2017-18 Academic Catalog
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Undergraduate Information and Degree Requirements

The University of Northern Iowa offers degrees at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Graduate information is provided in the Graduate Degree Requirements, and specific graduate major program requirements are listed within the Program Requirements section by department. At the undergraduate level, the University of Northern Iowa offers four traditional baccalaureate degrees: the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Fine Arts, the Bachelor of Music, and the Bachelor of Science. The university also offers two additional baccalaureate degrees: the Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree which offers  educational opportunities to those students who have completed an A.A.S. degree and are now seeking to complete a four-year degree. These students are often place-bound and need to take online classes while remaining a full-time employee. The external degree of Bachelor of Liberal Studies is also offered by UNI, and details of this unique degree program are provided in this University Catalog. Major goals in the programs leading to these degrees are the advancement of humane learning and the preparation of all students to cope intelligently, effectively, and reasonably with the complex and changing conditions of life in modern society. To attain these goals, while at the university, students are expected to make significant progress toward:

  1. understanding themselves and the society in which they live,
  2. developing the ability to read, write, and speak their own language well and to appreciate its literature,
  3. gaining an acquaintance with the literature of another language and the culture of its people, preferably in the original, but certainly through the study of translations,
  4. securing a thorough grounding in the history and cultural traditions of the modern world with a special sympathetic understanding for the economic, social, and political problems of our time,
  5. acquiring an understanding of the principles and methods of the natural sciences and mathematics and the part they play in modern society,
  6. developing the ability to perceive the values of the arts and derive an enjoyment from them,
  7. acquiring a knowledge of how to care for their own health and physical environment and to take an intelligent interest in the health and welfare of the community in which they live, and
  8. growing in the desire to secure knowledge.

To achieve these ends, students are obliged to take a variety of courses drawn from among the arts, humanities, philosophy, mathematics, and language, and from among the biological, physical, and social sciences. Concentration in a major field enables students to engage in intensive study, to think for themselves, and to exercise discriminating judgment. It prepares the student for more advanced work if s(he) decides to go on to graduate school, or for immediate employment. This emphasis on the academic program is not to exclude the contributions made by other parts of the university life to the substantial development of a student's personality - social and athletic activities, public speaking and dramatic arts, music, art, public affairs, or other programs.

The desired result of these degree programs is not an individual who conforms to society as it is or sees her/his own vocation within the narrow confines of the day-to-day occupation, but rather a person enriched in mind and spirit and so stimulated that this person will seek with eagerness to contribute to the benefit of the world in which s(he) lives. Such a program is desirable for all students whatever their future professions may be.

All credit hours stated in this catalog, for a program, assume students have appropriate preparatory course work. If a student's preparation is inadequate, additional course work may be necessary and may extend the length of the program and the time required to complete graduation requirements.

For those who plan to become teachers, additional work is required in professional education. This work seeks to enhance the student's interest in and commitment to teaching, to instill loyalty toward the profession, and to encourage the desire for continuous professional growth. The student acquires the skills, techniques, and understanding necessary to good teaching by studying current knowledge concerning the physical, emotional, and mental growth of children and youth, the ways that they learn, and methods for guiding them to reach full potential. As part of her/his preparation, the student explores the mutual relationships and responsibilities of the teacher, the school, and the community.

The prospective teacher must also spend a significant part of her/his time in the area of learning chosen for concentration. The student's mastery of the subject matter of this area, its closely-related fields, and the skills and professional dispositions needed to present it effectively are essential aspects of successful teaching.

The teacher preparation program requires more hours to complete than many of the other programs in order to include the necessary professional work and to approximate, as far as possible in a four-year period, the other major goals previously listed. Students completing the teacher preparation program are strongly encouraged to continue their education beyond the bachelor's degree.

Declaration of Major

Academic Advisement Report

The choice of major should be made as early as possible in the student's university career in order to complete the program and fulfill requirements for graduation. The student is assigned an advisor at orientation based on the major indicated at that time. Those students who are pre-majors, and students adding or changing a major, indicate this in the major department on a Declaration of Curriculum form and a new advisor is assigned. The form is filed with the Office of the Registrar.

Degree-seeking, first baccalaureate students are eligible for an Academic Advisement Report. This is prepared by the Office of the Registrar and made available to the student in their Student Center. Changes in the student's declared major or minor are reflected on the Academic Advisement Report upon processing.

Undergraduate Curricula

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Two programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree are available.

A. Bachelor of Arts - Teaching Program - 120 semester hours

Note: Programs requiring more than 120 semester hours to graduate (see major requirements) are identified and may include up to 144 semester hours.

On this program students are prepared as:

  1. Secondary teachers of art, business, biology, chemistry, communications, earth science, English, industrial arts, mathematics, music, physical education, physics, science, social science subjects (economics, history, etc.), spanish, and speech.
  2. Special teachers of art, industrial arts, music, physical education, special education, and speech.
  3. Early childhood and elementary teachers (kindergarten through sixth grade).
  4. Middle level education teachers in various areas of instruction.

B. Bachelor of Arts - 120 semester hours

Note: Programs requiring more than 120 semester hours (see major requirements) are identified.

On this program students are prepared in the following areas:

  1. Liberal Arts - accounting, applied human sciences, art, biology, business, chemistry and biochemistry, communications, computer science, criminology, economics, English, finance, health, leisure services, management, marketing, mathematics, music, philosophy, physical education, physics, psychology, spanish, speech, social science, social work, science, technology, and theatre.
  2. Program for Registered Nurses
    A student certified or licensed as a registered nurse (R.N.) may be recommended for a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in General Studies in accordance with the following provisions:
    1. A student who has taken the work required for certification or licensure, including the successful completion of required agency examinations, will have 34-45 semester hours accepted for transfer to apply on the bachelor's degree. Such work may have been earned in a two-year associate degree program or in an approved hospital diploma program.
      These hours of transfer work may be affected by a general university requirement that a maximum of 65 semester hours may be accepted from a two-year institution. The 34-45 semester hours of transfer credit for R.N. certification is considered part of this limit. Thus, a student who has earned more than 20 semester hours of other two-year college credit may not be able to use all of the nursing credits for graduation requirements. Such individuals should consult the Director of Admissions concerning the application of this requirement in her/his situation.
    2. Eleven of the total number of semester hours accepted as advanced standing for R.N. certification are applied to Liberal Arts Core requirements in the areas of biology, chemistry, and interpersonal relationships. Specifically, the 11 hours would be dispersed in the following way:
      1. Category 4. Natural Science and Technology
        1. Life Sciences - 3 hrs.
        2. Physical Sciences - 3 hrs.
      2. Category 5. Social Science
        1. Group A (1 course) - 2-3 hrs.
        2. Group B (1 course) - 2-3 hrs.

          One course from Group A, B, or C is required.

          The student will be held to courses required in the remaining Liberal Arts Core categories.
    3. The student shall complete a minimum of 15 hours of upper-level courses from each of two of the four colleges for a total of 30 hours. The student's program will be planned in consultation with the Individual Studies Program Coordinator.
       As an alternative to item c, the student may complete the requirements for a major offered by any department and graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in the chosen major.
    4. A student may not earn duplicate credit for courses taken at another institution and judged to be equivalent.
    5. The student shall earn enough credit in elective courses to have a total of 120 hours of academic credit.
    6. This program is under the jurisdiction and general supervision of Individual Studies. Students entering this program will confer with the Program Coordinator.
      This degree program is not recommended for students intending to work in nursing education at the collegiate level, in such areas as public health, or psychiatric nursing, nor those for whom the primary intention is graduate work in nursing.
  3. Joint Program
    Students interested in one of the following professional programs may complete the basic work on the University of Northern Iowa campus and transfer to UNI a year's credit from the professional school to complete the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree at UNI:
    • Chiropractic
    • Medical Laboratory Sciences
    • Nursing 3+1

A student shall complete at UNI all the requirements in the Liberal Arts Core (45 semester hours) and the requirements for the B.A. (Joint Program Option) in Biology and have a total of at least 90 semester hours at UNI. The professional courses transferred must bring the total hours to at least 120 semester hours. Credit is accepted only from professional schools which are fully accredited. Details of the B.A. (Joint Program Option) are available from the Biology Department.

The student must know the requirements for entrance to the professional school so as to be able to take at the University of Northern Iowa the work required for admission while at the same time meeting UNI degree requirements. The student will work with the Biology Department advisor who will help in the selection of proper courses.

