2021-22 Academic Catalog
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Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

(College of Social and Behavioral Sciences)

www.uni.edu/sac

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology offers the following undergraduate and graduate programs and program certificates.  Specific requirements for these programs are listed within this Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology section in the following order:

Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)

Undergraduate Major (B.A.S.)

Minors

Program Certificates

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

Anthropology Major

The Anthropology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Required
ANTH 1001 (990:010)Human Origins3
ANTH 1002 (990:011)Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 3001 (990:177)Language and Culture3
ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g)Anthropological Theory3
Required Electives in Major
1. Statistics (select one from the following):3
Statistics for Social Research
Introduction to Statistical Methods
2. Cultural Anthropology (select one from the following):3
Psychological Anthropology
Culture, Disease, and Healing
Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
3. Physical Anthropology (select one from the following):3
Bioarchaeology
Physical Anthropology: History and Theory
Human Biological Variation
4. Pre-History (select one from the following):3
Archaeology of the New World
Archaeology of the Old World
5. Methods and Research (select one from the following):3
Forensic Anthropology
Interpreting the Archaeological Record
Introduction to Museum Studies
Archaeological Fieldwork
Qualitative Research
Anthropology Internship
Electives in Anthropology6
Electives in Sociology3
Total Hours36

Criminology and Criminal Justice Major

The Criminology and Criminal Justice major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours. 

In order to graduate with a major in Criminology, students must take at least 15 credit hours of CRIM Prefix Upper Division (3000/4000-level) courses at UNI.

Required
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research **3
or PSYCH 3003 (400:102) Psychological Statistics
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
CRIM 4575 (982:175)Senior Seminar in Criminology (Diversity Course Requirement)3
Diversity Course Requirement
To meet this requirement, students must complete one of the following courses: CRIM 2152 (982:152), CRIM 3100, CRIM 3151 (982:151), CRIM 3228, CRIM 3369, CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g). Note that the class taken for the diversity requirement will also count as an elective in its respective group.
Criminology Electives9
Juvenile Delinquency
Crime and Community (Diversity course)
Social Deviance and Control (Diversity course)
Crime and Social Inequality (Diversity course)
Victimology
Drugs and Society (Diversity course)
Youth Gangs
Homicide
Women, Crime and Society
Topics in Criminology (as designated)
Criminology Independent Study
Criminal Justice Electives9
Criminal Law and Procedure
Report Writing in Criminal Justice
Criminal Investigation
Criminalistics
Crime Analysis
Community Corrections
Juvenile Justice
Cooperative Education
Communication Ethics for Criminal Justice Professionals
Criminal Court System
Crime and Punishment
Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System (Diversity course)
Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice
Advanced Criminal Procedure
Police and Society
Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice
Crime and Public Policy
Wrongful Convictions
Corrections Special Topics
Law Enforcement Special Topics
Topics in Criminal Justice
Criminology Internship
Criminal Justice Independent Study
Practical Field Experience
Interdisciplinary Electives3
Forensic Anthropology
Immigration and Transnationalism
Conflict Resolution
Drugs and Individual Behavior
Abnormal Psychology
Law, Politics, and Society
Civil Rights and Liberties
Problems in Juvenile and Family Law
Terrorism and Insurgency
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Childhood Inequalities
Violence in Intimate Relationships
Conflict Resolution
Total Hours39

Note: Students majoring in criminology should take CRIM 2022 (982:022) and CRIM 2025 (982:025) before taking any 3000/4000-level courses within the major.

Graduation note: In order to graduate with a major in criminology, students must achieve a total major GPA of at least 2.33.

Criminology and Criminal Justice Major: Law Enforcement Emphasis

Required
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research **3
or PSYCH 3003 (400:102) Psychological Statistics
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
CRIM 4575 (982:175)Senior Seminar in Criminology3
Diveristy Course Requirement
To meet this requirement, students must complete one of the following courses: CRIM 2152 (982:152), CRIM 3100, CRIM 3151 (982:151), CRIM 3228, CRIM 3369, CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g). Note that the class taken for the diversity requirement will also count as an elective in its respective group.
Criminology Electives9
Juvenile Delinquency
Crime and Community (Diversity course)
Social Deviance and Control (Diversity course)
Crime and Social Inequality (Diversity course)
Victimology
Drugs and Society (Diversity course)
Youth Gangs
Homicide
Women, Crime and Society (Diversity course)
Topics in Criminology
Criminology Independent Study
Criminal Justice Electives9
Crime Analysis
Community Corrections
Juvenile Justice
Cooperative Education
Criminal Court System
Crime and Punishment
Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System
Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice
Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice
Crime and Public Policy
Corrections Special Topics
Topics in Criminal Justice
Criminology Internship
Criminal Justice Independent Study
Practical Field Experience
Interdisciplinary Electives3
Forensic Anthropology
Immigration and Transnationalism
Conflict Resolution
Law, Politics, and Society
Civil Rights and Liberties
Problems in Juvenile and Family Law
Terrorism and Insurgency
Drugs and Individual Behavior
Abnormal Psychology
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Childhood Inequalities
Violence in Intimate Relationships
Conflict Resolution
Law Enforcement Electives9
At least one 3-credit course must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Criminal Law and Procedure
Report Writing in Criminal Justice
Criminal Investigation
Criminalistics
Communication Ethics for Criminal Justice Professionals
Police and Society
Advanced Criminal Procedure
Wrongful Convictions
Law Enforcement Special Topics
Total Hours48

Criminology and Criminal Justice Major: Corrections Emphasis

Required
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research **3
or PSYCH 3003 (400:102) Psychological Statistics
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
CRIM 4575 (982:175)Senior Seminar in Criminology (Diversity Course Requirement)3
Diversity Course Requirement
To meet this requirement, students must complete one of the following courses: CRIM 2152 (982:152), CRIM 3100, CRIM 3151 (982:151), CRIM 3228, CRIM 3369, CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g). Note that the class taken for the diversity requirement will also count as an elective in its respective group.
Criminology9
Juvenile Delinquency
Crime and Community (Diversity course)
Social Deviance and Control (Diversity course)
Crime and Social Inequality (Diversity course)
Victimology
Drugs and Society (Diversity course)
Youth Gangs
Homicide
Women, Crime and Society (Diversity course)
Topics in Criminology (as designated)
Criminology Independent Study
Criminal Justice9
Criminal Law and Procedure
Criminal Investigation
Criminalistics
Crime Analysis
Juvenile Justice
Cooperative Education
Criminal Court System
Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System (Diversity course)
Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice
Police and Society
Advanced Criminal Procedure
Crime and Public Policy
Wrongful Convictions
Topics in Criminal Justice
Criminology Internship
Criminal Justice Independent Study
Practical Field Experience
Interdisciplinary Elective3
Forensic Anthropology
Immigration and Transnationalism
Conflict Resolution
Drugs and Individual Behavior
Abnormal Psychology
Law, Politics, and Society
Civil Rights and Liberties
Problems in Juvenile and Family Law
Terrorism and Insurgency
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Childhood Inequalities
Violence in Intimate Relationships
Conflict Resolution
Corrections Electives9
Report Writing in Criminal Justice
Community Corrections
Communication Ethics for Criminal Justice Professionals
Crime and Punishment
Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice
Corrections Special Topics
Total Hours48

