)Nutrition for Health Promotion3
Total Hours for Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance Area49
Accreditation/Credentialing Area - Environmental Health: Science Intensive
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g)Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations3
HPE 4667/5667Human Toxicology for Environmental and Occupational Health: Principles and Applications3
Biology:
BIOL 2051 (840:051)General Biology: Organismal Diversity4
BIOL 2052 (840:052)General Biology: Cell Structure and Function4
BIOL 3151 (840:151)General Microbiology4
Chemistry and Biochemistry:8-9
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
or
Applied Organic and Biochemistry
and General Chemistry I-II
Electives (select 3 hours from the following):3
Health Promotion and Education:
Environmental Health, Field Methods, Technology, and Laboratory Applications
Biology:
Genetics
Cancer and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Entomology
Immunology
Ecology
Restoration Ecology
Chemistry and Biochemistry:
Chromatography and Quantitative Analysis
Earth Science:
Introduction to Geology
Environmental Geology
Total hours for credentialing area Environmental Health: Science Intensive46-47
Accreditation/Credentialing Area - Community Nutrition Track
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 1030Basic Nutrition2
HPE 1031Nutrition for Early Childhood Education2
HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g)Global Service Mission (3 hours required)3-6
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g)Public Health Theory3
HPE 4373/5373Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs4
HPE 4383/5383Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy4
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g)Nutrition for Health Promotion3
Electives (select 3 hours from the following):3
Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions
Minority Health
International Health
Total Hours for Community Nutrition Area47

Minors

Health Education Minor-Teaching 

Current First Aid and CPR certification is required of all minors prior to student teaching.

Required:
Methods course:2-3
Secondary School Health Education Methods *
Health and Physical Education for Elementary Teachers
Applied Human Sciences, School of:3
Human Relationships and Sexuality **
Family Relationships
Health Promotion and Education:14-17
Stress Management
Mental Health and Well-Being in the Classroom
Drug Prevention Education for School Health Educators
Drugs and Individual Behavior
Community and Public Health
Introduction to Public Health
Health Education Curriculum
Physical Activity and Nutrition for Health and Fitness
Nutrition for Health Promotion
Both KAHHS 1020 and KAHHS 1030 Dimensions of Wellbeing OR
Health Care and the Consumer
Human Diseases for School Health Educators
Electives: Remaining hours of health-related electives for the K-8 and 5-12 endorsement to total a minimum of 26 hours. ***
Total hours26
*

 KAHHS 2045 Health and Physical Education for Elementary Teachers for the K-8 endorsement and HPE 3240 (410:140) Secondary School Health Education Methods for the 5-12 endorsement.

**

 FAM SERV 1020 (31F:020) Family Relationships for K-8 endorsement or  FAM SERV 1057 (31F:057) Human Relationships and Sexuality for 5-12 endorsement.

***

Approved electives include EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) Dynamics of Human Development, PEMES 2019 First Aid and CPR for Physical Educators, PEMES 2050 (420:050) Anatomy and Physiology of Human Movement, PEMES 3151 (420:151) Introductory Biomechanics, PEMES 3153 (420:153) Physiology of Exercise, PEMES 4152/5152 (420:152g) Adapted Physical Education or other electives approved by Health Education.

Health Promotion Minor

Liberal Arts core courses included in minor program requirements are distinguished by italics.
Required:
Health Promotion and Education:21
Introduction to Public Health
Health Care and the Consumer
Public Health Theory
Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs *
Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy
Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis
Human Diseases
Total Hours21
*

This course ha additional prerequisites as follows:
HPE 4373/5373 has prerequisite of STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods. STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods may be used to satisfy Category 1C of the Liberal Arts Core.

Master of Arts Degree Program

Major in Health Education

The Master of Arts degree in Health Education provides post-graduate academic training for individuals employed in or planning to seek employment as public health practitioners and health educators in a wide variety of settings including public, academic, hospital/clinical, community/non-profit, and corporate settings.  This degree program provides graduate level training designed to prepare public health and health promotion professionals to design, implement, and evaluate interventions working in a wide range of health, public health and health promotion areas. The post-graduate training program enhances the leadership and research skills of public health workers, preparing them for positions of progressive responsibility within their chosen career.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should  refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact  Health Promotion and Education (within the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services) for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 30-34 semester hours is required, depending on the emphasis chosen. Additional hours may be required, if, upon entering the graduate program, the student needs background courses. The thesis option requires 6 hours of thesis research HPE 6299 (410:299). The non-thesis option requires a research paper for 2 hours credit HPE 6299 (410:299). A minimum of 12 hours, exclusive of HPE 6299 (410:299) credit, must be at the 200/6000-level.

Successful completion of a final written comprehensive examination is required for both the thesis and non-thesis options.

Two emphases are offered on this major:

I. Health Promotion/Fitness Management Emphasis

Required:
Choose one of the following: 3
Kinesiology, Allied Health and Human Services, Interdepartmental:
Quantitative Methods in KAHHS
Qualitative Methods
Choose one of the following: 3
Measurement and Research:
Educational Research
Research Methods for KAHHS
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 4393/5393Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis3
HPE 4431/5431 (410:131g)Worksite Health Promotion3
HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g)Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations3
HPE 6271 (410:271)Cardiovascular Physiology3
HPE 6390 (410:290)Philosophy and Ethics of Public Health and Health Promotion3
Health Promotion Graduate Seminar:
HPE 6289 (410:289)Seminar1
Management:
MGMT 3965/5965 (150:165g)Organizational Behavior3
Physical Education:
PEMES 6253 (420:253)Advanced Exercise Physiology3
Research:
HPE 6299 (410:299)Research2 or 6
Thesis option (6 hrs.)
Non-thesis option (2 hrs.)
Total hours thesis option34
Total hours non-thesis option30

II.   Community Health Education Emphasis

Required:
Health Promotion and Education:
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g)Public Health Theory3
HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g)Global Service Mission3-6
HPE 4373/5373Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs4
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g)Human Diseases3
HPE 4393/5393Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g)Environmental Health Science3
HPE 6220 (410:220)Health Determinants3
or HPE 4247/5247 (410:147g) Minority Health
HPE 6289 (410:289)Seminar1
HPE 6390 (410:290)Philosophy and Ethics of Public Health and Health Promotion3
Kinesiology, Allied Health and Human Services, Interdepartmental:
KAHHS 6290Research Methods for KAHHS3
Research
HPE 6299 (410:299)Research2 or 6
Thesis option (6 hrs.)
Non-thesis option (2 hrs.)
Total hours Thesis option35
Total hours Non-thesis option31

HPE 6299

Thesis option (6 hrs):

  • Minimum of 3 committee members, comprehensive exam, and oral defense, plus culminating substantive graduate paper on a research project: OR

Non-Thesis Option (2 hrs.)

