2022-23 Academic Catalog
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Bachelor of Arts Degree and Minor Programs

The university offers a variety of interdisciplinary curricula to meet the growing need and interest in work beyond collegiate division. The following undergraduate majors and minors are under the supervision and jurisdiction of several committees, departments, or colleges as indicated. The programs include:

Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)/Minors

General Studies Major

The General Studies major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes UNIFI/General Education requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

This is a diversified liberal arts major supervised by the Coordinator of the Individual Studies Program.

Required
a minimum of 15 semester hours of 3000/4000-level courses from each of three of the four colleges for a minimum total hours ^45
Total Hours45

A General Studies major enables students to take a wide variety of courses from many different departments. This can lead to a well-rounded liberal arts education. The major is not directed toward any particular vocation or certification. The emphasis of this major is on distribution rather than concentration. Each General Studies major student is encouraged to develop a program of study according to their own needs, interests, and career goals. The selection of courses is largely left to the student. Students may not declare a second major and be registered for the General Studies major.

*The four colleges are:

  1. College of Business;
  2. College of Education;
  3. College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences; and
  4. College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

See General Information section for a list of the departments under each college.

(See General Studies program for registered nurses.)

Gerontology Major

The Gerontology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes UNIFI/General Education requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. UNIFI/General Education courses included in major program requirements are distinguished by italics.

It is suggested students take PSYCH 1001 , SW 1041 , and SOC 1000 as their Human Condition Domestic and Global area of UNIFI/General Education, as these are prerequisites for several of the required courses in this major.

This interdisciplinary program is offered jointly by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, the College of Business, the College of Education, and the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences. It is administered through the School of Applied Human Sciences and under the supervision of the Gerontology Advisory Committee.

Social Sciences Track

Required - all of the following:
FAM SERV 1020Family Relationships3
FAM SERV 3150/5150Families and Aging3
FAM SERV/GERO 3161Families, Alzheimer's and Related Dementias3
GERO 4195Internship in Gerontology3
PH 2630Aging and Health3
PSYCH 1001Introduction to Psychology3
PSYCH 3204/5204Psychology of Aging3
SOC 1000Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 3035/5035Social Gerontology3
End of Life Issues - choose one course from the following:3
Families and End of Life Issues
Perspectives on Death and Dying
Research Methods Course - choose one course from the following:3-4
Research Methods in Family Science
Research Methods
Research Methods
Research and Evaluation in Recreation, Tourism and Nonprofit Leadership
Development Course - choose one course from the following:3
Human Growth and Development
Developmental Psychology
Gerontology Electives - choose two courses from the following:6
Health Communication
Understanding Communication Disorders
Issues in Family Policy
Consumer Behavior Across the Lifespan
Research in Gerontology
Long Term Care Administration
Topics in Gerontology
Independent Study in Gerontology
Interior Design Standards
Public Health Theory
Bio-Medical Ethics
Social Services for Older Adults
Total Hours42-43

Long Term Care Administration Track

Required - all of the following:
ACCT 2120Principles of Financial Accounting3
FAM SERV 3161/5161Families, Alzheimer's and Related Dementias3
or GERO 3161/5161 Families, Alzheimer's and Related Dementias
GERO 4170/5170Long Term Care Administration3
GERO 4195Internship in Gerontology (9 credit hours)9
PH 2160Medical Terminology, Short Course2
PSYCH 1001Introduction to Psychology3
PSYCH 3204/5204Psychology of Aging3
SOC 1000Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 3035/5035Social Gerontology3
Business Electives - choose three courses from the following:9
Principles of Managerial Accounting
Legal and Social Environment of Business
Business Law
Organizational Management
Employment and Labor Law
Staffing and Employee Development
Gerontology Electives - choose one course from the following:3
Families and Aging
Families and End of Life Issues
Research in Gerontology
Problems in Gerontology
Independent Study in Gerontology
Aging and Health
Public Health Theory
Social Services for Older Adults
Total Hours44

Note: NHA Iowa requirements - 12 hours health care administration, 6 hours gerontology, 10 hours business plus internship.