Sociology Major

The Sociology major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

I. Required courses:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2000The Sociological Career3
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g)Sociological Theory3
Select one of the following:3
Statistics for Social Research
Psychological Statistics
II. Electives (no more than 6 hours may be 1000- or 2000-level)15
Sociology of Families
Social Movements
Social Psychology
Social Gerontology
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Social Inequality
Men and Masculinities
Sociology of Culture
Immigration and Transnationalism
Medical Sociology
Sociology of Gender
Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences
Seminar in Sociology
Crime and Social Inequality
III. Professional Development elective:3
Qualitative Research
Quantitative Research
Program and Policy Evaluation
Cooperative Education
Independent Study
Sociology Internship
Theory and Practice in Applied Settings
Research Experience in Sociology
Readings in Sociology
Total Hours33

 

Bachelor of Applied Science Degree Program

The purpose of the Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree is to offer educational opportunities to those students who have completed an A.A.S degree and are now seeking to complete a four-year degree.  These students are often place-bound and need to take online classes while remaining a full-time employee.

Admission to the Program

Each student entering the program must have earned:

1.      an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree from an accredited institution; and

2.      a minimum 2.00 grade point average; and

3.      two years of relevant work experience.

Total Credit Requirements

A total of at least 120 semester hours of credit, including applicable transferable credit earned, is required for graduation. The total must fulfill the following specifications:

1.      23-24 hours of Liberal Arts Core classes, as outlined below (of which 9 hours can be transferred in as LAC 1A, 1B, and 1C);

2.      6 hours of Professional Communication, as outlined below;

3.      21-30 hours of Major coursework, from one of the majors listed below;

4.      0-19 hours of elective credit, for a total of 60 semester hours of credit taken at the University of Northern Iowa.

Liberal Arts Core Requirements for B.A.S. Degree*:

Students must meet the following undergraduate Liberal Arts Core requirements as specified below.

Summary:
1. Category 1: Core Competencies in Categories 1A (writing), 1B (speaking), and 1C (math) or transfer equivalencies* 9
*BAS students are permitted to transfer in courses equivalent to Categories 1A, 1B, & 1C. No other classes can be applied to fulfill the LAC portion of the BAS degree.
2. Category 2: Civilizations & Cultures (1 course from Category 2A or 2B)3
3. Category 3: Fine Arts, Literature, Philosophy & Religion (1 course from Category 3A or 3B)3
4. Category 4: Natural Science & Technology (1 course from Category 4A or 4B)3
5. Category 5: Social Science (1 course from Category 5A, 5B, or 5C)3
6. Category 6: Capstone Experience (1 course)(2-3hours or 1 additional course from BAS LAC Category 2, 3, 4, or 5)2-3
Total Hours23-24

Professional Communication Required Courses for B.A.S. Degree

Required:
COMM 3155 (48C:173)Business and Professional Oral Communication3
ENGLISH 3770Technical Writing in Applied Sciences3
Total Hours6

Criminal Justice Major

Courses required to have taken before enrolling in B.A.S. program, or take simultaneously with other courses in the B.A.S. program.
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
or culture/diversity related class approved by BAS Criminal Justice major advisor.
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
Required:
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
CRIM 4575 (982:175)Senior Seminar in Criminology3
Electives:18
6 hours of any 1000, 2000, 3000, or 4000-level CRIM prefix classes
12 hours of any upper division (3000/4000-level) CRIM prefix classes
Total Hours33

Tactical Emergency Services with Vulnerable Populations Major

The Bachelor of Applied Sciences degree in Tactical Emergency Services with Vulnerable Populations is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences, and College of Education. This program is administered through the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences under the jurisdiction and general supervision of the College Dean, with a designated program director.

The Bachelor of Applied Sciences degree in Tactical Emergency Services with Vulnerable Populations is designed for practitioners of tactical emergency services who are interested in earning a Bachelor of Applied Sciences with specialization in diverse and vulnerable populations in their technical fields. Admission to the major is limited to students with an AAS degree in one or more of the following tactical operator fields: Fire Sciences, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, Homeland Security, Military Sciences, and related degrees. Two or more years of professional experience in one of these fields is preferred but NOT required.

This major requires 30 credit hours, which includes 19 hours of required core courses; 8 hours of major electives; and 3 credit  hours of a final field practicum with a culminating project serving vulnerable populations. As the B.A.S. degree requires the completion of 60 credit hours, students can use the remaining hours to complete any outstanding LAC requirements that did not transfer, and any other university or major electives.

All UNI courses will be provided via distance education and/or online, in order to target place-bound working adults around the state and nation. Students can be full-time or part-time. Part-time students will take at least 2 courses per semester online. The CSBS advisor for this interdisciplinary degree will assist students in proceeding through the degree successfully online through distance learning.

In order to graduate, students must have completed 60 credit hours, as well as a field-based practicum and culminating project and paper with vulnerable populations as part of their required courses, and an exit GPA of at least 2.0. Additional exit requirements also include successful completion of the following certificate trainings which are offered through multiple national organizations such as the Red Cross, American Heart Association, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency:

First Aid

Blood-borne Pathogens

Hazardous Materials

CPR (Basic)

FEMA Incident Command System Trainings: 100, 200, 300, 400, 700 and 800 

Required Major Courses:
Communication and Media:
COMM 3000/5000 (48C:166g)Selected Topics in Communication3
COMM 4344/5344 (48C:151g)Intercultural Communication3
Earth Sciences:
EARTHSCI 1200 (870:021)Elements of Weather3
Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services4
Cultural Competency for the Helping Professions
Minority Health
International Health
Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology:
ANTH 4010/5010Climate Change, Human Migration and Conflict3
Psychology:3
Psychology of Gender *
Social Psychology *
Major Electives:8
Immigration and Transnationalism **
Seminar in Sociology
Environmental Health Science
Environmental and Occupational Health Regulations
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Psychology and Law
Health Psychology
SW 4186 Studies in: Social Work with Persons with Disabilities
Organizational Psychology
Culture and Marriage
Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction
Introduction to Public Health
Area Studies courses can also be counted towards electives.
Additional courses may be substituted in as major electives, upon approval of the program director.
Required Field Practicum and Culminating Project for the Major3
(Select one of the following courses, taken during the last semester)
Global Service Mission
Internship
Criminology Internship
Total Hours30

Minors

Anthropology Minor

Required
Anthropology:
ANTH 1001 (990:010)Human Origins3
ANTH 1002 (990:011)Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g)Anthropological Theory3
Electives in anthropology9
Total Hours18

Criminology Minor

Required:
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
Criminology:
CRIM 2022 (982:022)Criminal Justice System3
CRIM 2025 (982:025)Criminology3
Electives:
Nine hours of courses with CRIM prefix (3 hours must be at 3000/4000 level)9
Total Hours18

Social Justice Minor

Required:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 4053Social Justice Seminar3
Electives in Sociology:9
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Sociology of Culture
Immigration and Transnationalism
Medical Sociology
Society and Mental Illness
Refugees and Humanitarianism
Sociology of Gender
Electives: 2 classes in one of the following Focus Areas:6
Focus Area 1: Intersectionalities of Race, Class, Gender and Sexualities
Gender Issues in Communication
Women, Crime and Society
United States Women's History
Modern European Women's History
Women in Politics
American Racial and Ethnic Minorities
Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
Focus Area 2: Social Inequality, Power and Privilege
Criminal Justice System
The American Radical Tradition
Minority Health
Community Politics
Civil Rights and Liberties
Politics of Nonviolence
Introduction to Political Theory: Freedom, Justice and Power
Diversity and Difference
Focus Area 3: Global Connections & Culture
Language and Culture
Climate Change, Human Migration and Conflict
Social Protest: Performance and Rhetoric
Performance and Social Change
Modern Climate Change: Evidence and Predictions
U.S. Environmental History
International Health
Ethics in Business
Environmental Ethics
Politics of International Development
Total Hours21

Sociology Minor

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
Electives in sociology (SOC prefix) 15
Total Hours21

Notes:

Students are advised to take Introduction to Sociology and Research Methods before taking any other sociology courses.