  • Minimum of 1 committee member and no oral defense, plus culminating substantive graduate paper on an applied field project that addresses one or more of the following areas: a detailed literature review on subject matter relevant to a field project; a needs assessment; program implementation strategies that demonstrate theory-to-practice models; and/or evaluation research on field project outcomes.       

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following program certificates, contact the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Environmental Health Certificate

Required:9
Health Promotion and Education/Environmental Science:6
Environmental Health Science
Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations
Health Promotion:3
Human Diseases
Electives: 6 hours chosen from either or both of the following categories:6
I. Public Health Focus Area:
Health Promotion and Education:
Introduction to Women's Health
Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs
Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy
Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis
Biology:
Cancer and Emerging Infectious Diseases
II. Environmental Sciences Focus Area:
Biology:
General Microbiology
Conservation Biology
Environmental Science:
Environmental Biology
Topics in Environmental Chemistry
Total Hours15

Certificate in Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance

Required:
Health Promotion and Education:12-15
Global Service Mission
Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions
Minority Health
International Health
Total Hours12-15

Leisure, Youth and Human Services

Academic Policies

Major Requirements

The following criteria shall be used to determine student eligibility for the Leisure, Youth and Human Services major:

  1. 2.00 or above cumulative UNI GPA.
  2. A grade of C (2.00) or higher in all courses applied to the major. If the student earns less than a C in a major course, s(he) must retake the course within two semesters in order to apply it to the major.

Within one semester after full admission to the major, students must file an approved undergraduate Program of Study, including all electives to be taken for the major.

In order to remain in good academic standing, students must maintain a cumulative major GPA of 2.50 or above. Students whose GPAs fall below 2.50 will have one semester in which to raise grades to the required level. If they are unable to do so, they must retake the course or courses that caused the GPA to fall below 2.50, and they will be administratively dropped from any other major courses for which they have registered.

In order to be eligible for internship and graduation, students must:

  1. Meet the academic criteria above.
  2. Complete a minimum of 500 Professional Experience hours in Leisure, Youth and Human Service settings.
  3. Hold or obtain current certification in American Red Cross CPR PRO (Professional Rescuer), American Red Cross AED (Automatic External Defibrillation), American Red Cross First Aid, American Red Cross PDT (Prevention of Disease Transmission), and Child/Dependent Adult Abuse Mandatory Reporter Training.
  4. Students are required to demonstrate computer competency prior to enrolling in seminar.

Minor Requirements

Admission to the Leisure, Youth and Human Services and Youth Services Administration minors requires students to have a cumulative UNI GPA of 2.00. To graduate with a minor in Leisure, Youth and Human Services, students must have a minor GPA of 2.50, with a grade of C (2.00) or higher in all courses applied to the minor. Students must officially declare the minor.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program

Leisure, Youth and Human Services Major

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major prepares students to deliver programs and manage facilities designed to meet human, community, and social needs in public, governmental, and nonprofit community agencies. Graduates may find employment in agencies that serve people of all ages from diverse backgrounds in areas such as municipal parks and recreation, commercial recreation, tourism, outdoor recreation, therapeutic recreation (clinical and community-based settings), the nonprofit and youth serving agencies, armed forces recreation, campus recreation, and other leisure service delivery sectors. The major focuses on direct service programming with an emphasis on supervisory and managerial skills. The Leisure, Youth and Human Services program is accredited by NRPA/AALR.

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major requires all students to take a common core of courses with additional supporting courses in areas of professional interest.

Required core:
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:35
Introduction to Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Leadership in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Management of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Programming for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Research and Evaluation in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Seminar (2 hrs.)
Senior Project (3 hrs.)
Internship (12 hrs.)
Students will work with their assigned advisor to develop an area of professional interest with appropriate corresponding LYHS supporting courses:21
Total Hours56

Minor

For Academic Policies regarding minors within the Division of Leisure, Youth and Human Services see Minor Requirements.

Leisure, Youth and Human Services Minor

Required:
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:12
Introduction to Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Leadership in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Inclusive Recreation and Diversity in LYHS
Programming for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Electives (select two of the following):6
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:
Management of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Principles of Therapeutic Recreation II
Research and Evaluation in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Areas and Facilities for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Festivals and Special Events Management
Total Hours18

Master of Arts Degree Program

Major in Leisure, Youth and Human Services

This major is designed to foster preparation for professional leadership roles in the administration of leisure, youth and human services agencies. The program offers the student the opportunity to take an active role in determining personal learning objectives and developing individual programs of study. The program supports professional development through the utilization of relevant philosophy, content, and skills in order to provide management and leadership for effective and efficient delivery of leisure, youth and human services. Students are encouraged to focus on study that has direct relevance to professional practice.  Students can design programs of study for work in campus recreation, nonprofit settings, community recreation, tourism organizations, sports administration, and outdoor resource management.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact Leisure, Youth and Human Services (within the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services) for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options.  A minimum of 36 semester hours is required for the thesis option, and a minimum of 33 semester hours is required for the non-thesis option.  Up to an additional 12 hours of undergraduate work may be required for students who do not have undergraduate preparation in the area.  The thesis option requires a minimum of 15 hours of 200/6000-level course work, including 6 hours of LYHS 6299 (430:299) Research . The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 12 hours of 200/6000-level course work, including 3 hours of LYHS 6299 (430:299) Research . Successful completion of a final comprehensive examination (research paper/thesis) is required for both the thesis and non-thesis options. A final oral comprehensive examination will occur simultaneously during the oral defense of the research paper or thesis.

Required: *
Minimum of one research course from the following:3
Kinesiology, Allied Health and Human Services, Interdepartmental:
Qualitative Methods
Research Methods for KAHHS
Sociology:
Quantitative Research
Statistical Analysis course:3
Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services, Interdepartmental:
Quantitative Methods in KAHHS
Research:3 or 6
Research
Thesis option (6 hrs.)
Non-thesis option (3 hrs.)
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:6
Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
At least one of the following:
Social Policy and Issues in Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Social Psychology of Leisure
Select from the following of PEMES/420:xxx/5xxx/6xxx, LYHS/430:xxx/5xxx/6xxx, KAHHS/440:xxx/5xxx/6xxx or other graduate level courses on campus as approved by advisor:18
Total hours thesis option36
Total hours non-thesis option33

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following program certificates, contact the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Aquatics Specialization Certificate

The purpose of this certificate is to develop and produce quality graduates who have the appropriate skills and certifications to obtain employment in the aquatic profession. Upon completion of the certificate, students will be able to teach Lifeguarding, Water Safety, and be certified as a pool operator through national certifications.