Gerontology Minor

Required (15 hrs):
FAM SERV 1055Human Growth and Development3
or PSYCH 2202 Developmental Psychology
PSYCH 1001Introduction to Psychology3
PSYCH 3204/5204Psychology of Aging3
SOC 1000Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 3035/5035Social Gerontology3
Electives in Gerontology--must take 26
Families and Aging
Consumer Behavior Across the Lifespan
Understanding Communication Disorders
Families and End of Life Issues
Families and End of Life Issues
Long Term Care Administration
Families, Alzheimer's and Related Dementias
Social Services for Older Adults
Aging and Health
Public Health Theory
Total Hours21

Individual Studies Major

The Individual Studies major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes UNIFI/General Education requirements and the following specified major requirements (under the discretion of the Individual Studies Program Coordinator), plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Required
A coherent, interdisciplinary area of study (minimum of 40 hours)40
Undergraduate thesis6
Total Hours46

(Plus 29 hours of university electives or other major or minor credit.)

If it is found the university does not offer the major desired, it may be possible, through the Individual Studies Program, for a student to create her/his own program of study. The purpose of the Individual Studies major is twofold:

  1. to enable a student to design an individualized major by selecting courses from several academic departments, and
  2. to explore interdisciplinary areas of study before those areas are formally adopted as departmental or interdepartmental majors.

Students interested in this major should have at least one semester's experience in university study before applying. A student shall consult first with the Individual Studies Coordinator concerning the feasibility of designing an Individual Studies major in a particular area. If the university does not have faculty or curricular resources for the area requested, the student will be so advised. Also, if the student does not appear to be academically prepared, or if their plans are not sufficiently clear, specific steps to correct these problems will be recommended.

Once an advisor is appointed, the student and the advisor will develop a list of courses to comprise the proposed major, and an interdisciplinary faculty committee will be selected to take action on the specific program. In some cases, with the approval of the faculty advisor and the program coordinator, an extraordinary amount of independent study may be counted toward the major. In most cases, an undergraduate thesis will be required of this major.

The Individual Studies major is not intended to provide a secondary alternative to existing majors.

Liberal Studies Degree, Bachelor of

The Bachelor of Liberal Studies (B.L.S.) program is offered by the three Iowa Regents’ Universities: University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University, and the University of Iowa. The purpose of the B.L.S. is to offer educational opportunities to those students who are unable to attend college as full-time, on-campus students. Students often use guided independent study and other distance learning opportunities to earn credit. This major may not be declared with any other major.

See Undergraduate Degree Requirements section for further details regarding this degree.

Interactive Digital Studies Major

The Interactive Digital Studies (IDS) major is interdisciplinary in nature and is under the jurisdiction of the Department of Communication and Media. The Interactive Digital Studies major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes UNIFI/General Education requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Students who are taking Interactive Digital Studies as a second major must take course emphasis areas that do not significantly overlap with the coursework of the first degree program. According to university requirements, students in a second major program must earn "not less than 32 hours of credit beyond the hours required for the degree the student chooses to declare as the first degree."  Similarly, for students taking Interactive Digital Studies as a minor, we recommend that the course emphasis area for the minor does not significantly overlap with the coursework of the major degree program.