Not more than 9 semester hours of credit from SOC 4501/5501 , SOC 4500/5500 , SOC 4502/5502 , and SOC 4198 (980:198) may be applied toward the minor, except with the approval of your advisor and department head.

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university. For information on the following program certificates, contact the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Certificate in Sociology of Family and Life Course

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: **9
Sociology:
Sociology of Families
Social Gerontology
Sociology of Gender
Philosophy and World Religions:
Perspectives on Death and Dying
Anthropology:
Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft
Criminology:
Juvenile Delinquency ***
Total Hours15

Certificate in Sociology of Gender and Culture

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: *9
Sociology/Anthropology:
Social Psychology
Language and Culture
Men and Masculinities
Sociology of Culture
Culture, Disease, and Healing
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Sociology of Gender
Criminology:
Women, Crime and Society ***
Total Hours15

Certificate in Sociology of Health and Development

Required Courses for all Sociology Certificates:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
*Students are advised to take SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems AND SOC 2010 Research Methods before taking any of the courses listed below.
The Sociology of Health and Development:
Choose three courses*:9
Juvenile Delinquency
Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System
Social Psychology
Medical Sociology
Society and Mental Illness
Total Hours15

Certificate in Sociology of Inequality

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: **9
Sociology:
Social Movements
Social Inequality
Men and Masculinities
Immigration and Transnationalism
Immigration and Transnationalism
Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences
Criminology:
Crime and Social Inequality ***
Total Hours15

Certificate in Sociology of Inequality and Inclusion

Required Courses for all Sociology Certificates:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods3
*Students are advised to take SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems AND SOC 2010 Research Methods before taking any of the courses listed below.
The Sociology of Inequality and Inclusion:
Choose three courses*:9
Introduction to Human Rights
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Social Inequality
Men and Masculinities
Refugees and Humanitarianism
Total Hours15

Certificate in Sociology of Race/Ethnicity and Immigration

Required
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology *3
or SOC 1060 (980:060) Social Problems
SOC 2010 (980:108)Research Methods *3
Select three of the following: *9
Sociology/Anthropology:
Social Movements
Social Psychology
Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
Sociology of Culture
Immigration and Transnationalism
Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Total Hours15

Certificate in Crime Mapping and Analysis

This interdisciplinary program certificate provides students with both theoretical and applied training in spatial mapping and the analysis of crime data. This program certificate is offered jointly by the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology and Department of Geography.

Required
Criminology:
CRIM 2134Crime Analysis3
CRIM 3400Police and Society3
Geography:
GEOG 3310 (970:164)Geographic Information Systems I3
GEOG 4310/5310 (970:170g)GIS Applications: (Variable Topic)3
or GEOG 4335/5335 Web Mapping and GIS
Sociology:
SOC 1000 (980:001)Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2020 (980:080)Statistics for Social Research3
or STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods
Total Hours18

Anthropology, B.A.

GOAL I. Anthropology students will understand the nature of the anthropological perspective including the history, theory and methods of the four subfields (cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology and biological anthropology). Students will be able to:

Outcome 1.1 identify major anthropological theories and historical figures in: Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology.

Outcome 1.2 critically evaluate anthropological theories in Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology.

Outcome 1.3 critically apply anthropological theories in relation to empirical evidence.

GOAL II. Anthropology students will be able to apply the anthropological cross- cultural perspective to a critical understanding of themselves and the world in which they live. Students will be able to:

Outcome 2.1 explain how culture, biology and the environment interact in shaping human behavior and use those ideas to critique stereotypes about people and populations.

Outcome 2.2 explain how colonialism and globalization have affected and are currently affecting societies around the world.

Outcome 2.3 practice global literacy by interacting across cultural, linguistic and political boundaries.

GOAL III. Anthropology students will be able to demonstrate their ability to analyze at least two types of anthropological data used in the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. Students will be able to:

Outcome 3.1 collect the appropriate data in a research project related to at least two of the following: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data.

Outcome 3.2 organize and catalog at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data.

Outcome 3.3 analyze and interpret at least two of the following types of data: ethnographic data based upon participant observation, transcriptions of spoken discourse, archaeological data, and/or human skeletal data.

GOAL IV. Anthropology students will possess the skills of a practicing anthropologist. Students will be able to:

Outcome 4.1 apply critical thinking and creative thinking (e.g., think outside the box, identify new problems, create new solutions) to anthropological problems.

Outcome 4.2 use a variety of library resources (print and electronic) to produce written documents and oral presentations for a variety of audiences.

Outcome 4.3 explain how their undergraduate training and anthropological knowledge are relevant and of value to potential employers as well as to graduate or professional schools.

Outcome 4.4 identify key ethical issues in anthropology.

Criminology, B.A.

Outcome 1: Students Can Demonstrate Knowledge of Criminology and the Criminal Justice System, and Professional Skills (program content)

1.1 Students can explain the social causes and consequences of a crime

1.2 Students can describe the operation of the criminal justice system

1.3 Students can develop and exhibit the skill set required for entering the professional field

Outcome 2: Students Can Analyze and Interpret Information (critical thinking)

2.1 Students can translate and apply criminological research to real-world contexts

2.2 Students can build an argument based on multiple sources

Outcome 3: Students Can Effectively Communicate In Academic and Professional Settings (communication)

3.1 Students can apply criminological knowledge in a written report that is clear, cohesive, and

factually accurate

3.2 Students can apply criminological knowledge in an oral report that is clear, cohesive, and factually accurate

Sociology, B.A.