Required:
Physical Education:7
Fundamental Physical Activities -- Aquatics
Lifeguard Training and Instruction
Water Safety Instruction
Certified Pool Operators
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:6
Introduction to Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Programming for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Electives: 5 hours as approved by advisor, selected from the following:5
Physical Education:
PEMES 1A39 (420:A39) (Canoeing, 1 hr.)
PEMES 1A66 (420:A66) (Skin & Scuba Diving, 2 hrs.)
Assisting in Physical Activity and Wellness
PEMES 3186 (420:186) (Studies in PE: Coaching Swimming, 2 hrs.)
PEMES 3186 (420:186) (Studies in Small Craft Safety/Water Rescue, 1 hr.)
PEMES 3186 (420:186) (Studies in Physical Education: Lifeguard Instructor Training, 1 hr.)
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:
Areas and Facilities for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Total Hours18

 

Nonprofit Management Certificate

This certificate provides knowledge, skill-building and professional experience for students interested in working in the nonprofit sector. Earning this certificate at UNI also enables students to earn a national certificate in Nonprofit Management from Nonprofit Leadership Alliance.

Students interested in this certificate should contact the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services (319-273-2141).

Required:
Youth and Human Service Administration:12
Principles of Nonprofit Organizations
Management of Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Human Resource Development for Leisure, Youth and Human Services
Financial Resource Management for LYHS Agencies
Leisure Services Internship:8
Internship
Nonprofit Leadership Practicum:2
Nonprofit Leadership Practicum, Level II
Total Hours22

 

Outdoor Recreation Certificate

The Outdoor Recreation Certificate program is designed to train students for professional employment in the varied and growing field of outdoor recreation and adventure education. This program offers students the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of outdoor recreation activities while studying the theories, trends and issues involved in working with groups, facilitating adventure education, and managing the impacts of recreation on our natural environment. The Certificate in Outdoor Recreation is available to students in all majors.

Required:
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:12
Principles of Outdoor Recreation
Theory and Practice of Experiential Education
Trends and Issues in Outdoor Recreation
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Outdoor recreation activity skills classes:3
PEMES 1xxx (activity skills courses)
Total Hours15

School-Age Care Leadership Certificate

This certificate is designed to provide students participating in the Camp Adventure Youth Services program an opportunity to receive credit for their application of youth development principles to school-age children (ages 5-12) in global settings.

Required:
Leisure, Youth and Human Services:15
Leisure, Youth and Human Services Field Experience
Field Experience in Camp Counseling
Camp Management Systems
Electives: selected from the following:2-3
Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching
Educational Psychology and Foundations:
Development and Assessment of Young Children
Psychology of Adolescence
Theories of Human Development
School of Applied Human Sciences:
Human Identity and Relationships
Family Relationships
Human Growth and Development
Total Hours17-18

Tourism Certificate

The Tourism Certificate is administered by Leisure, Youth and Human Services within the Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services, College of Education. For information on this program certificate, contact the Division of Leisure, Youth and Human Services, Tourism Advisor, 203 WRC.

Required:
Leisure, Youth, and Human Services (6 hrs):6
Marketing for Leisure, Youth and Human Service Agencies
Principles of Tourism
Select three of the following:
Leisure, Youth and Human Services (9 hrs):9
Conferences, Expositions and Conventions in Tourism
Festivals and Special Events Management
Managing Recreation Impacts on the Natural Environment
Eco, Adventure and Sport Tourism
Community Based Tourism
Community Planning Workshop
Total Hours15
*

If student has successfully completed MKTG 2110 (130:101) Principles of Marketing, this course can be substituted for LYHS 2075 (430:075) Marketing for Leisure, Youth and Human Service Agencies.

Athletic Training

Athletic Training and Rehabilitation Studies, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function 4
AT 1010 (42T:023) Introduction to Athletic Training and Applied Health Care 2
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Liberal Arts Core 8
 Hours15
Spring
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
AT 3020 Clinical Anatomy 3
AT 3030 Acute Care in Athletic Training 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Liberal Arts Core 3
 Hours14
Sophomore
Fall
BIOL 3101 (840:101) Anatomy and Physiology I 4
AT 3040 (42T:137) Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology I 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
AT 3186 Studies in Health Care Organization & Professional Responsibility 3
Liberal Arts Core 5
 Hours16
Spring
BIOL 3102 (840:102) Anatomy and Physiology II 4
AT 3050 (42T:134) Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology II 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Liberal Arts Core 8
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
PHYSICS 1511 (880:054) General Physics I 4
AT 3186 Studies in Foundations of Therapeutic Interventions 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Liberal Arts Core/University Electives 7
 Hours15
Spring
AT 3091 Foundations of Pharmacology 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Core Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core/University Electives 8
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Core Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core/University Electives 9
 Hours16
Spring
AT 3186 Studies in Clinical Health Care Experience 1
Core Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core/University Electives 9
 Hours13
 Total Hours120

Health Promotion and Education

Health Promotion: Wellness and Fitness, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 15
 Hours15
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 12
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 5
HPE 1101 (410:005) Introduction to Public Health 2
PEMES 2050 (420:050) Anatomy and Physiology of Human Movement 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 7
Liberal Arts Core 6
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g) Public Health Theory 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
HPE 4431/5431 (410:131g) Worksite Health Promotion 3
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g) Nutrition for Health Promotion 3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g) Environmental Health Science 3
HPE 4373/5373 Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs 4
HPE 4393/5393 Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 3
HPE 3118 (410:118) Teaching Aerobics 1
HPE 4155 (410:155g) Stress Management 2
HPE 4164 (410:164g) Health Care and the Consumer 2
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g) Human Diseases 3
PEMES 3153 (420:153) Physiology of Exercise 3
 Hours14
Senior
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 3
PEMES 3156 (420:156) Fitness Assessment and Programming 3
HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar 3
HPE 4383/5383 Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy 4
 Hours15
Spring
HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion 9
University Electives 4
 Hours13
 Total Hours120
*

 * Cumulative GPA of 2.5 required for an internship and graduation.

Health Promotion: Science Intensive-Environmental Health, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 12
BIOL 2051 (840:051) General Biology: Organismal Diversity 4
 Hours16
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 9
BIOL 2052 (840:052) General Biology: Cell Structure and Function 4
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
 Hours16
Sophomore
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 6
HPE 1101 (410:005) Introduction to Public Health 2
CHEM 1110 (860:044) General Chemistry I 4
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
University Electives 7
Liberal Arts Core 4
CHEM 1120 (860:048) General Chemistry II 4
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
HPE 4667/5667 Human Toxicology for Environmental and Occupational Health: Principles and Applications 3
BIOL 3151 (840:151) General Microbiology 4
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 3
HPE 4393/5393 Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis 3
 Hours15
Spring
Environmental Health Electives 3
University Electives 6
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g) Human Diseases 3
HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g) Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations 3
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
University Electives 10
HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar 3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g) Environmental Health Science 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 9
HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion 3
 Hours12
 Total Hours120
*

* Cumulative GPA of 2.5 required for an internship and graduation.