Acceptance of credit from professional schools of chiropractic and medical technology toward meeting part of degree requirements:

A student who has completed three years or more of college work with a minimum of 90 semester hours, of which at least the last 30 hours of work were completed at the University of Northern Iowa before admission to an accredited professional college, may use professional credit to satisfy the remaining hours required for the baccalaureate degree at the University of Northern Iowa. The student shall have completed all of the specific requirements for the B.A. (Joint Program Option).

C. Other Programs

  1. Pre-professionalGuide sheets are available to assist a student with considering courses at UNI in preparation for pursing further schooling in the areas of chiropractic, dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and veterinary medicine. These program guides may be requested from the Office of Admissions or visit the website www.uni.edu/advising/pre-professional-guidesheets.  Please note that these are recommendations only.  A student should contact an institution directly or visit their web site for complete and current course and/or admission requirements.
  2. Cooperative Programs

    1. The University of Northern Iowa offers prerequisite coursework for students planning to apply for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at Allen College, Waterloo, IA or at other nursing programs.  Allen College has a cooperative agreement with UNI for students admitted into the nursing program. 

    2.  Dual degree program in Nursing in cooperation with Allen College in Waterloo, IA.  The first three-years of required coursework in sciences and liberal arts are completed at UNI.  The student then will complete nursing courses through the accelerated program at Allen College.  When finished, a student will have a Bachelor of Nursing form Allen College and either a bachelor’s degree in Biology or in Individual Studies – Health Sciences.

    3. The University of Northern Iowa offers prerequisite coursework for students planning to apply for allied health programs at Allen College, Waterloo, IA in Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Nuclear Medicine Technology, and Clinical Laboratory Technology.  In addition, Allen College has a cooperative agreement with UNI for students admitted into the radiography program.

    4. Dual degree program in Medical Laboratory Sciences in cooperation with Allen College in Waterloo, IA and St. Luke’s Hospital in Cedar Rapids, IA.  The first three-years of required coursework in sciences and liberal arts are completed at UNI. During the fourth year, medical technology courses are finished at either Allen College or St. Luke’s Hospital.  When finished, a student will have a bachelor’s degree in Biology from UNI and a bachelor of Health Sciences from the Medical Laboratory Sciences institution.

    5. Dual degree program in chiropractic medicine with Logan College of Chiropractic, Chesterfield, MO; Palmer College of Chiropractic, Davenport, IA; and Cleveland University – Chiropractic & Health Sciences, Overland Park KS. The first three-years of required coursework in liberal arts and sciences are completed at UNI.  After one-year of satisfactory completion of chiropractic coursework at the cooperating institution, UNI will award a bachelor’s degree in Biology.  The student will then complete the three additional years of required chiropractic coursework to earn a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) from the cooperating program.

    6. Dual-degree program in physics and engineering in cooperation with Iowa State University (ISU). The first three years of coursework in liberal arts and physics are completed at UNI. During the fourth and fifth years, engineering courses are completed at ISU.  When finished, a student will have a bachelor’s degree in Physics from UNI and bachelor’s degree in Engineering from ISU. 

    A student who expects to transfer to another institution should declare her/his special interest at the time of admission. The student will be assigned to an advisor who is familiar with the type of program being sought.

    Before seeing her/his advisor for the first time, the student should secure a current copy of the catalog of the school to which the transfer is planned.

  3. Community College Partnerships
    Several statewide partnerships exist. The A.A. degree from all Iowa community colleges fulfills themajority of the Liberal Arts requirements at UNI. The reverse transfer agreement allows students to complete their A.A. degree after transferring by using UNI courses to complete the A.A. degree.
    The Admissions Partnership Program provides students enrolled at the community college an adviser from UNI to help plan a course of study at the community college. In addition, other partnerships, also known as articulation agreements, have been developed between UNI and all Iowa community colleges for particular UNI baccalaureate degree programs. These agreements show specific courses that need to be taken at each school to complete a program. If available, an articulation agreement typically results in the quickest route to graduation for a transfer student.
    Additionally, UNI has developed a 2+2 program. Students in this program earn an A.A. degree from a community college or have completed a similar set of courses at another institution and the UNI portion of a 2+2 program is offered at the community college for students who are place bound or career changing. These include B.A. degrees in elementary education teaching and early childhood education endorsement. Called a 2+2 program, the time to complete a degree may take more than four years depending on individual circumstances.
    For more information contact the UNI Office of Admissions, Cedar Falls, IA; phone 319-273-2281.
     

Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)

1.      The Four-Year Program
The Army ROTC Four-Year Program consists of two parts: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. 

The Basic Course is usually taken during the freshman and sophomore years. Students taking a Basic Course class do not incur a military service obligation (except for scholarship students). The Basic Course teaches the student leadership, oral and written communication skills, team building, survival skills, and basic soldier skills. There is no prerequisite that the basic courses be taken in sequence; however, a student must complete the basic course or the equivalent (see paragraph 2. below), before progressing into the advanced course.
The Advanced Course is usually taken during the junior and senior years. Students enrolled and contracted in the Advanced Course will incur a military obligation (either active or reserve). The Advanced Course teaches the student about small unit tactics, leadership, ethics, management of military organizations and resources, as well as military law. The Department of the Army will pay all contracted cadets up to $5,000 a year during the last two years of the program.

2.      Alternatives to the Basic Course Program
The alternatives to the Basic Course are designed specifically to fill the needs of the students who did not take Army ROTC during the first two years. Placement credit for the basic course may be obtained in several ways. The most common methods are prior military service, enlisted basic training, or successful completion of the four-week summer ROTC Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET).  With credit gained through an alternative to the basic course, students must have two academic years remaining in order to complete the Advanced Course. 

3.      ROTC Scholarships
U.S. Army ROTC has two-, three- and four-year merit based scholarships available to qualified cadets. They pay 100% of tuition and required fees at UNI or a $10,000 year room and board allowance.  These scholarships also provide $600 per semester for textbooks, supplies, and equipment and a subsistence allowance of up to $5,000 for each school year that the scholarships are in effect. Winning and accepting an ROTC scholarship does not preclude accepting other scholarships. Additional ROTC scholarship information is contained in this University Catalog.

4.      The Simultaneous Membership Program
The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) allows contracted cadets to be members of the Iowa Army National Guard or the Army Reserve and Army ROTC simultaneously.
ROTC SMP cadets are paid at the rate of a Sergeant (E-5) for their one weekend a month training assemblies.  They also can receive up to $5,000 a year subsistence allowance from the ROTC Advanced Course and may also qualify for G.I. Bill educational assistance benefits.  SMP cadets can also compete for two and three year scholarships available specifically for them. 

5.      Military Science Minor
The Military Science Department offers a minor in Military Science. Requirements for the minor are 33-39 hours and include Military Science courses as well as elective courses. More information is contained in this University Catalog.

6.      Additional Information
Additional information regarding the U.S. Army ROTC program is contained under the section titled Military Science in this University Catalog. The specific courses offered by the Department of Military Science are listed under the Department of Military Science in the course description section. For additional information, write to the University of Northern Iowa, Department of Military Science, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0142; come in person to West Gym (Room 203), UNI campus; or call the student advisor at 319-273-6178 or 319-273-6225. Please visit our website www.uni.edu/rotc.

Bachelor of Arts - Liberal Arts Curricula

A minimum of 120 semester hours is required to complete the B.A. Liberal Arts degree. All candidates on this program will complete the following pattern:

Liberal Arts Core (minimum 44 hours) *44
Major, minor, foreign language, electives76
Total Hours120
*

Programs requiring more than 120 hours are identified (see specific major requirements).

Not later than the beginning of the sophomore year, each student enrolled in this program will choose one major from the list below. A knowledge of a foreign language is required or recommended for several majors. Specific information regarding the foreign language requirements will be found with the departmental listings. It is recommended that the student include in her/his electives a course in the literature of some language or languages other than English (in translation if not in the original).

Majors and Minors

Specific requirements for the various majors and minors will be found with the departmental listings.