Outcome 1: Students Can Think and Write Critically using Sociological Theory (program content)

1.1 Students can apply sociological theories to explain social phenomena

1.2 Students can critically evaluate explanations of human behavior and social phenomenon

Outcome 2: Students Can Collect, Analyze and Interpret Information (critical thinking)

2.1 Students can apply scientific principles to understand the social world

2.2 Students can evaluate the quality of scientific methods and data

Outcome 3: Students Can Effectively Communicate about What Sociology Is and Why It Matters (communication)

3.1 Students can rigorously analyze social scientific data

3.2 Students can use sociological knowledge to inform public policy debates and promote public understanding

Anthropology, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
ANTH 1002 (990:011) Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
HUM 1021 (680:021) Humanities I: The Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Worlds 3
SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
ANTH 1001 (990:010) Human Origins 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
Content Area - Statistics 3
Anthropology Elective 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
Content Area - Prehistory 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
ANTH 3001 (990:177) Language and Culture * 3
Content Area - Methods and Research 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g) Anthropological Theory 3
Content Area: Cultural 3
Content Area - Physical 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Anthropology Elective 6
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Anthropology Elective 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

*COMM 4344/5344 (48C:151g), TESOL 4540/5540 (630:160g) or TESOL 4540/5540 (630:160g) can serve as substitute for ANTH 3001 (990:177) effective summer 2019.

Criminology and Criminal Justice, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
COMM 1000 (48C:001) Oral Communication 3
ENGLISH 1005 (620:005) College Writing and Research 3
HUM 1021 (680:021) Humanities I: The Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Worlds 3
SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology 3
 Hours12
Spring
CRIM 2022 (982:022) Criminal Justice System 3
STAT 1772 (800:072) Introduction to Statistical Methods 3
HUM 1022 (680:022) Humanities II: The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment 3
LAC 3A - Fine Arts 3
LAC 5B - Individual And Institutional Perspectives 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
CRIM 2025 (982:025) Criminology 3
LAC 3B - Literature, Philosophy And Religion 3
LAC 4B - Physical Sciences 3
Topical Perspectives 3
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
LAC 2B - Non-Western Cultures 3
LAC 4A - Life Sciences 4
University Electives 9
 Hours16
Junior
Fall
Group 1 Criminology Elective 3
Group 2 Criminology Elective 3
KAHHS 1020 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lecture 1
KAHHS 1030 Dimensions of Wellbeing Lab 1
University Electives 9
 Hours17
Spring
Group 1 Criminology Elective 3
Group 3 Criminology Elective 3
SOC 2010 (980:108) Research Methods 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Group 3 Criminology Elective 3
Group 1 Criminology Elective 3
Capstone Experience 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Group 2 Criminology Elective 3
CRIM 4575 (982:175) Senior Seminar in Criminology 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Criminology and Criminal Justice: Corrections, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
CRIM 2022 (982:022) Criminal Justice System 3
CRIM 2025 (982:025) Criminology 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
SOC 2010 (980:108) Research Methods 3
Criminology Electives 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours15
Spring
SOC 2020 (980:080) Statistics for Social Research 3
Criminology Electives 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
Criminology Electives 3
Corrections Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
Corrections Elective (3000/4000 Level) 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Corrections Elective (3000/4000 Level) 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
Spring
CRIM 4575 (982:175) Senior Seminar in Criminology 3
University Electives 12
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Criminology and Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
CRIM 2022 (982:022) Criminal Justice System 3
CRIM 2025 (982:025) Criminology 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
SOC 2010 (980:108) Research Methods 3
Criminology Electives 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours15
Spring
SOC 2020 (980:080) Statistics for Social Research 3
Criminology Electives 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
Criminology Electives 3
Law Enforcement Elective 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
Law Enforcement Elective (3000/4000 Level) 3
Criminal Justice Electives 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Law Enforcement Elective (3000/4000 Level) 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 9
 Hours15
Spring
CRIM 4575 (982:175) Senior Seminar in Criminology 3
University Electives 12
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Sociology, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid
Freshman
FallHour
SOC 1000 (980:001) Introduction to Sociology (or SOC 1060 Social Problems) 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Spring
SOC 2xxxx Sociology Elective at the 2000 Level 3
Liberal Arts Core 9
University Elective 3
 Hours15
Sophomore
Fall
SOC 2000 The Sociological Career 3
SOC 2020 (980:080) Statistics for Social Research 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 3
 Hours15
Spring
SOC 2010 (980:108) Research Methods 3
Liberal Arts Core 6
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Junior
Fall
Core in Sociology (Two Courses) 6
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g) Sociological Theory (or senior year spring semester) 3
Core in Sociology 3
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Senior
Fall
Sociology Electives * 6
Liberal Arts Core 3
University Electives 6
 Hours15
Spring
Sociology Electives 6
University Electives 9
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1001 (990:010). Human Origins — 3 hrs.

Introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology with emphases on evolutionary theory, variation and adaptation, primatology, paleoanthropology, animal and plant domestication, and the rise to early civilization. (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 1002 (990:011). Introduction to Cultural Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to cross-cultural perspective on human behavior. Consideration of the nature of society and culture among diverse human groups, from hunter-gatherers to industrialized city dwellers, by examination of their technologies, economic systems, family life, political structures, art, languages, and religious beliefs and practices. Emphasis on non-Western societies. (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 2018. Food and Culture — 3 hrs.

This course examines the relationship between human food and culture from a holistic and comparative perspective. Key issues related to food, nutrition, and culture will be considered. Major topics include sociocultural and ecological underpinnings of human nutrition and the evolution of the human food ways and food systems; sociocultural, symbolic, and medical uses of food; food and ethnicity; food and class; food and gender; industrial food, fast food, and traditional food; the political economy of food overconsumption and malnutrition; food and equality; and global food justice. (Variable)

ANTH 2401. Tribal Religions — 3 hrs.

Tribal Religions is designed to provide students with an introduction to the religions and spirituality of indigenous societies from around the world. Special attention is given to the relationships between religion and the environment, and between religion and the social, political and economic organizations of a society. (Same as RELS 2401) (Fall)

ANTH 2420. Primate Behavior — 3 hrs.

Examination of behavior and appearance of nonhuman primates in response to environmental and social factors. Investigation of how diet, reproduction, and social interaction among prosimians, monkeys, and apes act as a foundation for interpreting the origins of humans and their behaviors. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010). (Fall)

ANTH 2430. Bioarchaeology — 3 hrs.

This class focuses on the study of human skeletal remains from archaeological settings to aid in reconstructing the biological and cultural pasts of populations. The goals and objectives of this class are to provide the student with a basic knowledge of bioarchaeological theory, methods, and applications with an emphasis on the latest literature and research. The class will be grounded in the scientific approach. The student will leave the class with the ability to examine human skeletal remains with the intent of providing biocultural information about the identity of an individual and how it relates to the overall demographics of the population being studied. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010). (Odd Falls)

ANTH 3001 (990:177). Language and Culture — 3 hrs.

Examination of how language use shapes and expresses cultural identity. Implications of linguistic diversity for world view, gender and ethnic identity, education, and cross-cultural communication. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011). (Variable)

ANTH 3080/5080 (990:120g). Immigration and Transnationalism — 3 hrs.

Comparative multi-disciplinary perspective on international migration and immigrant settlement strategies, with a focus on Western Europe and the United States. Topics cover the main theoretical and contemporary debates within the field of international migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. [Same as SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g)] (Variable)

ANTH 3101/5101 (990:164g). Psychological Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Psychological dimensions of sociocultural systems from a cross-cultural perspective. Analysis of universals and cultural variation in cognition, socialization, concepts of the self, emotion, and mental illness. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as PSYCH 4607/5607 (400:164g)) (Spring)

ANTH 3102/5102 (990:168g). Culture, Disease, and Healing — 3 hrs.