Health Promotion: Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 15
 Hours15
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 12
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
University Electives/Minor 5
Liberal Arts Core 6
HPE 1101 (410:005) Introduction to Public Health 2
HPE 4247/5247 (410:147g) Minority Health 3
 Hours16
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 7
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g) Public Health Theory 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
University Electives 2
HPE 4167/5167 (410:167g) Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions 3
HPE 4393/5393 Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis 3
HPE 4438/5438 (410:138g) International Health 3
HPE 4373/5373 Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs 4
 Hours15
Spring
University Electives 6
HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g) Global Service Mission 3
HPE 4383/5383 Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy 4
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g) Human Diseases 3
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
University Electives 6
HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar 3
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g) Nutrition for Health Promotion 3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g) Environmental Health Science 3
 Hours15
Spring
HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion 9
University Electives 3
 Hours12
 Total Hours120
*

  * Cumulative GPA of 2.5 required for an internship and graduation.

Health Promotion: Women's Health, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 12
WGS 1040 (680:040) Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction 3
 Hours15
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 12
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
University Electives 5
Liberal Arts Core 6
HPE 1101 (410:005) Introduction to Public Health 2
HPE 2120 (410:020) Maternal and Infant Health 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 7
Liberal Arts Core 6
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g) Public Health Theory 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
HPE 4162/5162 (410:162g) Introduction to Women's Health 3
HPE 4393/5393 Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis 3
HPE 4373/5373 Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs 4
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g) Nutrition for Health Promotion 3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g) Environmental Health Science 3
 Hours16
Spring
University Electives 3
Women's Health Electives 6
HPE 4328/5328 (410:128g) Selected Topics in Women's Health 3
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g) Human Diseases 3
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 6
HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar 3
HPE 4383/5383 Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy 4
 Hours15
Spring
HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion 9
University Electives 3
 Hours12
 Total Hours120
*

  * Cumulative GPA of 2.5 required for an internship and graduation.

Health Promotion: Community Nutrition, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 15
 Hours15
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 12
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
HPE 1101 (410:005) Introduction to Public Health 2
HPE 4247/5247 (410:147g) Minority Health 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 5
 Hours16
Spring
HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g) Public Health Theory 3
HPE 1030 Basic Nutrition 2
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 5
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
HPE 4167/5167 (410:167g) Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions 3
HPE 4373/5373 Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs 4
HPE 4438/5438 (410:138g) International Health 3
HPE 4393/5393 Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis 3
Liberal Arts Core 2
 Hours15
Spring
HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g) Global Service Mission 3
HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g) Human Diseases 3
HPE 4383/5383 Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy 4
HPE 1031 Nutrition for Early Childhood Education 2
University Electives 4
 Hours16
Senior
Fall
HPE 3693 (410:193) Internship Seminar 3
HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g) Nutrition for Health Promotion 3
HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g) Environmental Health Science 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion 9
University Electives 3
 Hours12
 Total Hours120

Leisure, Youth and Human Services

Leisure, Youth and Human Services, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
Liberal Arts Core 15
 Hours15
Spring
Liberal Arts Core 15
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 9
LYHS 2010 (430:010) Introduction to Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
LYHS 2020 (430:020) Leadership in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
 Hours15
Spring
LYHS Supporting coursework 3
University Electives/Minor 6
Liberal Arts Core 4
LYHS 3121 (430:121) Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
LYHS Supporting coursework 9
University Electives 3
LYHS 3050 (430:114) Management of Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
 Hours15
Spring
LYHS Supporting coursework 9
University Electives 3
LYHS 3060 (430:110) Programming for Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Liberal Arts Core 2
University Electives 7
LYHS 4070/5070 (430:169g) Research and Evaluation in Leisure, Youth and Human Services 3
LYHS 4080 (430:189) Seminar 2
 Hours14
Spring
LYHS 4090 (430:184) Senior Project 3
LYHS 4095 (430:187) Internship 12
 Hours15
 Total Hours120
*

 * Must have a 'C' or higher in all major coursework.

**

 ** 2.5 major GPA requirement.

Athletic Training Courses

AT 1010 (42T:023). Introduction to Athletic Training and Applied Health Care — 2 hrs.

Introduction to the field of athletic training and other healthcare professions with emphasis on practice guidelines, policies and procedures, risk management, roles and responsibilities of athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals, and common illnesses and injuries. (Variable)

AT 1018 (42T:018). Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries — 2 hrs.

Provides foundational athletic training content that is pertinent for students preparing to enter the athletic coaching or physical education field. Emphasis placed on orthopedic injury description, prevention, treatment, and recovery. Prerequisite(s): PEMES 2024 (420:024) or PEMES 2050 (420:050). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

AT 1019 (42T:019). Prevention and Care Laboratory — 1 hr.

Laboratory experiences in first aid, CPR, and care of injuries for the physically active. Opportunity is provided to become certified in American Red Cross First Aid, and Community CPR. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): AT 1018 (42T:018). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

AT 3000 (42T:140). Athletic Training Clinical Integration — 1-2 hrs.

Entry-level educational experiences in athletic training knowledge and skills including: 1) skill competencies tied to athletic training coursework, 2) clinical experience, 3) completion of clinical integration proficiencies, and 4) comprehensive learning. This course is to be taken over a minimum of four semesters and will include a clinical experience during each semester. (May be repeated for maximum of 8 hours). Prerequisite(s): acceptance into the athletic training program. (Fall and Spring)

AT 3010. Athletic Training Terminology — 1 hr.

The content delivered in this course will allow students to gain knowledge specific to musculoskeletal human anatomy and injury terminology. Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); admission into the athletic training program. (Summer)

AT 3011. Clinical Skills in Athletic Training — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skills instruction with practical examinations covering the material necessary to begin the athletic training clinical experience (AT 3000 (42T:140) Clinical Integration). Prerequisite(s): admission to the athletic training program. (Summer)

AT 3020. Clinical Anatomy — 3 hrs.

Clinical anatomy of the human body which includes palpation, range of motion assessment, neurological testing, and structure identification and function. Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); admission into the athletic training program. (Summer)

AT 3030. Acute Care in Athletic Training — 3 hrs.

The theory, ethics, components, indications, and psychomotor skills of acute and emergency care in athletic training. (Variable)

AT 3031. Acute Care Clinical Skills — 2 hrs.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 3030. Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); Corequisite(s): AT 3030. (Fall)

AT 3040 (42T:137). Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology I — 3 hrs.

Recognition and understanding of athletic injuries and conditions occurring to the lower extremities. (Variable)

AT 3042. Injury Assessment Clinical Skills I — 2 hrs.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 3040 (42T:137). Prerequisite(s): AT 3020 and admittance into the Athletic Training program; Corequisite(s): AT 3040 (42T:137). (Fall)

AT 3050 (42T:134). Foundations of Orthopedic Injury Assessment & Pathology II — 3 hrs.