Majors

  • Accounting
  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Athletic Training
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Biology: Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Emphasis
  • Biology: Biomedical Emphasis
  • Chemistry
  • Communication
  • Communication/Digital Media
  • Communication/Public Relations
  • Communication Disorders
  • Computer Science
  • Criminology
  • Earth Science
  • Economics
  • English
  • Family Services
  • Finance
  • General Studies
  • General Studies for Registered Nurses
  • Geography
  • Gerontology
  • Global Studies
  • Graphic Design
  • Graphic Technologies
  • Health Promotion
  • History
  • Humanities
  • Individual Studies
  • Interactive Digital Studies
  • Interior Design
  • Leisure, Youth and Human Services
  • Management
  • Management Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics-Statistics/Actuarial Science
  • Movement and Exercise Science
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Communication
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Administration
  • Real Estate
  • Social Work
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Study of Religion
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Technology Management
  • Textile and Apparel
  • Theatre

Minors

  • Accounting
  • Air Quality
  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Art History
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Business Communication
  • Chemistry
  • Communication
  • Communication/Digital Journalism
  • Communication/Public Relations
  • Computer Science
  • Criminology
  • Earth Science
  • Economics
  • Educational Technology
  • Electrical and Electronics Technology (EET)
  • English
  • Environmental Earth Science
  • Ethics
  • Family Studies
  • Finance
  • General Business Concepts
  • Geography
  • Geology
  • Gerontology
  • Graphic Technologies
  • Health Promotion
  • History
  • Interactive Digital Studies
  • Interdisciplinary Language Studies: French
  • International Affairs
  • International Business
  • International Business (non-business majors)
  • Jazz Studies
  • Leisure Services
  • Manufacturing Technology Design
  • Marketing
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics: Statistics and Actuarial Science
  • Mental Health
  • Military Science
  • Music
  • Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
  • Organizational Leadership
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Politics and Law
  • Psychology
  • Public History
  • Real Estate
  • Real Estate-Business
  • Religion
  • Russian and East European Studies
  • Social Welfare
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Spanish/English Translation
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Technology Management
  • Textile and Apparel
  • Theatre
  • Studies in Sexuality, women and Gender
  • Writing

Bachelor of Arts - Teaching Program Curricula

The minimum total hours to graduate with a B.A. Teaching degree is 120 hours. Majors requiring more than 120 semester hours to graduate are identified (see specific major requirements). All candidates pursuing A. B.A. Teaching degree will choose one of the following patterns not later than the beginning of the sophomore year.

A. Preparation for teaching in the secondary school or in special subjects.

Liberal Arts Core (minimum 44 hours) *44
Professional Education Requirement32
Major, minor, electives **44-67
Total Hours120-143

B. Preparation for teaching in the elementary school (kindergarten and grades 1-6).

Liberal Arts Core (minimum 44 hours) *44
Professional Education Requirement33
Major requirements48-53
Area of Specialization ***12
Total Hours137-142

C. Preparation for teaching in early childhood education (birth through grade 3).

Liberal Arts Core (minimum 44 hours) *44
Professional Education Requirement33
Major requirements58-61
Total Hours135-138
*

The required professional education course EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) (Dynamics of Human Development) can also count toward the requirements for the Liberal Arts Core Category 5C.

**

Number of hours determined by declared program area. See appropriate major within Program Requirements section of this catalog for specific requirements.

***

 Liberal Arts Core courses may be counted in the 12-hour area of specialization.

Professional Education Requirements

All candidates selecting a Bachelor of Arts-Teaching program are required to take the courses in professional education and a minimum of one departmental methods course. In addition, all candidates must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

Admission procedures are initiated at a required orientation session during Level I of the Professional Education sequence. Students are strongly encouraged to review teacher education admission information on the Teacher Education website www.uni.edu/teachered.

All students must complete a criminal background check through the Office of Teacher Education (319-273-2265; www.uni.edu/teachered) prior to entering PK-12 school buildings to work with pupils. Teacher candidates will be issued a certificate indicating completion of this background check process that they should carry with them to all field experiences. All students should complete training in universal precautions related to bloodborne pathogens (HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C) prior to the start of their first field experience. This training is provided in the first few weeks of the fall and spring semesters. Students can also complete the training on their own in the Instructional Resources and Technology Services Center (Schindler Education Center 222; www.uni.edu/coe/about/centers-and-services/irts.

SPED 3150 (220:150)Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners in Classrooms *2
INSTTECH 1020 (240:020)Secondary Educational Technology and Design2-3
or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031) Educational Technology and Design
TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g)Human Relations: Awareness and Application **3
Level I
TEACHING 2017Level 1 Field Experience: Exploring Teaching1
EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030)Dynamics of Human Development3
Level II ***
TEACHING 3128Level 2 Field Experience: Teacher as a Change Agent1
EDPSYCH 3148 (200:148)Learning and Motivation in Classroom Contexts3
MEASRES 3150 (250:150)Classroom Assessment2
Level III
SOCFOUND 3119 (260:119)Schools and American Society3
Student Teaching (280:1xx) (course number denotes area in which experience is gained) 12
Early Childhood Teaching
Elementary Teaching
Special Education Teaching
Middle School/Junior High Teaching
Secondary School Teaching
Vocational/Technical Teaching
Special Area Teaching: Art, ESL, Music, and Physical Education
Advanced Laboratory Practice
Total Hours32-33
*

Prerequisite: EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) or equivalent. Course EDPSYCH 2030 (200:030) may be used to satisfy Category 5C of the Liberal Arts Core.

**

Before enrolling in TEACHING 4170/5170 (280:170g), the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

***

Before enrolling in Level II, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher.

Before enrolling in Level III, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program and have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher.

Before enrolling in Student Teaching, the student must be fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program, have completed Level II and Level III field experiences, and meet all GPA requirements.

Program admission and completion may include requirements and evaluations/assessments prescribed by the major, the Teacher Education Program, the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners and/or the Iowa Department of Education. Changes resulting from decisions made by the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners and/or the Iowa Department of Education can occur at any time and be binding upon both current and incoming students.

Professional Education Waivers/Substitutions

  1. Technology Education majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) . A student changing to a different education major from Technology Education may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  2. Physical Education majors may substitute PEMES 3174 (420:174) for MEASRES 3150 (250:150). A Physical Education major changing to a different education major from Physical Education may be required to complete MEASRES 3150 (250:150) .
  3. Physical Education majors will be waived from SPED 3150 (220:150). A student changing to a different education major from Physical Education would be required to complete SPED 3150 (220:150) .
  4. Music Education majors will be waived from MEASRES 3150 (250:150). A student changing to a different education major from Music Education would be required to complete MEASRES 3150 (250:150) .
  5. Music Education majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from Music Education may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  6. Art Education majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from Art Education may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  7. Secondary science teaching majors (Science Education, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics) will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) . A student changing to a different education major from Science Education, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  8. Secondary business education teaching majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from business education may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  9. Secondary modern language education majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from modern language may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  10. Secondary mathematics teaching majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from mathematics may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  11. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) teaching majors and TESOL/Modern Language teaching majors will be waived from INSTTECH 1020 (240:020). A student changing to a different education major from TESOL or TESOL/Modern Languages may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.
  12. Early Childhood Education majors will be waived from MEASRES 3150 (250:150). A student changing to a different education major from Early Childhood Education would be required to complete MEASRES 3150 (250:150).
  13. Physical Education majors may substitute PEMES 2031 “Teaching Physical Education with Technology” for  INSTTECH 1031 (240:031). A student changing to a different education major from Physical Education  may be required to complete INSTTECH 1020 (240:020) or INSTTECH 1031 (240:031), depending upon the new major.

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

To be admitted to the Teacher Education Program, a student must fulfill the following requirements prior to registration for Level II courses:

  1. declare a teaching major;
  2. earn at least 24 semester hours of credit;
  3. earn at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA;
  4. file an acceptable Application for Admission to Teacher Education (available: SEC 159A or online at www.uni.edu/teached);
  5. complete ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research or the equivalent with a grade of C- (1.67) or better (effective January 1, 2009, see note below)**;
  6. complete COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication or the equivalent with a grade of C- (1.67) or better (effective January 1, 2009, see note below)**;
  7. complete the Liberal Arts Core Category 1: Core Competency C (Quantitative Techniques and Understanding) math course (or equivalent) with a grade of C- (1.67) or better (effective January 1, 2009, see note below);
  8. receive the required minimum scores on the UNI designated pre-professional skills exam over mathematics, reading, and writing and receive any required total score or better across all required sections of the required pre-professional skills exam*;
  9. demonstrate Acceptable Dispositions (absence of any Notification of Concern)
  10. fulfill any additional requirements as prescribed by the Teacher Education Program, the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners, or the Iowa Department of Education.
*

 For more information, contact the Office of Teacher Education (319-273-2265) or consult the Teacher Education website www.uni.edu/teachered.