Introduction to medical anthropology through examination of the interactions among culture, disease, and healing. Emphasis on non-Western medical systems. Topics include development of medical anthropology; the social fabric of health; the cultural context of health, illness, and disease. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 3103 (990:161). Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft — 3 hrs.

This course emphasizes a comparative and anthropological approach to the study of religion, magic and witchcraft. Course content includes the study of classical theoretical frameworks that explain of religious beliefs and practices and in-depth discussions on diverse religious systems. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1002 (990:011) and junior standing; or consent of instructor. (Same as RELS 3103 (640:161)) (Spring)

ANTH 3104/5104 (990:167g). Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective — 3 hrs.

Evolutionary, biological, psychological, cognitive, social, and cultural theories of gender and gender inequality evaluated with respect to cross-cultural data. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as PSYCH 4608/5608 (400:167g)) (Spring)

ANTH 3132 (990:132). Native North America — 3 hrs.

Ethnographic survey of sociocultural systems developed by Native Americans north of Mexico. Emphasis on relationships that exist among ecological factors, subsistence techniques, social organizations, and belief systems; and the impact interactions with European and U.S. societies had on Indian lifestyles. (Same as HUM 3132 (680:132)) (Variable)

ANTH 3137 (990:137). Native Central and South America — 3 hrs.

Ethnographic focus on the sociocultural systems of the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica, Amazon Basin, and the Andean Highlands. Emphasis on inter-relationships among environment, history, social organizations, and belief systems from a holistic and comparative perspective. (Same as HUM 3137 (680:137)) (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 3201 (990:151). Physical Anthropology: History and Theory — 3 hrs.

Historical perspective on the development of evolutionary thought and how it changed ideas in physical anthropology, including the theoretical foundations of the "modern synthesis", the race concept, primate studies, paleoanthropology, and human ecology and adaptation. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing. (Spring)

ANTH 3202/5202 (990:152g). Human Biological Variation — 3 hrs.

Exploration of the processes and origins of human biological variability, adaptability, and responses to a changing environment. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing. (Spring)

ANTH 3302 (990:142). Archaeology of the New World — 3 hrs.

Prehistory of North American Indians and major prehistoric cultures in Central and South America, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca, traced from earliest arrival of peoples in the New World to time of European contact. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ANTH 3303 (990:143). Archaeology of the Old World — 3 hrs.

Prehistory of Africa, Asia, Europe, and Australia from dawn of humanity to civilizations of Egypt, Indus Valley, Mesopotamia, and China. Emphasis also on prehistory of simple hunter-gatherer cultures in the Old World. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); junior standing or consent of instructor. (Variable)

ANTH 3420 (990:155). Forensic Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to methods used in the recovery of unidentified human remains, their use in establishing identity, the post-mortem interval, pathological defects and traumatic insults and reconstructing the events surrounding death. Knowledge of the human skeletal anatomy preferred. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010). (Fall)

ANTH 3431/5431 (990:171g). Interpreting the Archaeological Record — 3 hrs.

Anthropological approaches to archaeology, including history of research; formation of archaeological record; research design, data collection, artifact analysis, classification, interpretation, dating, and inference. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); ANTH 1002 (990:011); 3 hours of 100/3000/4000-level archaeology or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Odd Falls)

ANTH 3440/5440 (990:125g). Introduction to Museum Studies — 3 hrs.

Exploration of history, public mission, working environment, and ethical issues of museums. Discussion of practical skills and theoretical issues of museum studies, exposing students to broad range of museum types and career opportunities. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Same as HIST 4020/5020 (960:125g)) (Variable)

ANTH 3441/5441 (990:162g). Crime, Law, and Justice: A Global Perspective — 3 hrs.

Exploration of similarities and diversity in crime, law, and social control in a cross-cultural and global perspective. Examination of case studies from traditional and contemporary; emphasis on theoretical approaches from anthropology, sociology, and criminology. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 3450 (990:172). Archaeological Fieldwork — 3-8 hrs.

Introduction to field research techniques (survey, excavation, and mapping), laboratory processing, and hypothesis testing. Conducted in the field. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 (990:010); consent of instructor. (Summer)

ANTH 3470 (990:102). Conflict Resolution — 3 hrs.

Survey of social science theory and research in conflict resolution with emphasis on development of less destructive modes of problem solving in social formations. Prerequisite(s): SW 1001 or PSYCH 1001 (400:001) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Fall and Spring)

ANTH 3501 (990:145). Research Experience in Anthropology — 1-3 hrs.

Research participation and/or independent supervised research in anthropology. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 15 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ANTH 3502 (990:184). Experience in Applied Anthropology — 1-6 hrs.

Work experience in applied anthropology. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ANTH 3503/5503 (990:189g). Readings in Anthropology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated only with consent of department. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in anthropology; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

ANTH 4001/5001 (990:176g). Anthropological Theory — 3 hrs.

Major theoretical developments in anthropology, including both historical and contemporary schools and trends. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Spring)

ANTH 4010/5010. Climate Change, Human Migration and Conflict — 3 hrs.

There is growing consensus among professionals in the intelligence and security fields that climate change has very real impacts on demographic displacement, vulnerability of growing masses of people to severe disasters (both natural and human-made) and that there are serious near- and long-term implications for national and global security. This course examines current and emerging forms of threats to nations and human communities that result, at least in part, from climate change. Recommended ANTH 1002 (990:011) be taken prior to this course. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall or Spring)

ANTH 4015/5015 (990:178g). Qualitative Research — 3 hrs.

Development and application of the qualitative descriptive and analytic methods used in social science research. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. [Same as SOC 4015/5015 (980:178g)] (Variable)

ANTH 4016/5016 (990:180g). Seminar in Anthropology — 3 hrs.

Selected problems within one subfield of anthropology (cultural, physical, archaeological, or anthropological linguistics). Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): vary with topic; junior standing. (Variable)

ANTH 4198 (990:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): written consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

ANTH 4485. Anthropology Internship — 1-3 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in an anthropology-related agency or position. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Intended for anthropology majors. May be repeated for maximum of three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of ANTH 4485 or 4585 may count toward the anthropology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in anthropology (ANTH xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ANTH 4585. Practical Field Experience — 1-3 hrs.

Designed for students currently working in in an anthropology-related agency or position. Provides an opportunity for students to apply academic material to their current jobs in anthropology or a related field. Intended for anthropology majors. May be repeated for maximum three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of ANTH 4485 or 4585 may count toward the anthropology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in anthropology (ANTH xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Criminology Courses

CRIM 2022 (982:022). Criminal Justice System — 3 hrs.

History, development, and day-to-day operation of the criminal justice system within our society. Emphasis is placed on interrelationships between specific stages in the crime-control process, the three major components of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections), and current issues/problems that the criminal justice system faces. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2025 (982:025). Criminology — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the study of criminal behavior with an emphasis on theories of crime causation. Strategies for reducing crime based on theoretical explanations and existing data are also discussed. This class also covers methods of how crime data is collected and how that data is used in the criminal justice system to change policing tactics, create crime prevention programs, and administer correctional programming. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2127 (982:127). Juvenile Delinquency — 3 hrs.