Recognition and understanding of athletic injuries and conditions occurring to the upper extremities, torso, axial skeleton, and head. (Variable)

AT 3052. Injury Assessment Clinical Skills II — 2 hrs.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 3050 (42T:134). Prerequisite(s): AT 3040 (42T:137) and admittance into the Athletic Training program; Corequisite(s): AT 3050 (42T:134). (Spring)

AT 3060 (42T:110). Athletic Training Administration and Professional Development — 3 hrs.

Entry-level theoretical and practical study of organization, administration, and professional development and responsibility in the field of athletic training. Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); admission into the athletic training program; junior standing. (Variable)

AT 3070 (42T:143). Therapeutic Interventions I — 3 hrs.

Entry-level study of the effects, advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, precautions, and the application parameters of therapeutic interventions of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); AT 3011; AT 3020; admission into athletic training undergraduate; junior standing. (Fall)

AT 3072. Therapeutic Interventions Clinical Skills I — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 3070 (42T:143). Prerequisite(s): AT 1010 (42T:023); AT 3011; AT 3020; admission into athletic training program; Junior Standing. Corequisite(s): AT 3070 (42T:143). (Fall)

AT 3080 (42T:157). Therapeutic Interventions II — 3 hrs.

Entry-level study of the effects, advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, precautions, and the application parameters of therapeutic interventions of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): AT 3070 (42T:143); AT 3020; admission into the athletic training program; junior standing. (Variable)

AT 3082. Therapeutic Interventions Clinical Skills II — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 3080 (42T:157). Prerequisite(s): AT 3020; AT 3070 (42T:143); admission into the Athletic Training program; Junior Standing. Corequisite(s): AT 3080 (42T:157). (Spring)

AT 3091. Foundations of Pharmacology — 3 hrs.

Effects, indications, and contraindications of common therapeutic medications as it relates to general medical conditions. Prerequisite(s): Declared Athletic Training & Rehabilitation Studies major or departmental consent. (Variable)

AT 3110 (42T:165). Psychological Considerations for Athletic Injuries and Rehabilitation — 2 hrs.

Understanding of psychological considerations associated with athletic injury including athletic training scope of practice, recognition/intervention, motivation, and common conditions. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): AT 3040 (42T:137). (Variable)

AT 3120 (42T:170). Clinical Decision Making in Athletic Training and Orthopedic Pathology I — 3 hrs.

Entry-level study of the pathology of lower body orthopedic injuries and conditions that are commonly seen by certified athletic trainers and the process of making clinical decisions based on an understanding of evidence based athletic training relative to the type and severity of injury. Clinical decisions specific to orthopedic injury include: immediate care, recognition, diagnostic criteria, referral, and prognosis. Prerequisite(s): admission into the Athletic Training program. (Fall)

AT 3125. Clinical Decision Making in Athletic Training & Orthopedic Pathology II — 3 hrs.

Entry-level study of the pathology of upper body orthopedic injuries and conditions that are commonly seen by certified athletic trainers and the process of making clinical decisions based on an understanding of evidence based athletic training relative to the type and severity of injury. Clinical decisions specific to orthopedic injury include: immediate care, recognition, diagnostic criteria, referral, and prognosis. (Fall or Spring). Prerequisite(s): admission into the Athletic Training program. (Spring)

AT 3130 (42T:175). General Medical Conditions — 3 hrs.

Study of general medical conditions and disabilities commonly seen by certified athletic trainers. Prerequisite(s): AT 3060 (42T:110); admission into athletic training undergraduate; junior standing. (Variable)

AT 3250. Preventive Health Care Techniques — 3 hrs.

Theoretical and practical study of strategies and programs to prevent the incidence and/or severity of injuries and illnesses and optimize the overall health and quality of life of patients. This includes nutrition and physical activity in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and preventing chronic disease. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Athletic Training Program; AT 3011; AT 3020; AT 3030; AT 3050 (42T:134); junior standing. (Variable)

AT 3300. Gross Human Anatomy — 3 hrs.

The exploration of human anatomy through human cadaver dissection. Prerequisite(s): Consent of AT Division. (Variable)

AT 4140 (42T:178). Current Trends in Athletic Training — 2 hrs.

Discussion of current topics and trends in the clinical practice and professional development of athletic training. Prerequisite(s): AT 3050 (42T:134). (Fall)

AT 4150 (42T:180). Athletic Training Seminar — 2 hrs.

Resume writing, interviewing, and a comprehensive review of the athletic training educational competencies. Prerequisite(s): AT 3060 (42T:110); senior standing. (Spring)

AT 6000. Integrated Clinical Experiences — 1-4 hrs.

Comprehensive educational experiences in athletic training psychomotor and cognitive domains, and clinical proficiencies to be supervised/mentored in multiple practicum sections through athletic training field experiences, integrated teaching lab activities, and skills-based assessment. May be repeated; 11 credit hours required, may be repeated up to 13 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Masters Athletic Training program. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

AT 6030. Advanced Acute Care in Athletic Training — 3 hrs.

The theory, ethics, components, indications, and psychomotor skills of emergency care in athletic training. Evidence-based research and practices are explored in relation to standard practices. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Professional Masters Athletic Training program. Corequisite(s): AT 6000. (Variable)

AT 6032. Advanced Acute Care Clinical Skills — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 6030. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6060. Athletic Training Organization & Professional Responsibility — 3 hrs.

Theoretical and practical study of organization, administration, and professional development and responsibility in the field of athletic training. Prerequisite(s): Admission into M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6070. Advanced Therapeutic Interventions I — 3 hrs.

Advanced study of the effects, advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, precautions, and the application parameters of therapeutic interventions of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): AT 6100; AT 6150. (Variable)

AT 6072. Advanced Therapeutic Interventions I Clinical Skills — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 6070. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6080. Advanced Therapeutic Interventions II — 3 hrs.

Advanced study of the effects, advantages, disadvantages, indications, contraindications, precautions, and the application parameters of therapeutic interventions of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): AT 6070. (Variable)

AT 6082. Advanced Therapeutic Interventions II Clinical Skills — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 6080. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6100. Advanced Clinical Anatomy — 3 hrs.

Didactic and psychomotor skills instruction with practical examinations covering the material necessary to begin the athletic training clinical experience, and clinical anatomy of the human body including palpation, range of motion, neurological testing, and structure identification and function. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Masters of Athletic Training program. (Variable)

AT 6130. General Medical Assessment & Referral — 3 hrs.

Study of general medical conditions and disabilities commonly seen by certified athletic trainers. Prerequisite(s): Admission into M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6150. Advanced Athletic Training Clinical Skills — 2 hrs.