**

 Teaching majors taking UNIV 1059 First Year Cornerstone must earn a C- or better in both semesters in order to meet these two admission standards. Teaching majors who earn less than a C- in the first semester Cornerstone course or in the second semester Cornerstone course will be required to take COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication and ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research in order to meet the admission requirements for Teacher Education.

Note: Courses completed as part of A.A., B.A., B.S., or other degree may not be actual equivalents of UNI Liberal Arts Core courses, and thus may not meet the requirements specific in 5, 6, and 7 above. Students who do not have equivalent courses will need to take additional course work to meet these three requirements.

All teacher education candidates are strongly encouraged to pursue additional opportunities for experience working with children and adolescents throughout their teacher education program through paid employment and/or volunteer activities.

Admission to the Teacher Education Program is a privilege rather than a right. Thus, admission to the Program is not guaranteed to all who apply. Students may appeal the decision to deny admittance to the Teacher Education Program or the decision to place them on academic probation in the Teacher Education Program when the decision is based on extreme circumstances over which the student has no control. In such cases, the student should contact the Coordinator of Elementary Teacher Education or the Coordinator of Secondary Teacher Education Programs to set up an appointment to begin the appeal process.

UNI Teacher Education majors are expected to keep an active e-mail account, using the ____@uni.edu address and to check this address at least twice weekly.

Information concerning fee payments for tests, registration procedures, and test dates are available by contacting:

Office of Teacher Education
152 Schindler Education Center (SEC)
UNI
319-273-2265

or

Examination Services
007 Innovative Teaching and Technology Center (ITTC)
UNI
319-273-6023

Field and Clinical Experiences

At the University of Northern Iowa experiences in teaching and the observation of teaching are an integral part of the Teacher Education curriculum. The emphasis on experimentation and creative approaches gives the student insight into turning theory into practice. Professional experiences include field experiences and participation, with supervised observations, that culminate in the actual period of student teaching.

Supervised observations give the student an opportunity to see the teaching-learning process without becoming involved in the on-going activity itself. In the field experiences, the student takes an active part in the teaching-learning situation or other community activities under the direction and guidance of a qualified professional.

Student involvement in all of the field and clinical experiences in teacher education is vital to the preparation of the prospective teacher. Observation and participation experiences are provided through specific courses in the Professional Education Sequence and through individual departments offering teaching majors. These experiences give the student the background needed to make professional course work and student teaching more meaningful.

All students must complete a criminal background check through the Office of Teacher Education (319-273-2265; www.uni.edu/teachered) prior to entering PK-12 school buildings to work with pupils. Teacher candidates will be issued a certificate indicating completion of this background check process that they should carry with them to all field experiences. All students should complete training in universal precautions related to blood borne pathogens (HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C) prior to the start of their first field experience. This training is provided in the first few weeks of the fall and spring semesters. Students can also complete the training on their own in the Instructional Resources and Technology Services Center (Schindler Education Center 222; www.uni.edu/coe/about/centers-and-services/irts.

Student Teaching

Student teaching is a period of guided teaching which is a full semester in length. During this time, the student assumes increasing responsibility for the teaching-learning activities in the classroom. The student receives twelve (12) semester hours of credit for student teaching, evaluated on a credit/no-credit/withdrawal system. Interinstitutional student teachers who enroll at UNI, including those on the Regents' Universities Student Exchange Program, may be evaluated on a graded basis (e.g., A, B, C, D, F) upon written request at the time of application from the Registrar of the home institution.

To be admitted to student teaching, a student must have:

  1. FULL admission to the teacher education program;
  2. a certificate in High Risk Behaviors/Substance Abuse; Mandatory Reporter of Child Abuse; OSHA Universal Precautions Standards Training;
  3. a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher on work at all colleges and universities;
  4. a UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher;
  5. a 2.50 GPA in the appropriate academic department or department approval;
  6. a grade of C- (1.67) or higher in each Professional Education Sequence course and a GPA of 2.50 or higher across all such courses;
  7. completion of all methods courses listed as prerequisites for student teaching with a grade of C (2.00) or higher as well as other departmental requirements;
  8. Mathematics majors are required to have a major GPA of 2.50 or higher AND departmental approval; and
  9. Health Education and Physical Education majors and minors are required to have current First Aid and CPR certification prior to student teaching.

The final student teacher assignment is based upon fulfillment of all established requirements stated above, successful completion of Level II and Level III field experiences (and a  minimum of 80 contact hours in PK-12 schools), acceptable professional dispositions, and availability of placement.

Exit Requirements

To be recommended for teaching licensure in Iowa, a student who graduates from the UNI Teacher Education Program must satisfactorily complete all courses in the major and/or minor and the teacher education requirements, have an overall GPA of 2.50 and a cumulative UNI GPA of 2.50, submit fingerprint and waiver cards for mandated background checks, and pass additional exit requirements as may be prescribed by the major, the Teacher Education Program, the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners and/or the Iowa Department of Education. A student not meeting these requirements may graduate but will not receive recommendation for licensure.

Many states, including Iowa, now require successful completion of designated examinations to receive a teaching license. Information concerning fee payments for tests, registration procedures, and test dates are available by contacting:

Office of Teacher Education
152 Schindler Education Center (SEC)
UNI
319-273-2265
or

Examination Services
007 Innovative Teaching and Technology Center (ITTC)
UNI
319-273-6023

Additional information on teacher licensure is provided in this University Catalog.

Progressing Through the Teacher Education Program

This section provides an overview of practices that may delay a student from progressing through the Teacher Education Program in a timely fashion.

Four Decision Points are established to mark progression through the Teacher Education Program:

  1. admission to the university,
  2. admission to the Teacher Education Program,
  3. admission to student teaching, and
  4. recommendation for licensure.

Professional Education Faculty members, staff, and/or administrators may delay a student in moving through the Decision Points if a student demonstrates deficiencies in meeting course or Program Standards. To correct the deficiencies, faculty, staff, and/or administrators may file a Notification of Concern, indicating how the student can remedy the deficiency. Only after the deficiencies are resolved may the student expect to move forward in the Program and be recommended for a teaching license.

Suspension from the Teacher Education Program

Any student who has one or more unresolved Notifications of Concern indicating significant deficiencies in meeting the standards for the UNI Teacher Education Program may be considered for suspension from the Program. Suspension from the Program is determined by the Teacher Candidate Professional Review Committee and is for a minimum of one calendar year. Only the most extreme circumstances would warrant consideration for re-admission before one calendar year has elapsed. At the time of suspension, students are informed of the conditions and procedures for re-admission to the Program. Students may appeal their suspension from the Teacher Education Program to the appropriate Teacher Education Senate. Should a student believe a procedural error was made by the Senate during the appeal process, the student may appeal to the Teacher Education Executive Council. Contact the Office of Teacher Education, 319-273-2265, or see www.uni.edu/teachered/appeal for more information.

Emergency Suspension: Any student may be suspended immediately by the Coordinator of Elementary Teacher Education or the Coordinator of Secondary Teacher Education for extreme, unforeseen circumstances such as endangerment of students, disruption of schools/classes, felonious behaviors, or ethical violations. Such suspensions will be referred to university officials and may become permanent.

Re-admission to the Teacher Education Program

Students wishing to be re-admitted to the Teacher Education Program should seek probationary re-admission according to the following schedule: apply by February 1 for Summer and Fall probationary re-admission; apply by October 1 for Spring probationary re-admission. Applications are found at the Office of Teacher Education (SEC 159A).

The decision to re-admit students on a probationary status will be made by the Teacher Candidate Professional Review Committee. Conditions for probationary re-admission are determined on a case-by-case basis by the Committee and in accordance with conditions determined at the time of suspension. Upon successful completion of the probationary period, the Teacher Candidate Professional Review Committee determines conditions for full re-admission and may recommend such to the Council on Teacher Education, which makes the final decision.

Suspension for a second time is considered permanent. Only the most extreme circumstances would warrant consideration for re-admission a second time. Consideration of readmission following a second suspension from the teacher education program is determined by the Teacher Education Executive Council.

Majors and Minors - Teaching

Elementary majors may choose a university-approved endorsement minor (refer to Elementary Education Major for possible choices).

Each student preparing to teach in the secondary school or in a special subject will choose a major not later than the beginning of the sophomore year. The student will also select at least one minor if a minor requirement is indicated under the description of the chosen major. Even if not required, a student may select a second major or one or more minors.

Approved majors and minors will be chosen from the fields listed below.