Examination of the causes of delinquency in children, focusing on the effects of parenting, youth subcultures, and the media. Includes youth crimes, such as shoplifting and vandalism. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025). (Spring)

CRIM 2134. Crime Analysis — 3 hrs.

Provides an introductory understanding of the history and methodology of examining crime information. Covers applied technical skills for managing, analyzing, and presenting data relevant to criminal justice agencies. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2020 (980:080) or STAT 1772 (800:072); sophomore standing. (Fall)

CRIM 2152 (982:152). Crime and Community — 3 hrs.

Exploration of the connection between community characteristics and crime with an emphasis on crime in the inner city. Students are presented with theories that address why some neighborhoods have concentrated crime and learn about what scholars, organizers, police, and politicians can do to reduce crime. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2025 (982:025). (Fall)

CRIM 2217 (982:117). Community Corrections — 3 hrs.

Community corrections covers all forms of punishment that take place in the community, from probation and parole to electronic monitoring, fines, boot camps, and intensive supervision. This class includes discussion of supervision and treatment options with all types of offenders, including sex offenders, mentally ill offenders, and those addicted to drugs and alcohol. Restorative justice and prison reentry programs are also covered. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022); sophomore standing. (Variable)

CRIM 2232 (982:132). Juvenile Justice — 3 hrs.

This course examines the ways that juveniles come into contact with the justice system through schools and policing, the varied experiences of juveniles in the courts and in custody, and what happens when juveniles are released from supervision. This course asks how power, race, social class, and gender impact a juveniles path through the system and their outcomes. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Spring)

CRIM 2500. Criminal Law and Procedure — 3 hrs.

This course covers the development of criminal law in America, including the historical development of 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th Amendment rights. Criminal law generally defines the rights and obligations of individuals, while procedural law concerns the protection of individual rights through all phases of the criminal justice process from first contact with police through trial and sentencing. Emphasis is on practical knowledge of procedural law for criminal justice workers. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 2502. Report Writing in Criminal Justice — 3 hrs.

This course provides an overview of written and oral communication for criminal justice professionals, including its purposes, policies, procedures and processes. Emphasis is on written documents prepared by the professional, but some attention will be given to oral communication, especially on practical skills such as testifying in court, interviewing victims , witnesses and suspects, and dealing with the media and the public. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 2504. Criminal Investigation — 3 hrs.

Covers fundamental principles and procedures employed in the investigation of a crime. Explores the primary components of interviewing and investigations; practices in the apprehension of suspects; preparation of criminal cases. This course is designed to develop a working knowledge of the steps in investigation from the initial securing of a crime scene to the presentation of evidence in trial. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 2506. Criminalistics — 3 hrs.

Introduction to the theory and practices of the collection, preservation, and analysis of physical evidence at a crime scene. Introduces students to the functions of the forensic laboratory and its relationship to successful investigations and prosecutions. Topics covered include crime scene processing, investigative techniques, and current forensic technologies. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Spring)

CRIM 3100. Social Deviance and Control — 3 hrs.

Causes and consequences of socially-disapproved behavior; role of social control agencies in recruitment of deviant identities, management of and reaction to deviance; dynamics of labeling processes, and examination of social meaning of non-normative behavior. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 3151 (982:151). Crime and Social Inequality — 3 hrs.

This class explores the significance of race, ethnicity, class, and gender inequality in the criminal justice system, including the relationship of inequality to law creation, law enforcement, court decisions, and correctional placement and treatment. A particular focus is placed on how ethnicity, race, class, and gender disparities are created in the system and what can be done to change these patterns. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3179 (982:179). Cooperative Education — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated for a total of six credit hours (only three credit hours may count towards completion of the Criminology major). Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head and Cooperative Education Office. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

CRIM 3200. Communication Ethics for Criminal Justice Professionals — 3 hrs.

Effective communication, both as an individual and as part of group, is an essential skill for any criminal justice professional. In this course, students will become familiar with and apply learned skills to different communication processes in the criminal justice system. Students will learn and apply non-verbal, written and oral communication skills to a variety of scenarios, including interviewing, interrogation, contact with the general public, social media, and interdepartmental communications. Emphasis is placed on the importance of ethical communications, both as an individual and as a group, between criminal justice professionals and offenders, victims, colleagues, and the general public. Prerequisite(s): CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3225. Criminal Court System — 3 hrs.

This course will explore the various roles of court personnel, attorneys, defendants, witnesses, and jurors. This course focuses on the impact of social inequality on the structure and operation of criminal courts in the United States. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 3226 (982:126g). Crime and Punishment — 3 hrs.

Crime and punishment in American society, social history of punishment, theories of punishment, and how it relates to prison subcultures, crime rates, power relations, and cultural values. A special focus on incarceration in the 21st century is provided. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 3228. Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System — 3 hrs.

Critical examination of issues related to mental health within the criminal justice system. This course will consider both the ways that individuals with mental health issues are disproportionately likely to have contact with the criminal justice system as well as the ways that the criminal justice system impacts mental health of individuals. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Spring)

CRIM 3314. Ethics in Crime, Law and Justice — 3 hrs.

Critical examination of ethical issues and dilemmas facing criminal justice professionals, framed within the context of both theoretical ethical systems and applied context. Ethical issues and dilemmas related to students and the general public are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 3319 (982:119g). Victimology — 3 hrs.

Sociological investigation of institutional, economic, family, and personal victimization in American society with special attention to causes and processes of exploitation. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 3369. Drugs and Society — 3 hrs.

This course explores the history of the regulation of psychoactive substances in the United States. In addition, this course provides an overview of social science research on drug use, drug enforcement, and media portrayals of drug use. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025). (Variable)

CRIM 3400. Police and Society — 3 hrs.

This course is a study of the criminal justice system and the problems it confronts to assess whether or not it effectively reduces crime and achieves justice. We will learn about the law and processes of the justice system in order to evaluate its proficiency as an instrument of social control. It covers the workings of law enforcement, the courts, and the correctional system, as well as juvenile justice. It reviews what constitutes crime, how crime is measured, and the theories used to explain crime. We will also examine the ideals and objectives of law enforcement, and we will explore sociological issues of race, class, gender, and power, in order to develop more effective strategies in the planning and development of crime policy. Additionally, this course looks to the future and outlines some of the pressing issues that continue to challenge crime control in a democratic society. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Spring)

CRIM 3500. Advanced Criminal Procedure — 3 hrs.

This course draws on social science research to explore the gap between the law on the books and the law in practice. This course will cover major areas in American criminal procedure like search and seizure, Miranda rights, and the right to counsel. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 4122 (982:122g). Youth Gangs — 3 hrs.

Origins and development of youth gangs in United States. Topics include recent emergence of gangs, especially in Iowa, relationship between drugs and violence and gang activity, and creation of social policy to prevent and control gang activity. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4137 (982:137g). Homicide — 3 hrs.

Presentation of a description, discussion, and evaluation of the various types of homicide. Focus on the characteristics and backgrounds of homicidal offenders. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Spring)

CRIM 4198 (982:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 4216 (982:116g). Correctional Treatment: Theory and Practice — 3 hrs.