Didactic and psychomotor skills instruction with practical examinations covering the material necessary to begin the athletic training clinical experience. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6210 (42T:210). Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment I — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of pathological, etiological, and neuromuscular mechanisms of musculoskeletal injuries with emphasis on advanced orthopaedic assessment techniques of the upper body. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Masters of Athletic Training program or Masters of Science in Athletic Training graduate program. (Variable)

AT 6215. Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment I Clinical Skills — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 6210 (42T:210). Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6220 (42T:220). Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment II — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of pathological, etiological, and neuromuscular mechanisms of musculoskeletal injuries with emphasis on advanced orthopaedic assessment techniques of the lower body. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Masters of Athletic Training program or Masters of Science in Athletic Training graduate program. (Variable)

AT 6225. Pathoetiology and Orthopaedic Assessment II Clinical Skills — 1 hr.

Didactic and psychomotor skill instruction with practical examinations covering the material taught in AT 6220 (42T:220). Prerequisite(s): Admission into the M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6240 (42T:230). Evidence Based Practice I — 3 hrs.

In-depth analysis of current literature, research, case studies, and techniques directed toward the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries to the upper body of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): NATABOC certification; admission into the athletic training graduate program. (Variable)

AT 6250 (42T:240). Evidence Based Practice II — 2 hrs.

In-depth analysis of current literature, research, case studies, and techniques directed toward the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries to the lower body of the physically active. Prerequisite(s): NATABOC certification; admission into the athletic training graduate program. (Odd Falls)

AT 6255. Preventative Health Techniques — 3 hrs.

Advanced theoretical and practical study of strategies and programs to prevent the incidence and/or severity of injuries and illnesses and optimize the overall health and quality of life of patients. This includes nutrition and physical activity in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and preventing chronic disease. Prerequisite(s): Admission in to M.ATR. program. (Variable)

AT 6260 (42T:250). Orthopaedic Surgical Interventions — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of pathological, biomechanical, and neuromuscular mechanisms of musculoskeletal injuries and the study of orthopaedic surgical interventions commonly performed for musculoskeletal injuries suffered by the physically active. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Masters of Athletic Training program or Masters of Science in Athletic Training graduate program (Variable)

AT 6275. Mental Health Care in Athletic Training Practice — 3 hrs.

This course promotes the understanding of mental health care as it relates to athletic training practice and the coordination of care as it pertains to athletic training patients. The focus of this course includes the understanding of mental health disorders, diagnostic criteria, appropriate referral to qualified health care providers, and treatment options. The course will also address patient response to orthopedic injury and its interdependent relationship with activity limitations and participation restrictions. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Athletic Training graduate program. (Variable)

AT 6289 (42T:289). Seminar in Athletic Training — 1-8 hrs.

Special topics in athletic training and/or other allied health professions as indicated in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): admitted into the Doctor of Education Rehabilitation Studies intensive study area and/or the Master of Science Athletic Training degree program. (Fall and Spring)

AT 6297 (42T:297). Practicum — 1-4 hrs.

Practical experience in athletic training which includes, but is not limited to teaching, research, and clinical practice. May be repeated for maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite(s): admitted into the Doctor of Education Rehabilitation Studies intensive study area and/or the Master of Science Athletic Training degree program. (Fall and Spring)

AT 6300. Advanced Gross Human Anatomy — 3 hrs.

The exploration of human anatomy through human cadaver dissection. Prerequisite(s): consent of AT Division. (Variable)

AT 7310 (42T:301). Critical Theories and Practices in Rehabilitation — 3 hrs.

In-depth examination of current theories and practices relevant to the field of athletic training. Building on foundational theory, students will analyze and critique the clinical practices and philosophies of certified athletic trainers and/or other allied health professionals. Prerequisite(s): admitted into the Doctor of Education Rehabilitation Studies intensive study area. (Variable)

AT 7320 (42T:310). Clinical Teaching Skills in Allied Health Professions — 3 hrs.

Examination of issues and problems in teaching clinical proficiencies including the roles of clinical instructors, factors affecting teaching and the learning environment, learning over time, course planning, and teaching strategies. Prerequisite(s): admission into the Doctor of Education Rehabilitation intensive study area. (Variable)

Health Promotion and Education Courses

HPE 1030. Basic Nutrition — 2 hrs.

Study of nutrition in relation to growth development and maintenance of the body. No credit for NUTR 1030 if credit previously earned in 310:032 Fundamentals of Nutrition. (Variable)

HPE 1031. Nutrition for Early Childhood Education — 2 hrs.

Study of the role of nutrition in the growth and development of young children, and the effect of nutrition on learning processes. Focus on nutritional needs of young children as well as the incorporation of nutrition education into the curriculum in early childhood education. (Variable)

HPE 1101 (410:005). Introduction to Public Health — 2 hrs.

Introduction to the public health activities concerned with the protection and care of the community; survey of the major specialties and populations of interest in the public health field. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 2120 (410:020). Maternal and Infant Health — 3 hrs.

Provides an overview of maternal and child health concepts, issues and trends. Topics covered include conception, pregnancy, childbirth, lactation and public health, prevention, and epidemiological issues in maternal and infant health. (Fall)

HPE 2160 (410:060). Medical Terminology — 2 hrs.

Basic terminology and vocabulary used in medical field; structural organization of the body, major anatomy, medical procedures and instrumentation, and medical specialties. (Variable)

HPE 3118 (410:118). Teaching Aerobics — 1 hr.

Preparation to teach aerobic activities, including aerobic dance, step and circuit aerobics, and aerobic kick boxing. (Spring)

HPE 3160 (410:160). Community and Public Health — 3 hrs.

Examination of the major public health issues facing the U.S. and world population. Investigation of major public health initiatives, public policy, and ethical issues related to public health. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as CAP 3160 (CAP:160)) (Variable)

HPE 3220. Human Diseases for School Health Educators — 1 hr.

Human Diseases for School Health Educators is designed to help the student develop basic knowledge and skills necessary to effectively incorporate the study of human diseases into the school health education curriculum. (Fall)

HPE 3230. Drug Prevention Education for School Health Educators — 2 hrs.

The course is designed to provide school health educators with basic information, skills, and coursework relevant to drug prevention education. Coursework is relevant to the needs of a school health educator and can be implemented into the school health education classroom. (Spring)

HPE 3240 (410:140). Secondary School Health Education Methods — 2 hrs.

Examination of role of the teacher in planning, delivering, and evaluating middle and high school health education; introduction of instructional methods and materials and their use demonstrated and practiced. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): completion of Level II or corequisite (TEACHING 3128; EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148)). (Spring)

HPE 3344 (410:144). Health Education Curriculum — 2 hrs.