Majors

  • Art Education
  • Biology
  • Business
  • Chemistry
  • Communication-Theatre
  • Comprehensive Secondary Science
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Earth Science
  • Elementary Education
  • English
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Middle Level Education Dual
  • Middle Level Science Teaching Dual
  • Music Education
  • Physical Education
  • Physics
  • Social Science
  • Spanish
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • TESOL/Modern Language

Note: There is also the Bachelor of Science in Technology and Engineering Education-Teaching major offered by the Department of Technology.

Minors

  • Basic Science (K-8)
  • Biology
  • Coaching
  • Communication-Theatre
  • Early Childhood Special Education
  • Earth Science
  • English
  • Health Education
  • Instructional Technology: Educational Technology
  • Instructional Strategist I: Mild/Moderate K-8 (for students declaring prior to Summer 2014)
  • Instructional Strategist I: Mild/Moderate 5-12 (for students declaring prior to Summer 2014)
  • Instructional Strategist II: Mental Disabilities K-12 (for students declaring prior to Summer 2014)
  • Literacy Education
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics (K-8)
  • Social Studies (K-8)
  • Spanish
  • Spanish (K-8)
  • STEM Education
  • STEM K-8 : 5-8
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Technology Education

Bachelor of Applied Science Degree Program

The purpose of the Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree is to offer educational opportunities to those students who have completed an A.A.S degree and are now seeking to complete a four-year degree.  These students are often place-bound and need to take online classes while remaining a full-time employee.

Admission to the Program

Each student entering the program must have earned:

1.      an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree from an accredited institution; and

2.      a minimum 2.00 grade point average.

Total Credit Requirements

A total of at least 120 semester hours of credit, including applicable transferable credit earned, is required for graduation. The total must fulfill the following specifications:

1.      23-24 hours of Liberal Arts Core classes, as outlined below (of which 9 hours can be transferred in as LAC 1A, 1B, and 1C);

2.      6 hours of Professional Communication, as outlined below;

3.      21-30 hours of Major coursework, from one of the majors listed below;

4.      0-19 hours of elective credit, for a total of 60 semester hours of credit taken at the University of Northern Iowa.

Liberal Arts Core Requirements for B.A.S. Degree*:

Students must meet the following undergraduate Liberal Arts Core requirements as specified below.

Summary:
1. Category 1: Core Competencies in Categories 1A (writing), 1B (speaking), and 1C (math) or transfer equivalencies* 9
*BAS students are permitted to transfer in courses equivalent to Categories 1A, 1B, & 1C. No other classes can be applied to fulfill the LAC portion of the BAS degree.
2. Category 2: Civilizations & Cultures (1 course from Category 2A or 2B)3
3. Category 3: Fine Arts, Literature, Philosophy & Religion (1 course from Category 3A or 3B)3
4. Category 4: Natural Science & Technology (1 course from Category 4A or 4B)3
5. Category 5: Social Science (1 course from Category 5A, 5B, or 5C)3
6. Category 6: Capstone Experience (1 course)(2-3hours or 1 additional course from BAS LAC Category 2, 3, 4, or 5)2-3
Total Hours23-24

Professional Communication Required Courses for B.A.S. Degree

Required:
COMM 3155 (48C:173)Business and Professional Oral Communication3
ENGLISH 3770Technical Writing in Applied Sciences3
Total Hours6

Majors

  • Criminal Justice
  • Managing Business and Organizations
  • Tactical Emergency Services with Vulnerable Populations
  • Technology

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is generally recognized as the professional undergraduate degree in the visual arts. Students are required to pass a portfolio review for admission to the B.F.A. program in the Department of Art. Once admitted, students opt for an emphasis in one of the following studio areas in the Department of Art: ceramics, drawing, graphic design, jewelry design and metalsmithing, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. During their senior year, candidates for this degree are required to present an exhibition of their creative works demonstrating competency in the studio arts. (See Department of Art for detailed information about this program.)

A minimum of 130 semester hours is required to complete the B.F.A. degree. This degree does not provide for licensure to teach; additional hours are necessary to meet licensure requirements.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Curricula

Candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree will complete the following pattern of work:

Art Major
Liberal Arts Core44
Major Requirements78
General Electives8
B.F.A. Senior Exhibition0
Total Hours130

Major

Art: Studio B.F.A.

Bachelor of Music Degree

Majors in this degree program have the choice of an educational major or two professional majors. The Music Education major carries licensure to teach music in grades K-8 and 5-12. The Performance major with emphases in voice, piano, organ, and band-orchestral instruments, and the Composition-Theory major are professional programs designed to prepare students for careers as artist-performers or composers, or for entrance to graduate schools where further excellence in a performance area might be pursued. Students earning the Bachelor of Music degree are prepared as performers, college teachers, and in all areas where a high degree of music or performing skill is required.

Bachelor of Music Degree Curricula

All candidates for the Bachelor of Music degree will complete a pattern similar to the following. A minimum of 120 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Music degree. However, total hours to graduate may range from 120-148 depending on the major chosen (refer to School of Music in this University Catalog for specific major requirements).

Liberal Arts Core41
Music requirements (applied, theory, history and literature, conducting, ensembles, recital, composition, electives)66-80
General electives/professional sequence *0-36

The following majors are offered on this degree program:

Composition-Theory79
Music Education (teaching) (66, 67, or 77 hours)66-77
Performance (voice, piano, organ, band-orchestral instruments)80
*

Music Education majors must also complete the Professional Education Requirements. The minimum semester-hour requirements vary with the specialization chosen. The Music Education major carries licensure to teach in grades K-8 and 5-12.

The approval of the faculty, and the Associate Director of Undergraduate Music Programs of the School of Music must be secured before a student is admitted formally to this degree program. All students who have been admitted to the school and wish to pursue a music major curriculum must undertake a common core of required courses during the freshman year. During the second semester of the freshman year, an extensive evaluation of each music major will be conducted. In addition to the entrance audition required of all students who intend to major in music, transfer students are required to take a placement exam in music theory or start with level l in Theory, Aural Training, and Sight Singing. The music faculty will evaluate the performance in these areas to determine School of Music admissibility for each transfer student.

Participation in a Large Ensemble such as band, chorus, orchestra, and other ensembles, is required of all degree students every semester in residence.

(Refer to the School of Music in this University Catalog for additional information.)

Majors

  • Composition-Theory
  • Music Education
  • Performance

Bachelor of Science Degree Curricula

The Bachelor of Science degree should be elected by those students who are preparing for careers in areas where effective application of knowledge and training requires a higher degree of concentration in subject matter and cognate areas, particularly in advanced-level course work. This degree is especially appropriate for students planning post-baccalaureate study in graduate or professional schools.

Since this degree assumes a higher degree of concentration in subject matter, a major leading to this degree will ordinarily require at least eight 100-level* semester hours of credit more than an identically-named major leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. A minimum of 126 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Science degree.

Requirements include:

  1. a minimum of 56 hours in the subject and cognate areas with:
    1. at least 36 hours in the subject area;
    2. at least one 100-level* course in cognate areas;
  2. the completion of undergraduate research or internship carrying 1-2 semester hours of credit applicable to either the subject or cognate area(s). This project should result in the completion of a written report. The major department must certify to the Registrar that the research requirement has been met before the degree is granted;
  3. the completion of the Liberal Arts Core requirements selected from courses included in the six Liberal Arts Core categories.
*

See course descriptions for 4-digit numbers (implemented Fall 2011) associated with 100-level courses.

Majors

  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Construction Management
  • Electrical Engineering Technology (EET)
  • Geography: Geographic Information Science
  • Manufacturing Engineering Technology
  • Networking and System Administration
  • Physics
  • Technology and Engineering Education-Teaching*

* This is the only Bachelor of Science teaching major.

Bachelor of Liberal Studies Degree

The Bachelor of Liberal Studies (B.L.S.) program is offered by the three Iowa Regents’ Universities: University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University, and the University of Iowa. The purpose of the B.L.S. is to offer educational opportunities to those students who are unable to attend college as full-time, on-campus students. Students often use guided independent study and other distance learning opportunities to earn credit. This major may not be declared with any other major.

Admission to the Program

Each student entering the program must have earned:

  1. an Associate of Arts degree from an accredited, two-year college, or at least 60 semester hours of college credit acceptable toward graduation at UNI;
  2. a minimum 2.00 grade point average.