Required
Communication and Media:
COMM 2555Interactive Digital Communication I3
COMM 4544/5544Digital Culture and Communication3
COMM COR 1010Mass Communication and Society3
University, Interdisciplinary:
COMM 3555Interactive Digital Communication II3
UNIV 4555Interactive Digital Studies Practicum3
Electives - select two bundles (emphases) from the following:30-32
Total Hours45-47
EMPHASES
1. Digital Visualization (15 hours)
Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
COMM 4558/5558Advanced Digital Visualization: (Topic)3
COMM DM 1611Media and Power3
or COMM 4213/5213 Visual Rhetoric
COMM DM 3659Editing and Design3
COMM DM 4655Photojournalism3
Total Hours15
2. Digital Computation (17 hours)
Computer Science:
CS 1510Introduction to Computing4
CS 1520Data Structures4
CS 2530Intermediate Computing *3
CS 3110Web Application Development3
CS 3120/5120User Interface Design3
Total Hours17
3. Digital Writing (15 hours)
English:
ENGLISH 2770Introduction to Workplace Writing3
ENGLISH 4785/5785Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers3
or ENGLISH 4770/5770 Applied Writing: Proposals and Grants
ENGLISH 4025/5025Theory and Practice of Writing3
or ENGLISH 4040/5040 Digital Writing: Theory and Practice
Select 2 from the following courses (6 units total)6
Electronic Literature *
Issues in Digital Humanities
Applied Writing: Workplace Communication
Applied Writing: Specialized Documents
Total Hours15
4. Digital Music (15 hours)
Music Theory (required):
MUS THEO 1300Topics in Music Composition (Electronic composition section)2
MUS THEO 3220/5220Music and Technology4
MUS THEO 3230/5230Music Technology, Advanced4
Music Theory (select two of the following):4
Introduction to Music Theory
Theory I
Theory II
Theory class placement is determined by a diagnostic examination.
Music elective1
Total hours15
Additionally, it is recommended that students taking this bundle elect to take MUSIC 1100 as part of their UNIFI/General Education courses.
5. Digital Imaging (15 hours)
Graphic Technologies:
TECH 1055Graphic Communications Foundations3
TECH 2070Digital Pre-Media3
TECH 3169Digital Imaging3
TECH 4158/5158Graphic Communication Data Visualization3
TECH 4161Digital Graphic Communications3
Total Hours15
6. Digital Advertising (15 hours)
Economics:
ECON 1031Introduction to Business Economics3
or ECON 1041 Principles of Macroeconomics
Marketing:
MKTG 2110Principles of Marketing3
MKTG 3143Advertising and Promotion3
MKTG 3146Digital Advertising3
MKTG 3148Digital Customer Experience *3
or ENTR 3583/5583 Entrepreneurship
or MKTG 4150 Advertising Campaign Development
Total Hours15
7. Digital History (15 hours)
Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
COMM 4412/5412Performing History3
History:
HIST 1010Introduction to Historical Skills3
HIST 4010/5010Introduction to Public History3
HIST 4020/5020Introduction to Museum Studies3
Total Hours15

8. Web Development (15 hours)

Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
Computer Science:
CS 1100Web Development: Client-Side Coding3
CS 2100Web Development: Server-side Coding3
CS 3120/5120User Interface Design3
Marketing:
MKTG 3148Digital Customer Experience *3
Total Hours15

9. Digital Video (15 hours) 

Communication and Media:
COMM DM 1651Digital Media Production I3
COMM DM 1652Writing for Digital Media3
COMM DM 2651Digital Media Production II3
COMM DM 3658Digital Journalism: (Topic)3
COMM DM 4630/5630Digital Media Law and Ethics3
or COMM DM 4644/5644 Global Media
Total Hours15
 

Interactive Digital Studies Minor

The Interactive Digital Studies minor is interdisciplinary in nature and is under the jurisdiction of the Department of Communication and Media. This minor requires a 12-hour core plus 15-17 hours from one of the nine emphases.

Required
Communication and Media:
COMM 2555Interactive Digital Communication I3
COMM 4544/5544Digital Culture and Communication3
COMM COR 1010Mass Communication and Society3
COMM 3555Interactive Digital Communication II3
Electives - select one bundle (emphasis) from the following:15-17
Total Hours27-29
1. Digital Visualization (15 hours)
Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
COMM 4558/5558Advanced Digital Visualization: (Topic)3
COMM DM 1611Media and Power3
or COMM 4213/5213 Visual Rhetoric
COMM DM 3659Editing and Design3
COMM DM 4655Photojournalism3
Total Hours15
2. Digital Computation (17 hours)
Computer Science:
CS 1510Introduction to Computing4
CS 1520Data Structures4
CS 2530Intermediate Computing *3
CS 3110Web Application Development3
CS 3120/5120User Interface Design3
Total Hours17