Introduction to existing curricular models, the processes involved in developing materials, and the appropriate scope and sequence of learning activities in elementary, middle, and high school health education. Prerequisite(s): Completion of Level 1, which includes TEACHING 2017 Level 1 Field Experience and EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) Dynamics of Human Development. (Fall)

HPE 3650 (410:152). Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Health — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the concepts, theoretical basis, evidence-based analysis, and challenges and issues in integrative health and complementary and alternative medical practices (CAM). Integrative, alternative, and complementary medicine covers a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies involving the use of holistic or culturally-specific health services and practices in the treatment of illness and disease and embraces an expanded concept of health and illness. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as CAP 3152 (CAP:152)) (Variable)

HPE 3686 (410:185). Readings in Health Education — 1-4 hrs.

Credit based on student's proposal; to be determined at time of registration. Written contract will determine appropriate work load under credit guidelines. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 3689 (410:189). Seminar in Health Promotion — 3 hrs.

Focus on issues in community health education and the transition from student role to health educator or health promotion specialist role. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 3693 (410:193). Internship Seminar — 3 hrs.

The Health Promotion and Education internship seminar course is a professional development oriented course which provides skills and abilities related to job-seeking, career, and field experiences. The focus is on development of professional tools including portfolios, resumes, interviewing skills, and relevant certifications. This course is a prerequisite to HPE 4768 (410:168) Field Experience in Health Promotion. Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval. Corequisite(s): GERO 4195 (31G:195) or HPE 4768 (410:168) or SOC 3100. (Variable)

HPE 4125/5125 (410:125g). Aging and Health — 3 hrs.

Introduction to aging and health concerns of older individuals, and to broader issues of aging, health, and society. Study of aging demographics, biomedical aspects of aging, and selected issues of health and aging. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

HPE 4155 (410:155g). Stress Management — 2 hrs.

Introduction to stress and stress management, the relationship between stress and disease. Preference to Health Promotion majors. (Spring)

HPE 4161/5161 (410:161g). Global Service Mission — 3-6 hrs.

The Global Service Mission is a blended practicum that provides guided opportunities for students to conduct a short-term volunteer service project in their local community, around the United States, or internationally with underserved populations for academic credit. Offered credit/no credit basis only. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

HPE 4162/5162 (410:162g). Introduction to Women's Health — 3 hrs.

Survey of contemporary issues in women's health providing an understanding of women's personal health status, needs, and resources; awareness of women's health issues worldwide and the political, cultural, economic, and psychosocial factors which affect the health of women. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

HPE 4164 (410:164g). Health Care and the Consumer — 2 hrs.

Selection and use of health care products and services, alternative health care, health care insurance systems, consumer protection. (Spring)

HPE 4167/5167 (410:167g). Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions — 3 hrs.

Overview of the changing demographics in the United States, and discussion of how culturally competent health care can improve the wellbeing of underserved populations. Provides in-depth training in working in a culturally appropriate manner with multiple diverse populations in Iowa and the United States. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4247/5247 (410:147g). Minority Health — 3 hrs.

Exploration of public health issues and problems faced by members of minority populations. Includes public health field trips and cultural competency development experiences. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

HPE 4328/5328 (410:128g). Selected Topics in Women's Health — 3 hrs.

In-depth development and exploration of selected themes and topics in women's health. Focus on health issues that disproportionately affect women and examination of health issues, prevention programs, and strategies for health advocacy surrounding adolescent and adult unintended pregnancy, violence, substance abuse, and disordered eating through a feminist developmental perspective. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Spring)

HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g). Public Health Theory — 3 hrs.

Selected learning and behavior change theories and ethical principles that serve as the foundation for effective public health, health promotion, and health education practice; emphasis on the practical application of these theories and principles in public health program delivery. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4373/5373. Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs — 4 hrs.

Investigation of the social, epidemiological, behavioral, educational, and administrative factors related to planning health programs and the procedures and methods for health program evaluation. Prerequisite(s): STAT 1772 (800:072) or equivalent; HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g); junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4383/5383. Health Promotion Implementation and Advocacy — 4 hrs.

Methods, techniques, and resources used in advocacy and implementing for health promotion programs. Requires field-based work. Prerequisite(s): HPE 4353/5353 (410:153g); HPE 4373/5373; junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4393/5393. Epidemiological Methods, Research Design, and Analysis — 3 hrs.

Instruction in the methods of both descriptive and analytical epidemiology, the quantitative tools used in all areas of epidemiological surveillance and research design, and the development of a nuanced critique of research design and findings. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4431/5431 (410:131g). Worksite Health Promotion — 3 hrs.

Models of delivery of health promotion, disease prevention, and occupational health/safety programs to employee populations. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

HPE 4438/5438 (410:138g). International Health — 3 hrs.

Exploration of widely-different disease patterns found between developed and developing countries, and investigation of the complex factors that contribute to poor community health status. Discussion of wellness strategies for populations in developing countries, as well as for minorities, immigrants, low income persons, and other underserved groups within the United States. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

HPE 4551/5551 (410:151g). Nutrition for Health Promotion — 3 hrs.

For junior, senior, and graduate students in health promotion, as well as pre- and para-medical students to provide basic knowledge of the fundamentals of nutrition, related diseases/conditions, and current nutritional issues encountered by health professionals. Priority given to 410, 420, and 430 majors. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Spring)

HPE 4580/5580 (410:180g). Environmental Health, Field Methods, Technology, and Laboratory Applications — 3 hrs.

Strives to develop understanding and working knowledge of the basic tools of environmental health research and field methods. Students will develop skills and competencies related to basic laboratory methods and safety protocols, sampling, types of environmental epidemiology/health research study designs, and the types of mathematical tools employed by researchers practicing and working in this area. Prerequisite(s): STAT 1772 (800:072); junior standing. (Variable)

HPE 4663/5663 (410:163g). Human Diseases — 3 hrs.

Systemic approach to study of human diseases emphasizing common physical disorders afflicting humans while contrasting normal physiology with the pathophysiology of the conditions. Current trends in diagnosis and treatment, along with preventive and wellness measures, are stressed. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

HPE 4665/5665 (410:165g). Environmental Health Science — 3 hrs.

Comprehensive survey of the interaction between human health and the quality and state of the natural environment. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as ENV SCI 4665/5665 (830:165g)) (Fall)

HPE 4666/5666 (410:166g). Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations — 3 hrs.

Overview of environmental and occupational safety laws applied to the practice of environmental science. Emphasis on application of the legislation with a focus on regulations. Includes major environmental laws such as the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as ENV SCI 4666/5666 (830:166g)) (Odd Springs)

HPE 4667/5667. Human Toxicology for Environmental and Occupational Health: Principles and Applications — 3 hrs.

This course introduces the basic principles of human toxicology for the environmental health sciences, including exposure assessment concepts, biomolecular and human biosystems impacts of toxicants with detailed studies of key toxins. The review includes discussions of limiting exposures and cutting edge topics in toxicology. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2051 (840:051); BIOL 2052 (840:052); CHEM 1110 (860:044); CHEM 1120 (860:048); junior standing. (Fall)

HPE 4768 (410:168). Field Experience in Health Promotion — 3-12 hrs.