Total Credit Requirements

A total of at least 120 semester hours of credit, including transferable credit earned, is required for graduation. The total must fulfill the following specifications:

  1. 45 semester hours of credit earned at four-year colleges in courses defined as upper-level at the colleges in which courses are taken. At the University of Northern Iowa, upper-level courses are those numbered 100* and above;
  2. at least 30 hours of credit earned in the junior and/or senior years in courses at UNI. This total may include nonresidence credit.
*

See course descriptions for 4-digit numbers (implemented Fall 2011) associated with 100-level courses.

Liberal Arts Core Requirements

Students must meet the basic undergraduate core requirements as specified and determined by the policies of the degree-granting institution.

Program Distribution Requirements

To insure sufficient breadth of study, each student's program must include, in addition to the credit used to fulfill the Liberal Arts Core requirements previously stated, a minimum of 12 semester hours of credit in each of the three (3) areas selected from the following list. Of the total 36 semester hours of credit applied to fulfill this requirement, 24 semester hours must be in upper-level credits as defined by the institution in which the courses are taken, with at least 6 semester hours of upper-level credits in each of the three areas chosen.

  1. Humanities
  2. Communications and Arts
  3. Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  4. Social Sciences
  5. Professional fields (such as business, applied human sciences, social work, and education)

Information and details regarding admission to the B.L.S. program, evaluation of prior academic work, program advising, and declaration of major may be obtained from:

Continuing and Distance Education
2637 Hudson Road
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0223

Students may also call the B.L.S. advisor at 1-800-772-1746 or 319-273-2504.

Students are also encouraged to visit the B.L.S. website www.uni.edu/continuinged/bls.

Change of Degree Program

Students who change from one degree program to another will be held for all specific requirements of the program on which they expect to graduate. There will be little difficulty in making such a change if it is made not later than the beginning of the junior year. However, if the change is made later than that, there is no assurance that the student will be able to complete the work required for graduation within a four-year period.

Liberal Arts Core

As stated in the University of Northern Iowa mission statement, the university's undergraduate programs are founded on a strong liberal arts curriculum. The liberal arts experience in the Liberal Arts Core exposes students to the broad areas of knowledge embodied in the whole of the environment and liberates students to further develop the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to live thoughtful, creative, and productive lives. The American Association of Colleges and Universities' "Statement on Liberal Learning" reflects the purposes of UNI’s Liberal Arts Core:

A truly liberal education is one that prepares us to live responsible, productive, and creative lives in a dramatically changing world. It is an education that fosters a well-grounded intellectual resilience, a disposition toward lifelong learning, and an acceptance of responsibility for the ethical consequences of our ideas and actions. Liberal education requires that we understand the foundations of knowledge and inquiry about nature, culture and society; that we master core skills of perception, analysis, and expression; that we cultivate a respect for truth; that we recognize the importance of historical and cultural context; and that we explore connections among formal learning, citizenship, and service to our communities.

We experience the benefits of liberal learning by pursuing intellectual work that is honest, challenging, and significant, and by preparing ourselves to use knowledge and power in responsible ways. Liberal learning is not confined to particular fields of study. What matters in liberal education is substantial content, rigorous methodology and an active engagement with the societal, ethical, and practical implications of our learning. The spirit and value of liberal learning are equally relevant to all forms of higher education and to all students.

Because liberal learning aims to free us from the constraints of ignorance, sectarianism, and short-sightedness, it prizes curiosity and seeks to expand the boundaries of human knowledge. By its nature, therefore, liberal learning is global and pluralistic. It embraces the diversity of ideas and experiences that characterize the social, natural, and intellectual world. To acknowledge such diversity in all its forms is both an intellectual commitment and a social responsibility, for nothing less will equip us to understand our world and to pursue fruitful lives.

The ability to think, to learn, and to express oneself both rigorously and creatively, the capacity to understand ideas and issues in context, the commitment to live in society, and the yearning for truth are fundamental features of our humanity. In centering education upon these qualities, liberal learning is society’s best investment in our shared future.

(The Association of American Colleges and Universities’ “Statement on Liberal Learning,” 1999)

Requirements of the Liberal Arts Core*

(For all Bachelor's degrees - for Liberal Arts Core minimum hours and requirements for the Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree, refer to Bachelor of Applied Science degree in this section.)

Summary (minimum 44 hours* for all students, with the exception of those pursuing B.A.S. degree).

Category 1: Core Competencies *11
Category 2: Civilizations and Cultures9
Category 3: Fine Arts, Literature, Philosophy and Religion6
Category 4: Natural Science and Technology7
Category 5: Social Science9
Category 6: Capstone Experience2
Total Hours44
*

For students admitted to UNI prior to Fall 1994, the Speaking and Listening course included in the Core Competencies category is not required.

Courses

Category 1: Core Competencies    11 hours

Courses in written and oral communication enhance students’ abilities to read and listen critically and to write and speak effectively by attention to how the gathering, analyzing, and presenting of evidence and conclusions can be designed for specific purposes and audiences. Courses in quantitative techniques enhance students’ abilities to use quantitative data effectively and to apply relevant mathematical and statistical concepts and methods to diverse problems and situations. Personal wellness promotes the acquisition of knowledge and the development of skills and attitudes necessary for implementing positive health-related decisions.

A. Reading and Writing3
Select one of the following:
First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I
and First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II (Both UNIV 1000 & UNIV 1010 must be taken to meet LAC Category 1A & 1B.) *
College Writing and Research **
Craft of Academic Writing ***
Critical Writing About Literature ^
B. Speaking and Listening3
First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication I
and First-Year Cornerstone: Integrated Communication II (Both UNIV 1000 & UNIV 1010 must be taken to meet LAC Category 1A & 1B.) *
or
Oral Communication
C. Quantitative Techniques and Understanding #3
Select one of the following:
Modern Tools for Exploring Data
Mathematics in Decision Making
Calculus I
Introduction to Statistical Methods
Introductory Statistics for Life Sciences
Elementary Education students may meet the Category 1C requirement by completing MATH 1204.
D. Dimensions of Wellbeing2
Dimensions of Wellbeing Lecture
Dimensions of Wellbeing Lab
Total Hours11
*

These two courses will be taught in a 2-semester sequence, and a student must successfully complete both UNIV 1000 and UNIV 1010 in their first year of college, or it will not apply to Category 1A/1B credit.

**

ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) recommended for students with ACT English and Reading scores of 18-26.

***

ENGLISH 2015 (620:015) has prerequisite of combined ACT English and Reading scores of 54 or higher.

^

ENGLISH 2120 (620:034) recommended for English majors and minors with prerequisite of ACT English and Reading scores of 54 or higher.

#

Satisfactory score on ALEKS exam or subsequent remediation.

Category 2: Civilizations and Cultures    9 hours

Courses in this category promote an understanding of Western and non-Western cultures and civilizations from ancient times to the present through historical accounts, literatures, philosophies, religions, and fine arts. Using methods of critical inquiry, students explore aspects of human nature, the shaping of thoughts and values, and their interrelations. 

A. Humanities6
Humanities I: The Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Worlds
Humanities II: The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment
Humanities III: The Age of Revolution to the Present
B. Non-Western Cultures3
Russia/Soviet Union
Japan
Latin America
China
India
Middle East
Africa
Native North America
Native Central and South America
SPAN 3020 (780:120) may substitute for the non-Western Cultures requirement.
Total Hours9

 

*

SPAN 3020 (780:120) may substitute for the Non-Western Cultures requirement.


Category 3: Fine Arts, Literature, Philosophy and Religion    6 hours

Courses in this category explore diverse forms of human expression and enhance understanding of how religious, philosophical, literary, and aesthetic ideas and experiences shape and reflect cultures and common patterns of human life. Students will develop knowledge of the complex interplay of culture, history, and human experience through critical examination of ideas and beliefs, ritual and symbol, moral codes and social values, story and poetry, visual art, music, theater, and dance. 

A. Fine Arts *3
Survey of Dance History
The Theatrical Arts and Society
Soundscapes: Music in Culture
Visual Inventions
Visual Perceptions
MUS HIST 1020 (590:002) may substitute for the Fine Arts requirement for all music majors.
THEATRE 3060 (490:135) may substitute for the Fine Arts requirement for all theatre majors.
B. Literature, Philosophy, or Religion3
Literature: (topic)
Religions of the World
Philosophy: The Art of Thinking
Introduction to German Literature in Translation
Total Hours6

Category 4: Natural Science and Technology    7 hours

Courses in natural science promote an understanding of science as a human process that investigates matter and energy acting within complex organic and inorganic systems. Fundamental principles of both physical and life sciences are included.