Examination of evolution and development of correctional treatment in United States, with special attention to description and evaluation of programs in juvenile and adult corrections. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022) or CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4253 (982:153g). Crime and Public Policy — 3 hrs.

Analysis of public policy issues related to crime and justice. Focus on the design, implementation and evaluation of public policy responses to criminal behavior. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Fall)

CRIM 4300. Wrongful Convictions — 3 hrs.

This class explores the variety of ways that innocent people can be convicted of crimes they did not commit. We will consider problems that can occur in the investigation and prosecution processes and we will consider the steps that can be taken to reduce or eliminate these problems. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022). (Variable)

CRIM 4331/5331 (982:131g). Women, Crime and Society — 3 hrs.

Sociological analysis of women as victims, offenders, practitioners, and professionals in the criminal justice system. Examination of changing perceptions and behaviors of women in United States and other countries in relation to role expectations of women in criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 4350. Corrections Special Topics — 3 hrs.

Topics courses in corrections focus on a wide variety of issues related to either or both community-based corrections, incarceration, or correctional alternatives. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 4360. Law Enforcement Special Topics — 3 hrs.

Topics courses in law enforcement focus on a wide variety of issues related to policing, law enforcement officers, etc. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 4371. Topics in Criminal Justice — 3 hrs.

Topics courses in criminal justice focus on wide variety of issues related to police, courts, and corrections. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2022 (982:022); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 4381 (982:181g). Topics in Criminology — 3 hrs.

Topics courses in criminology focus on issues related to the definition, causes, patterns consequences, control, and political and social reactions to crime. Other topics focus on specialized topics of interest related to the field of criminology. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing. (Variable)

CRIM 4485 (982:185). Criminology Internship — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in a criminological or criminal justice related agency or position. May be repeated for maximum of six hours. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Intended for criminology majors. A maximum of three credit hours of CRIM 4485 (982:185) or 4585 may count toward the criminology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in criminology (CRIM xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

CRIM 4500. Criminology Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

Independent study course. Details to be determined by faculty and student. May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 4550. Criminal Justice Independent Study — 3 hrs.

Independent study course. Details to be determined by faculty and student. May be repeated with consent of department dead. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

CRIM 4575 (982:175). Senior Seminar in Criminology — 3 hrs.

Designed for students nearing graduation, this course covers information related to career preparation and employability. It also emphasizes personal growth and development while at the same time covering topics and issues relevant for all criminal justice professions. Prerequisite(s): Criminology major only; senior standing or consent of instructor. (Fall and Spring)

CRIM 4585. Practical Field Experience — 1-4 hrs.

Designed for students currently working in the criminal justice system or a field directly related to the system. Provides an opportunity for students to apply academic material to their current jobs in the criminal justice or related field. May be repeated for maximum of six hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001); CRIM 2022 (982:022); CRIM 2025 (982:025); junior standing; consent of Criminology Internship Coordinator and Department Head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Sociology Courses

SOC 1000 (980:001). Introduction to Sociology — 3 hrs.

Why do we do the things we do? Why is our society the way it is? Sociology teaches students to understand human behavior in an increasingly complex and dynamic social world. Students analyze how and why people act, think, and feel the ways they do. Identity, relationships, institutions, social structures, and the sociological perspective are topics covered. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 1060 (980:060). Social Problems — 3 hrs.

Social problems teaches students to analyze a variety of contemporary issues facing groups of people. Students will examine the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to the problems. Topics include topics like poverty, drugs, sex trafficking, discrimination, and mental illness. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 1070. Introduction to Human Rights — 3 hrs.

In recent years, "human rights" has become among the most powerful ways of thinking about and fighting for a more just world. This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concept, a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices with a particular focus on the sociological study of human rights. The course will begin with a study of the foundations of human rights that seeks to answer questions such as "What are human rights?" and "How or why do we have these rights?" Students will investigate the practice of human rights and the political structures that enable us to address human rights violations around the globe with an emphasis on the relationship between the individual and society. Finally, this course will allow students to consider the most salient, and often controversial, contemporary human rights challenges we face today, here in the U.S. and abroad. (Spring)

SOC 2000. The Sociological Career — 3 hrs.

The focus of this course is to help students prepare for a career using their sociology degree. To do this, we will cover issues related to maximizing time as a student on the UNI campus, as well as developing tools to help students pursue their own professional interests. This should encourage students to discover ways of becoming both a life-long learner and a successful professional in the career of their choice. (Fall)

SOC 2010 (980:108). Research Methods — 3 hrs.

Introduction to basic research methods used in social research. Conceptualization and operationalization of research problems. Examination of various research designs used to collect data. Introduction to sampling, instrumentation, data processing, data analysis, and report production. Priority to Sociology and Criminology majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2020 (980:080). Statistics for Social Research — 3 hrs.

Students learn many techniques for working with quantitative data including calculating and visually representing descriptive statistics for categorical and quantitative variables, and conducting hypothesis tests for bivariate and multivariate analyses. We focus on statistical inference, secondary data analysis, and improving data literacy skills for real world applications. Prerequisite(s): completion of mathematics requirement for the Liberal Arts Core. (Fall and Spring)

SOC 2030 (980:105g). Sociology of Families — 3 hrs.

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction to the sociology of families. We will explore topics such as families in historical perspective, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, families and work, divorce, and family diversity. Students should leave the course with a basic understanding of the concepts, principles, and methods used to study family experiences from a sociological perspective. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 2040 (980:156g). Social Movements — 3 hrs.

Social movements occur when people break from their ordinary, everyday lives and try to make broad social change. In this survey course we will examine the social, cultural, and political forces that that launch social movements, form the trajectory of movements, and shape counter-movements. We will look at historical and current cases, looking at how social movements are formed, and what makes them successful or unsuccessful. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 2075 (980:100g). Social Psychology — 3 hrs.

Analysis of how people's thoughts, feelings, actions, and identities are influenced by social processes, interactions, and structures. Special attention to how people acquire, construct, and negotiate identities and how they are influenced by social realities of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in these processes. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060). (Variable)

SOC 3035/5035 (980:125g). Social Gerontology — 3 hrs.

This course explores the social aspects of aging - how do older adults affect society and how does society affect older adults. We will do this by reviewing research on such topics as the demography of aging, aging in historical perspective, social support later in life, living arrangements, work and retirement, health and health care, and caregiving. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3037/5037 (980:045g). Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice — 3 hrs.

The nature, origin, and consequences of race and ethnicity as sources of differentiation and inequality. Examines competing theories, the distribution of resources across groups, and social processes related to race, ethnicity, and social justice. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3045/5045 (980:135g). Social Inequality — 3 hrs.

The nature, origins, and reproduction of social inequalities. Examines the distribution of resources across groups and the processes that create it. Covers class, race, gender, and sexuality, and their relationship to each other. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3050/5050 (980:129g). Men and Masculinities — 3 hrs.

Examination of men's lives from boys to men in such roles as friends, lovers, co-workers, family members, students, athletes, consumers, and soldiers. Consideration of diversities of male experiences through such categories as race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexual orientation, age, physical ability, and appearance. Prerequisite(s): junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3060/5060 (980:138g). Sociology of Culture — 3 hrs.