3, 6, 9, or 12 hrs. Experience in area of student's career objectives. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): HPE 3693 (410:193); senior standing; 2.50 cumulative GPA; consent of Division of Health Promotion and Education Coordinator of Student Field Experiences. CPR, First Aid, OSHA and Mandatory Reporting certificates required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 6220 (410:220). Health Determinants — 3 hrs.

Students will integrate current research, theory, and empirical evidence to develop a better understanding of the determinants of health. Examines social, environmental, and individual determinants of health, and explores the linkages and pathways through which these factors operate. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Health Education or Public Health, or consent of instructor. (Variable)

HPE 6245 (410:295). Internship in Health Education — 2-6 hrs.

Health program experience with agencies other than the college or university. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): consent of Division of Health Promotion and Education Graduate Coordinator. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 6271 (410:271). Cardiovascular Physiology — 3 hrs.

In-depth study of the functioning of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems in the diseased and non-diseased state. Major topics include functional anatomy, cardiorespiratory control, arterial pressure, responses to exercise, electrical activity, and the effects of disease processes. (Same as PEMES 6271 (420:271)) (Variable)

HPE 6285 (410:285). Readings — 1-4 hrs.

May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 6289 (410:289). Seminar — 1 hr.

May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. (Variable)

HPE 6297 (410:297). Practicum — 2-3 hrs.

May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 6299 (410:299). Research.

Fee assessed separately for laboratory materials and/or binding of thesis/research paper. Prerequisite(s): consent of department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

HPE 6390 (410:290). Philosophy and Ethics of Public Health and Health Promotion — 3 hrs.

Analysis of philosophical foundations and ethical principles related to public health, health promotion, and health education practice. (Variable)

HPE 7320 (410:320). Theoretical Foundations of Community and Public Health Education — 3 hrs.

Theoretical approaches to behavior change in community and public health research and practice; includes factors influencing health behaviors, ethical issues, behavioral interventions, and consideration for special populations. (Variable)

HPE 7389 (410:389). Health Promotion and Education Seminar — 1 hr.

Explores various aspects of the Health Promotion and Education graduate program, career responsibilities, and the completion of the dissertation. Intent is to increase understanding of the graduate education process and provide a forum for discussing research topics. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): doctoral status. (Variable)

Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, Interdepartmental Courses

Kinesiology, Allied Health, and Human Services, Interdepartmental Courses

KAHHS 1020. Dimensions of Wellbeing Lecture — 1 hr.

Overall, the Dimensions of Wellbeing course is designed to prepare students for healthy, proactive lifestyles through lecture, experiential learning, and various physical and wellbeing activities. The core dimensions of wellbeing for the purposes of this course include: physical, emotional, interpersonal, intellectual, spiritual, and environmental wellbeing. The lecture sections of Dimensions are designed to provide an underlying knowledge base for specific wellness topics and themes with a unifying emphasis on how these dimensions are intertwined and linked to overall quality of life. Specific health consumerism and health behavior change topics are also covered across the spectrum of Dimensions of Wellbeing course offerings. This course may not be repeated for additional credit. If a student has already satisfied this portion of the LAC Category 1D Dimensions of Wellbeing, it will be considered a repeat. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

KAHHS 1030. Dimensions of Wellbeing Lab — 1 hr.

Overall, the Dimensions of Wellbeing course is designed to prepare students for healthy, proactive lifestyles through lecture, experiential learning, and various physical and wellbeing activities. The core dimensions of wellbeing for the purposes of this course include: physical, emotional, interpersonal, intellectual, spiritual, and environmental wellbeing. The laboratory sections of Dimensions are designed to apply specific skill-related knowledge, encourage healthy active lifestyles, and motivate students to learn and practice skills related to a wide spectrum of activities and experiences related to wellbeing dimensions. This course may not be repeated for additional credit. If a student has already satisfied this portion of the LAC Category 1D Dimensions of Wellbeing, it will be considered a repeat. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

KAHHS 2045. Health and Physical Education for Elementary Teachers — 3 hrs.

Methods and materials in health education and physical education appropriate for children. No credit for students with credit in HPE 3135 or PEMES 2045 (420:045). No credit given to Physical Education or Health Education majors or minors. Prerequisite(s): EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030). (Fall and Spring)

KAHHS 6210. Quantitative Methods in KAHHS — 3 hrs.

Practical statistical applications commonly used in athletic training, health promotion and education, physical education, and leisure, youth and human services with a focus on the analysis and interpretation of data through the use of computer software packages. (Fall and Spring)

KAHHS 6215. Qualitative Methods — 3 hrs.

Application of qualitative methods of data collection and analysis to topics in athletic training, health promotion and education, physical education, and leisure, youth and human services. Prerequisite(s): SPED 6293 (220:293) or equivalent. (Variable)

KAHHS 6290. Research Methods for KAHHS — 3 hrs.

Introduction to processes of research in health, physical education, and leisure services with an emphasis on critical analysis of literature, and identification of viable research projects. (Fall and Spring)

KAHHS 7329. Research and Evaluation Seminar — 1-6 hrs.

One hour taken each semester for six semesters for total of 6 hours. Applied approach to research and evaluation. Students plan and implement research and evaluation projects in athletic training, health promotion and education, youth development, leisure, and/or human services settings, working with teams of faculty and other students. Course content includes research methods, statistics, and writing for publication. Prerequisite(s): doctoral standing or consent of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

KAHHS 7365. Field Experience — 1-6 hrs.

Practical experience in leisure, youth and human services, health promotion and education, or athletic training. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours with consent of student's advisor and graduate committee. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

KAHHS 7395. Internship — 1-6 hrs.

Practical experience in leisure, youth and human services with community agencies. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours with consent of student's advisor and graduate committee. Prerequisite(s): Consent of graduate committee. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

KAHHS 7410. Critical Theories and Practices I — 3 hrs.

In-depth examination of current theories, philosophical foundations, history and current practices relevant to the allied health, recreation and community services fields. Building on foundational theory courses, students analyze and critique the organization and design of allied health, recreation and community services programs, based on setting and ideological model, in the U.S. and around the world. Students develop praxis design principles consistent with the developmental, normative focus of informal and formal education. Recommended for second year students. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Variable)

KAHHS 7412. Critical Theories and Practices II — 3 hrs.

Second course in a two-course sequence that surveys allied health, recreation and community services practices and theories in a wide variety of out-of-school and co-curricular settings. Covers theories, models, and best practices in the delivery of services. Students analyze and critique the organization and design of allied health, recreation and community services programs, based on setting and ideological model, in the U.S. and around the world. Students develop praxis design principles consistent with the developmental normative focus of informal and formal education. Recommended for third year students. Prerequisite(s): KAHHS 7410. (Variable)