3. Digital Writing (15 hours)

English:
ENGLISH 2770Introduction to Workplace Writing3
ENGLISH 4025/5025Theory and Practice of Writing3
or ENGLISH 4040/5040 Digital Writing: Theory and Practice
ENGLISH 4785/5785Applied Writing: Projects, Grants and Careers3
or ENGLISH 4770/5770 Applied Writing: Proposals and Grants
Select 2 from the following courses (6 units total)6
Electronic Literature *
Applied Writing: Workplace Communication
Applied Writing: Specialized Documents
Issues in Digital Humanities
Total Hours15
4. Digital Music (15 hours)
Music Theory (required):
MUS THEO 1300Topics in Music Composition (Electronic Composition section)2
MUS THEO 3220/5220Music and Technology4
MUS THEO 3230/5230Music Technology, Advanced4
Music Theory (select two of the following):4
Introduction to Music Theory
Theory I
Theory II
Theory class placement is determined by a diagnostic examination.
Music elective1
Additionally, it is recommended that students taking this bundle elect to take MUSIC 1100 as part of their UNIFI/General Education courses.
Total Hours15
5. Digital Imaging (15 hours)
Graphic Technologies:
TECH 1055Graphic Communications Foundations3
TECH 2070Digital Pre-Media3
TECH 3169Digital Imaging3
TECH 4158/5158Graphic Communication Data Visualization3
TECH 4161Digital Graphic Communications3
Total Hours15
6. Digital Advertising (15 hours)
Economics:
ECON 1031Introduction to Business Economics3
or ECON 1041 Principles of Macroeconomics
Marketing:
MKTG 2110Principles of Marketing3
MKTG 3143Advertising and Promotion3
MKTG 3146Digital Advertising3
MKTG 3148Digital Customer Experience *3
or ENTR 3583/5583 Entrepreneurship
or MKTG 4150 Advertising Campaign Development
Total Hours15
7. Digital History (15 hours)
Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
COMM 4412/5412Performing History3
History:
HIST 1010Introduction to Historical Skills3
HIST 4010/5010Introduction to Public History3
HIST 4020/5020Introduction to Museum Studies3
Total Hours15

8. Web Development (15 hours)

Communication and Media:
COMM 3558Introduction to Digital Visualization3
Computer Science:
CS 1100Web Development: Client-Side Coding3
CS 2100Web Development: Server-side Coding3
CS 3120/5120User Interface Design3
Marketing:
MKTG 3148Digital Customer Experience *3
Total Hours15

 9. Digital Video (15 hours)

Communication and Media:
COMM DM 1651Digital Media Production I3
COMM DM 1652Writing for Digital Media3
COMM DM 2651Digital Media Production II3
COMM DM 3658Digital Journalism: (Topic)3
COMM DM 4630/5630Digital Media Law and Ethics3
or COMM DM 4644/5644 Global Media
Total Hours15

International Business Minor

The interdepartmental minor in International Business is available to College of Business students majoring in Accounting, Business Teaching, Economics - Business Economics emphasis, Finance, Management, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Real Estate, and Supply Chain Management. The International Business minor enhances the common body of knowledge gained through the business core by focusing on international trade and commerce issues/perspectives.

Required
World Affairs:3
Select one of the following:
Geography:
Global Geography
Political Science:
International Relations
International Business core:12
Marketing:
Distribution and Logistics
Global Marketing
Management:
International Management
Financial:
International Financial Management
International Financial Economics
Economics:
International Economics
Economic Development
International Experience:0
International Experience **
International Electives
Select one of the following:2-3
Business, Interdepartmental:
Socio-Economic Reality of Central America *
Management:
Supply Chain and Purchasing
Political Science:
Politics of the Global Economy
International Law
International Organizations
Sociology/Anthropology:
Language and Culture
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
International Internship
Or any additional course listed within the international business core above.
Total Hours17-18

International Business Minor (Non-Business Majors)

The interdepartmental minor in International Business (Non-Business Majors) is available to any non-business major. The purpose of this minor is to allow non-business majors to build a basic body of knowledge concerning business and business operations and expand this knowledge with respect to international business, trade, and commerce. 