Students are required to take a course with a scheduled laboratory from either Life Sciences or Physical Sciences or another laboratory course offered by the College Humanities, Arts and Sciences. Only 6 hours are required for students who meet the Liberal Arts Core laboratory requirement with a course other than one listed in Life or Physical Sciences.

A. Life Sciences3-4
Select one of the following:
Human Origins
Life: The Natural World
Life: The Natural World - Lab *
Life: Continuity and Change
Life: Continuity and Change - Lab *
The following major and/or minor courses can substitute for the Life Sciences requirement:
Principles of Microbiology *
General Biology: Organismal Diversity *
General Biology: Cell Structure and Function *
Anatomy and Physiology I *
Inquiry into Life Science *
B. Physical Sciences3
Select one of the following:
Principles of Chemistry *
Molecules and Life *
Astronomy **
Astronomy Laboratory *
Elements of Weather
Elements of Weather Laboratory *
Introduction to Geology *
Physical Geography
Physical Geography Laboratory
Physics in Everyday Life
Conceptual Physics *
Introduction to Sustainability
The following major and/or minor courses can substitute for the Physical Sciences requirement:
Chemical Technology *
General Chemistry I *
General Chemistry I-II *
Fossils and Evolution
General Physics I *
Physics I for Science and Engineering *
Inquiry into Earth and Space Science *
Inquiry into Physical Science *
Total hours7
*

Lab Course.

**

Lab Course if 4-hour option elected.

Category 5: Social Science    9 hours

Courses in this category introduce students to the description and analysis of human behavior from different vantage points, ranging from the societal, cultural, and historical to the institutional and individual perspectives.  There is also a focus on broadening one's understanding of diversity and global issues. In this category, students are exposed to a variety of social science disciplines, and learn how these fields study and analyze human attitudes, behaviors, and relationships.

Required: one course from group A, one course from group B, and one course from group C. 

A. Group A Sociocultural and Historical Perspectives3
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Human Geography
History of the United States
Introduction to Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction
B. Group B Individual and Institutional Perspectives3
Introduction to Economics *
Human Identity and Relationships
Introduction to American Politics
Introduction to Psychology
C. Group C Diversity and Global Issues3
Dynamics of Human Development
World Geography
Contemporary Political Problems
International Relations
Social Problems
Women, Men, and Society
Social Welfare: A World View
American Racial and Ethnic Minorities
Total Hours9

 

*

Satisfactory completion of both ECON 1041 (920:053) and ECON 1051 (920:054) by all non-business majors and Business Teaching majors, through UNI or transfer, may substitute for ECON 1031 (920:024).


Category 6: Capstone Experience    2 hours

Capstone courses provide opportunities for students to synthesize the diverse realms of thought they have studied and to apply the intellectual proficiencies they have acquired. The emphasis is on cultivating life-long learning through linking theory and academic preparation to practical problem-solving activities in multidisciplinary seminars or community-based learning courses.

Prerequisite: junior standing.

The most current list of approved Liberal Arts Core Capstone courses is available in each semester’s Schedule of Classes. Also visit the website www.uni.edu/lac.

Administrative Policies:

  1. Liberal Arts Core courses may be used to satisfy requirements for both the Liberal Arts Core and the major, minor, and program emphases.
  2. Departments offering a Liberal Arts Core course may preclude their major or minor students from taking that particular course to satisfy the requirements for the Liberal Arts Core, the major, or the minor.
  3. Liberal Arts Core requirements can be met through CLEP examinations, departmental examinations, and the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. A student who receives CLEP credit in both the physical and biological sciences shall be considered to have fulfilled the laboratory requirement.
  4. No Liberal Arts Core course may be taken for graduate credit.
  5. No Liberal Arts Core course may have a non-Liberal Arts Core course as a prerequisite.
  6. All courses taken to meet Liberal Arts Core requirements must be taken for graded credit.
  7. The Associate of Arts degree from Iowa community colleges shall continue to be accepted, according to an approved articulation agreement, to meet most Liberal Arts Core requirements.
  8. The Liberal Arts Core requirements apply to all undergraduate degree programs.
  9. Regents Articulation Agreement:
    The University of Northern Iowa, the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Iowa, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Iowa State University agree to accept fulfillment of the Liberal Arts Core at any one of them as equivalent to completion of Liberal Arts Core requirements at another, with the following stipulations:
    1. This agreement does not apply to those students who transfer without having fully completed the Liberal Arts Core prior to transfer.
    2. Validation of fulfillment of Liberal Arts Core requirements requires that a student transferring must have met the transfer requirements of the receiving institution with respect to semester hours and grade point average.
    3. When a foreign language proficiency, a capstone course, and/or a course in foreign culture is required, whether within or in addition to the Liberal Arts Core, a student may meet this requirement at either institution regardless of the institution whose Liberal Arts Core requirements the student fulfills.
    4. Liberal Arts Core validation is the responsibility of the student transferring and will be completed upon request to the Registrar of the institution from which the student is transferring.

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For further information concerning requirements for these certificates see specific departmental listings, or consult with the department listed or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry. Some of the certificates are interdisciplinary and involve several departments; however, only one department or college has been listed as the contact.

Program certificates now available include:

Department of Computer Science

  • Computer Applications Certificate
  • Computer Science Certificate
  • Software Testing Certificate

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

  • Education of the Gifted
  • Instructional Technology Facilitator Certificate
  • Advanced Studies Certificate Literacy Coach
  • Advanced Studies Certificate Reading Recovery Teacher Leader

Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education

  • Advanced Studies Certificate in Educational Leadership
    • Emphasis: Principalship
    • Emphasis: Superintendency Preparation Program

Department of Finance

  • Financial Analysis Certificate

Department of Geography

  • Certificate in Crime Mapping and Analysis (joint coordination with Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology)
  • Certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Cartography

Department of History

  • Certificate in Public History

School of Kinesiology, Allied Health and Human Services

  • Aquatics Specialization Certificate
  • Certificate in Global Health and Humanitarian Assistance
  • Environmental Health Certificate
  • Nonprofit Management Certificate
  • Outdoor Recreation Certificate
  • School-Age Care Leadership Certificate
  • Tourism Certificate

Department of Languages and Literatures

  • Certificate in French Language Studies
  • Certificate in German Language Studies
  • Certificate in Hispanic Cultures
  • Certificate in International Commerce
  • Certificate in Post-Colonial and Multicultural Literary Studies
  • Certificate in Spanish Language Studies
  • Certificate in Spanish For Special Purposes
  • Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Certificate in Translation: Spanish

Department of Marketing

  • Certificate in Entrepreneurship
  • Certificate in Financial and Real Estate Sales for Business Majors

Department of Mathematics

  • Statistical Computing

School of Music

  • Artist Diploma (I)
  • Artist Diploma (II)

Department of Physics

  • Certificate in Physics Teaching

Department of Political Science

  • Certificate in International Peace and Security
  • Certificate in Public Administration (graduate certificate)
  • Certificate in State and Local Government

Department of Psychology

  • Certificate in Military Psychology
  • Industrial and Organizational Psychology Certificate

Department of Social Work

  • Child Welfare Certificate
  • Conflict Resolution Certificate
  • Social Work Certificate
  • Substance Abuse Counseling Certificate

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

  • Certificate in Crime Mapping and Analysis (joint coordination with Department of Geography)
  • Certificate in Sociology of Inequality
  • Certificate in Sociology of Family and Life Course
  • Certificate in Sociology of Gender and Culture
  • Certificate in Sociology of Race/Ethnicity and Immigration

Department of Special Education

  • Inclusive Education Certificate
  • Special Education Instructional Coaching

Department of Technology

  • Technology Management Certificate

College of Business Administration

  • Certificate in International Business, Culture, and Language

College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences

  • Certificate in Leadership Foundations
  • Graduate Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies

Interdisciplinary

  • Sustainability Certificate

Requirements for Graduation

In addition to the completion of one of the baccalaureate degree programs, there are other specific requirements for graduation which apply to all undergraduate students seeking any bachelor's degree, other than the Bachelor of Liberal Studies. These are listed below. The acceptance and use of transfer credit are subject to limitations in accordance with existing educational policies of the University of Northern Iowa - refer to Transfer Credit Practices listed in the Admission Requirements section of this catalog. Refer to Graduate Degree Requirements for graduation requirements for a graduate degree program.