This class illustrates how the economy and personal taste can be connected, so that we feel like we must prefer some cultural forms over others. Students will learn how to find meaning in a variety of cultural forms through exploration and critical analysis. Topics include conspicuous consumption, leisure, subcultures, and celebrity culture. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): SOC 2010 (980:108). (Variable)

SOC 3070/5070 (980:170g). Sociological Theory — 3 hrs.

An overview of classical and contemporary social theory. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Spring)

SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g). Immigration and Transnationalism — 3 hrs.

Comparative multi-disciplinary perspective on international migration and immigrant settlement strategies, with a focus on Western Europe and the United States. Topics cover the main theoretical and contemporary debates within the field of international migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. [Same as ANTH 3080/5080 (990:120g)] (Variable)

SOC 3086/5086. Medical Sociology — 3 hrs.

Medical sociology is a broad field of study that uses sociological theories and methods to investigate the social causes and consequences of health and illness across the life course. This class examines: the social determinants of physical and mental health, disease, and mortality; health-seeking behaviors; doctor-patient interactions; health care providers; complementary and alternative medicine; health care systems domestically and globally; health care policy; and ethics. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) OR SOC 1060; consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3087/5087. Society and Mental Illness — 3 hrs.

Mental illness is an individual and social experience. In this class, we use sociological theories and methods to examine how definitions of mental illness changed over time, place, and cultural context. We investigate the social patterning of mental illness by race and ethnicity, social class, sex, and age, and how mental illness tends to cluster among those with the fewest resources. We consider the roles of stress, trauma, discrimination, and systems of social support. We critically analyze individual and social barriers to treatment, such as stigma, legal problems, and mental health public policy in the U.S. and abroad. Throughout the course we learn how sociologists work with other social scientists and medical professionals identifying the social causes and consequences of mental illness for individuals and society. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 3179 (980:179). Cooperative Education — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in cooperation with the Cooperative Education office. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head and Cooperative Education office. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4005/5005. Refugees and Humanitarianism — 3 hrs.

Refugees and Humanitarianism is meant to provoke passionate concern for the real-world consequences of refugee aid and measured social scientific thinking about how to respond to the challenges of humanitarian crisis in our "second-best world." This class explores the social and political challenges of living as a refugee and working in humanitarian settings, with a focus on refugee camps and the institutional development of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. How did refugee camps become the primary means to administer sanctuary? What are the consequences of this? The class also explores the outcomes refugees face when they are processed through the UN framework of durable solutions as well as alternative approaches to refuge. Topics include causes of flight and exile, the human rights of refugees and internally displaced persons, camp security, health, and environment, as well as contemporary solutions to forced migration. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4015/5015 (980:178g). Qualitative Research — 3 hrs.

This course is a first introduction to qualitative methods used in sociology and the social sciences. Students will learn participant observation, interviewing and ethnography skills, as well as analysis of material culture, visual sociology, oral history, analysis of documents and other forms of text, including the ambiguous online ethnography. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011); junior standing. (Same as ANTH 4015/5015 (990:178g)) (Variable)

SOC 4025/5025 (980:160g). Quantitative Research — 3 hrs.

In this course, students will become more familiar with the steps involved in conducting a quantitative research project, with an emphasis on survey research. The focus is on developing skills related to forming research questions and hypotheses guided by theory and prior research, collecting data, conducting data analysis, and interpreting and presenting results. This will increase understanding of how to conduct quantitative research and present it in a scholarly manner. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); SOC 2010 (980:108) or equivalent; SOC 2020 (980:080) or equivalent; completion of LAC mathematics requirement; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4036/5036. Program and Policy Evaluation — 3 hrs.

This course engages students on how social science methodologies can be applied to program and policy evaluation. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); SOC 2020 (980:080); or consent of the instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4051/5051. Sociology of Gender — 3 hrs.

Through an intersectional lens, students examine gender as a social, cultural, and institutional construction. Students will explore how gender influences social life within major social institutions such as media, family, the workplace, schools, religion, politics, and popular culture. Focus on US but also comparative. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4052/5052. Childhood Inequalities — 3 hrs.

In this course, we use sociological theories and research methods to critically analyze the social and structural forces that influence child development and the social construction of childhood. We pay careful attention to social, cultural, legal, familial, and societal processes that lead to unequal childhoods and perpetuate social problems such as the school-to-prison pipeline, medicalizing child emotions and behaviors, childhood poverty and hunger, child abuse, neglect, and trauma, and the separation and detention of children from their migrant families. Throughout the course, we use a sociological perspective to understand the problems children face and what can be done to reduce childhood inequalities. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); junior standing. (Fall)

SOC 4053. Social Justice Seminar — 3 hrs.

The Social Justice seminar is the culminating class for the Social Justice Minor. Students will implement what they have learned throughout the minor into an applied term project where students work on a specific social justice issue. This course will cover social justice organizing and practice across a range of social institutions. Students will engage with questions of defining social justice and its relation to other concepts, such as diversity, equity, inclusion, culture, identity, and respect. Issues in Social Justice research, movements, theory, and human rights will be used as case studies for students to critically examine contemporary social issues, events, policies and practice. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060); 6 hours from the following: SOC 3037/5037 (980:045g), SOC 3060/5060 (980:138g), SOC 3080/5080 (980:120g), SOC 3086/5086, SOC 3087/5087, SOC 4005/5005, SOC 4051/5051, or consent of instructor. (Odd Springs)

SOC 4071/5071 (980:171g). Feminist Theories in the Social Sciences — 3 hrs.

Survey of theoretical approaches to study of sex and gender. Classical, structural, neo-Freudian, Marxist feminist, and radical approaches. Topics include work, family, religion, and sexuality. Prerequisite(s): SOC SCI 1020 (900:020) or SOC 1000 (980:001) or SOC 1060 (980:060) or ANTH 1002 (990:011) or WGS 1040 (680:040); junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4198 (980:198). Independent Study — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)

SOC 4485. Sociology Internship — 1-3 hrs.

Experiential learning through internship placement in a sociology-related agency or position. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Intended for sociology majors. May be repeated for maximum three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of SOC 4485 or SOC 4585 may count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology (SOC xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher, junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4499/5499. Seminar in Sociology — 3 hrs.

Selected topics; opportunity to correlate previous course work and knowledge in field of sociology. Topic listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108) or consent of instructor; junior standing. (Variable)

SOC 4500/5500. Theory and Practice in Applied Settings — 1-6 hrs.

Experiential learning in sociology. Requires prior consultation with instructor. Offered on credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4501/5501. Research Experience in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

Research participation and/or independent supervised research. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology including SOC 2010 (980:108); junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4502/5502. Readings in Sociology — 1-3 hrs.

May be repeated only with consent of department. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in sociology; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 4585. Practical Field Experience — 1-3 hrs.

Designed for students currently working in in an sociology-related agency or position. Provides an opportunity for students to apply academic material to their current jobs in sociology or a related field. Intended for sociology majors. May be repeated for maximum three hours. A maximum of three credit hours of SOC 4485 or SOC 4585 may count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in sociology (SOC xxxx); major GPA of 2.80 or higher; junior standing; consent of instructor and department head. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

SOC 6299 (980:299). Research.

Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and department head. (Variable)