Required
World Affairs3
Select one of the following:
Geography:
Global Geography
Political Science:
International Relations
Business Core15
Accounting:
Principles of Financial Accounting
Marketing:
Principles of Marketing
Management:
Legal and Social Environment of Business
Organizational Management
Economics:
Introduction to Business Economics
International Business core8-9
Management:
International Management
International electives:
Select two from the following:
Business, Interdepartmental:
Socio-Economic Reality of Central America *
Marketing:
Distribution and Logistics
Global Marketing
International Internship
International Experience0
International Experience **
Total Hours26-27

NOT available to majors in: Accounting, Business Teaching, Economics-Business Economics Emphasis, Finance, Management, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Real Estate, and Supply Chain Management.

NOT available to General Business Concepts minors. 

Russian and East European Studies Minor

This minor is offered by the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences and the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Required
Language *12-20
History:3
Select one of the following:
Modern Central and Eastern Europe
History of Imperial Russia
History of Soviet Russia
Select two of the following:6
Humanities/Languages (required):
Russia/Soviet Union
Political Science:
Nationalism
Russian Politics
An additional literature or language class, with the approval of a REES advisor. A Russian/East European topics course or seminar, with the approval of a REES advisor **,***
Total hours ***18-29

Study Abroad: Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad for at least one summer, preferably one semester. Study abroad may be used to satisfy program requirements for language or non-language course work, with the approval of a REES (Russian and East European Studies) advisor.

Studies in Sexuality, Women and Gender Minor

Studies in Sexuality, Women and Gender Minor is an interdisciplinary and multicultural program that engages in research and exploration concerning all areas of human experience. Its unique perspective strengthens the abilities of students within any major to critically analyze theory and research emphasizing the importance of gender while including other essential categories of analysis such as race, class, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality. This program is offered under the jurisdiction and general supervision of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. For more information, contact the Women's and Gender Studies office, Sabin 225, 319-273-7102, or csbs.uni.edu/womenstudies

Required6
Humanities:
Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction
Choose one of the following:
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
Human Relationships and Sexuality
Good Sex: The Ethics of Human Sexuality
Electives:12
Anthropology:
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective *
Communication and Media:
Gender Issues in Communication
Voices from the Margin: Performance, Rhetoric, and Social Change
Criminology:
Women, Crime and Society *
Educational Psychology:
Social Psychology in Educational Contexts
Languages and Literature:
Literature: (topic) (Topics in Women's and Gender Studies ONLY)
Literature, Gender and Intersectionality *
The American Renaissance *
American Realism and Naturalism to WWI *
Family Services:
Human Relationships and Sexuality
Violence in Intimate Relationships
Public Health and Education:
Introduction to Women's Health
Selected Topics in Women's Health
History:
United States Women's History
Modern European Women's History
Humanities:
Black Women in America: Challenge, Spirit, Survival
Philosophy:
Money, Sex and Power: Theories of Race, Class and Gender
Psychology:
Psychology of Gender *
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective *
World Religions:
Religions of the World (Family Life emphasis only) **
Women and Christianity
Social Sciences:
Women, Men, and Society
Sociology:
Social Movements *
Social Inequality *
Men and Masculinities
Sociology of Gender
Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences *
Women's and Gender Studies:
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
Internship in Women's and Gender Studies *
Total Hours18

Notes:

No more than 9 hours from courses with the same prefix.

A minimum of 9 hours from the 3000-level or above.

No more than one of the following may be counted for WGS credit: COMM 4446/5446 or SOC 2040

Bachelor of Liberal Studies, B.L.S.