A. Residence

  1. Not more than 32 semester hours earned in Guided Independent Study (previously specified as correspondence study at UNI), extension, or television courses may be used toward graduation.
  2. At least 32 hours of credit, of which 20 hours must be earned in the junior and senior years.
  3. At least 32 hours of credit earned in the junior and senior years in courses at this university. This total may include nonresidence credit.

B. Scholarship

  1. A student seeking the bachelor's degree with licensure to teach must successfully complete student teaching and achieve a cumulative grade index in all course work attempted, at this university and elsewhere, of at least 2.50 to be recommended for graduation. The student must also achieve a cumulative grade index of 2.50 on all work attempted at the University of Northern Iowa.
  2. A student seeking the bachelor's degree (without licensure) must achieve a cumulative grade index in all work attempted, at this university and elsewhere, of at least 2.00 to be recommended for graduation; the student must also achieve a cumulative grade index of 2.00 on all work attempted at the University of Northern Iowa.

Note: A student may be held by her/his academic department to specific grade point requirements, for the major work and/or graduation, which are higher than the grade point requirements for all university students. Students are advised to refer to the requirements for their specific major.

C. Communication

Competence in reading, speaking, and writing is required of all candidates seeking degrees or university recommendations for licensure. All students who enter UNI with or after the Fall 1988 semester who are candidates for baccalaureate degrees are required to demonstrate competence in writing by passing the Liberal Arts Core writing course and meeting the writing requirements for their academic major.

D. Foreign Language Competency Requirement

Students entering UNI who graduated from high school in 1989 or thereafter are required to demonstrate a level of competence in a foreign language (classical or modern) equivalent to that achieved after the second semester at the college level. One year of foreign language in high school is considered to be equivalent to one semester of foreign language at the university.

The foreign language competency requirement can be satisfied in the following ways:

  1. satisfactory* completion of two years of high school study in one foreign language;
  2. satisfactory* completion of a combination of high school and college study in one language equivalent to the competence achieved after the second semester at the college level;
  3. satisfactory performance in an achievement examination measuring proficiency equivalent to that attained after the second semester of college study in one foreign language.
  4. satisfactory* completion of either two years of high school study or one year of college study or the combined equivalent in American Sign Language (ASL). Study in any other language and culture for the hearing impaired will not automatically satisfy this graduation requirement.
*

Satisfactory completion means a minimum grade of C- in the last course taken to meet this requirement.

E. Advanced Courses

At least 10 hours of work in a major in courses numbered 3000/4000-level (100-199*) and taken at this university.

*

See course descriptions for 4-digit numbers (implemented Fall 2011) associated with 100-level courses.

F. Maximum Credit by Examination

A maximum of 32 semester hours of credit earned by examination or by open credit is applicable toward degree requirements. This includes credit earned by CLEP, by departmental examination, by Advanced Placement, and credit established by examination of other colleges and universities.

G. Listing of Candidates for Graduation

A student may be listed as a candidate for graduation at the end of a semester if the completion of work for which s(he) is registered would meet all the requirements for graduation exclusive of grade points, and if the grade points to be earned do not exceed the number which could be earned for the hours for which the student is registered.

H. Application for Graduation

A student who expects to be graduated at the end of a semester must complete a graduation application at the opening of that semester. This application can be accessed through MyUniverse-Student Center and upon completion is filed with the Office of the Registrar.

I. Second Baccalaureate Degree (After First Baccalaureate Conferred)

A student may pursue a second baccalaureate degree after a first baccalaureate degree has been conferred. To receive a second baccalaureate degree after first baccalaureate degree has been conferred, a student must meet the requirements for the second degree (including A. Residence, B. Scholarship, E. Advanced Courses, F. Maximum Credit by Examination, G. Listing of Candidates for Graduation, and H. Application for Graduation  designated above), and earning a minimum of 32 hours of credit.

For example: Student already has 20 specified hours of coursework from the first baccalaureate degree applying to the requirements for the second baccalaureate degree. Student will need to earn an additional 12 hours to meet the minimum 32 hours of credit required for a second baccalaureate degree.

J. Two Concurrent Degrees

A student may pursue two different baccalaureate degrees concurrently. To receive two different degrees concurrently (i.e., B.A/B.S., B.A./B.Music), a student must meet all the requirements for both degrees, (including A. Residence, B. Scholarship, C. Communication, D. Foreign Language Requirement, E. Advanced Courses, F. Maximum Credit by Examination, G. Listing of Candidates for Graduation, and H. Application for Graduation designated above).

The university does not grant two of the same degrees concurrently, including the Bachelor of Arts degree-Liberal Arts and the Bachelor of Arts degree-Teaching program.

A student may have a double major, one in Teaching and one in Liberal Arts, but the Teaching major must be declared as the first major and the B.A. Teaching degree will be the degree conferred, since the teaching degree has the higher grade index requirement.

Additional Requirements for the Baccalaureate Teaching Program

  1. For the completion of any undergraduate curriculum the student must earn a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of credit in student teaching at this university, except that an undergraduate student with three (3) or more semester hours of credit in student teaching earned at the same level in another college or university may be released from four (4) hours of student teaching at this institution.
  2. Not more than twelve (12) hours of credit in student teaching may be used toward the hours required for graduation.
  3. One year in advance of the time a student plans to enroll in student teaching, s(he) will be invited to attend a Student Teaching Roundup during which s(he) will complete the necessary steps to apply to student teach and to receive a student teaching assignment. To be eligible for assignment to a student teaching placement, s(he) must have completed the following requirements:
    1. FULL admission to the teacher education program;
    2. certificate in High Risk Behaviors/Substance Abuse;
    3. a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher on work at all colleges and universities;
    4. a UNI GPA of 2.50 or higher;
    5. a 2.50 GPA in the appropriate academic department or department approval;
    6. a grade of C- (1.67) or higher in each Professional Education Sequence course, effective January 1, 2009, and a GPA of 2.50 or higher across all such courses;
    7. completed all methods courses listed as prerequisites for student teaching with a grade of C (2.00) or higher as well as other departmental requirements;
    8. Mathematics majors are required to have a major GPA of 2.50 or higher AND departmental approval; and
    9. Health Education and Physical Education majors and minors are required to have current First Aid and CPR certification prior to student teaching.

The final student teacher assignment is based upon fulfillment of all established requirements as stated above, successful completion of Level II and Level III field experiences (minimum of 80 clock hours in PK-12 school settings), acceptable professional dispositions, and availability of placement.

Teaching Licensure

Teaching licenses are issued by state departments of education and are valid only in the state of issue. A college or university recommendation is required for issuance of a license.

Students in the UNI Teacher Education program must meet requirements for an Iowa teaching license if they are to be recommended for licensure from the University of Northern Iowa. At graduation they are eligible for the Initial License, valid for a period of two years for the kind of service indicated by the endorsement on the license; e.g., elementary and early childhood teaching, secondary teaching in content areas, or teaching in a special area such as art or music. The student usually can secure appropriate licensure in other states by making proper application and fulfilling any additional requirements.

In addition to holding a license valid for a specific teaching level, the secondary teacher must also have ENDORSEMENT in each subject to be taught. Endorsements are issued by the Iowa Department of Education on the recommendation of an institution. To secure the recommendation of the University of Northern Iowa, the student must meet the requirements for a teaching major or a teaching minor (or equivalent) in the subject. Exceptions are made only with the authorization of the university department offering the major or minor.

This university may recommend for licensure those graduates of other colleges or universities who have completed their professional education sequence courses here. However, this is a discretionary matter and the university will expect such students to demonstrate excellence of scholarship and meet standards required of its own graduates. Such students must have earned at least 20 hours of residence credit and at least 12 semester hours must be in the area for which endorsement is requested.

Program completion may include evaluations/assessments prescribed by the major, the Teacher Education Program, the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners, and/or the Iowa Department of Education.

For additional information, contact:

Office of the Registrar
University of Northern Iowa
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0006

Hours of Credit Needed to Renew or Reinstate a License

Renewal and reinstatement requirements are established by the Iowa State Board of Educational Examiners and are subject to change by that body at any time. The Bureau of Practitioner Preparation and Development of the Department of Education distributes information concerning all changes in licensure requirements to city superintendents and to the teacher-education institutions. Information concerning the renewal or reinstatement requirements may be obtained from the:

Board of Educational Examiners
Grimes State Office Building
400 E. 14th St.
Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0147
(website www.boee.iowa.gov)