Four essential student learning outcomes have been identified for the Bachelor of Liberal Studies and General Studies majors. They are:

1) effective written communication;

2) critical thinking;

3) information literacy and

4) integrative learning.

These student outcomes are expressly meant to prepare GS and BLS students for success in a rapidly changing, globally competitive and culturally diverse world and to lead productive and responsible lives. The details of each outcome are defined as follows:

● Learning Outcome #1: Effective written communication – written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. For written communication to be effective, one must possess the ability to use written language in a precise and user- friendly way in order to clearly express oneself to the intended audience. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Composing and presenting effective written messages with a variety of audiences using appropriate academic discourse and technologies.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Written Communication VALUE Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate written communication.

● Learning Outcome #2: Critical thinking – critical thinking is the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion. To exercise critical thinking, one must possess the ability to engage in reflective and independent thinking and understand the logical connection between ideas. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Clearly identifying an issue or problem and carefully analyzing it using relevant sources of information in order to formulate logical conclusions.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Critical Thinking VALUE Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate critical thinking.

● Learning Outcome #3: Information literacy – information literacy is the ability to know when information is needed. To be an information literate person, one must be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively use sources of information for an issue or problem at hand. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Determining the extent of information needed, accessing information using welldesigned strategies and evaluating it critically through ethical and legal means.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the Information Literacy Rubric (adopted from the AAC&U Information Literacy VALUE Rubric, the ACRL Information Literacy Framework and the PALNI consortium information literacy learning objectives) for artifacts submitted to demonstrate information literacy.

● Learning Outcome #4: Integrative Learning – integrative learning is the ability to make connections across disciplines. To effectively use integrative learning, one must be able to make connections among ideas and experiences and transfer learning to new situations. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Connecting relevant experience and academic knowledge across disciplines and applying them to new situations.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Integrative Learning Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate integrative learning.

General Studies, B.A.

Four essential student learning outcomes have been identified for the Bachelor of Liberal Studies and General Studies majors.

They are:

1) effective written communication;

2) critical thinking;

3) information literacy and

4) integrative learning.

These student outcomes are expressly meant to prepare GS and BLS students for success in a rapidly changing, globally competitive and culturally diverse world and to lead productive and responsible lives. The details of each outcome are defined as follows:

● Learning Outcome #1: Effective written communication – written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. For written communication to be effective, one must possess the ability to use written language in a precise and user- friendly way in order to clearly express oneself to the intended audience. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Composing and presenting effective written messages with a variety of audiences using appropriate academic discourse and technologies.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Written Communication VALUE Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate written communication.

● Learning Outcome #2: Critical thinking – critical thinking is the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion. To exercise critical thinking, one must possess the ability to engage in reflective and independent thinking and understand the logical connection between ideas. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Clearly identifying an issue or problem and carefully analyzing it using relevant sources of information in order to formulate logical conclusions.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Critical Thinking VALUE Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate critical thinking.

● Learning Outcome #3: Information literacy – information literacy is the ability to know when information is needed. To be an information literate person, one must be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively use sources of information for an issue or problem at hand. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Determining the extent of information needed, accessing information using welldesigned strategies and evaluating it critically through ethical and legal means.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the Information Literacy Rubric (adopted from the AAC&U Information Literacy VALUE Rubric, the ACRL Information Literacy Framework and the PALNI consortium information literacy learning objectives) for artifacts submitted to demonstrate information literacy.

● Learning Outcome #4: Integrative Learning – integrative learning is the ability to make connections across disciplines. To effectively use integrative learning, one must be able to make connections among ideas and experiences and transfer learning to new situations. Students will achieve this goal by:

- Connecting relevant experience and academic knowledge across disciplines and applying them to new situations.

- Scoring a 4, 3, or 2 for all components within the AAC&U Integrative Learning Rubric for artifacts submitted to demonstrate integrative learning.

Individual Studies, B.A.

This program operates differently with regard to learning outcomes (since it provides a mechanism to create a major), Establishing learning outcomes for the Individual Studies program is in progress.